TBI – Survivors, Caregivers, Family, and Friends

Archive for October, 2016

SPEAK OUT! . . . . . . . . . . . . . Guest Blogger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Karen Dickerson

Never Give Up!

by

Karen Dickerson

presented by

Donna O’Donnell Figurski

Girl Blogger cartoon_picture_of_girl_writingOn March 2nd, 2014, I was involved in a car accident that changed my life forever. My speech was slurred; I couldn’t read; I couldn’t even write my own name.

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Karen Dickerson – Brain Injury Survivor

Two months after my accident, I was so proud to write my name again that I signed divorce papers I couldn’t comprehend. I also signed so that my brain injury wouldn’t be used to take my children away. For fifteen years, I was married – and in an abusive relationship. I had three children, and I was left with nothing. Not even child support. I had lived a fairly comfortable life, financially speaking. I just wanted out and couldn’t take the confusion of court proceedings, but yet I couldn’t understand why. Everyone said I looked “normal.”

I struggled to feed my children. I swallowed my pride even when I was standing in line at a food pantry. I walked dragging my left leg to my speech, physical, and occupational therapy sessions, thinking that my leg problem would just go away in a few weeks. A friend helped me buy a car with what little money I had. I spent a few cold nights sleeping in it, confused as to where I was, what I was doing, and when my next appointments were. I’d yell at anyone who crossed my path – losing friendships. Family left me all alone. I fought with my auto insurance company for my rights in a no-fault state, and, after several months, I finally received compensation for wage losses.

I’m not sure how it happened (as things are a complete blur at times), but I finally found a good doctor and a nurse case-manager to help me. I was put into a neuro rehab program an hour away from home. (I had to let my children go live with their dad.) Seven days a week, I learned basic living skills and tried to control my anger and frustrations and emotional outbursts. I had constant legal issues, as I was beginning to realize that what I had signed in my divorce was not what I thought. The settlement was not good for me. As a result, I had to fight for my children and for child support. After a few battles, I won their support! After getting through those struggles, I finally realized I needed to take this TBI (traumatic brain injury) head on and fight to get my life back.counsleing

I was angry that I couldn’t do the simple things a child could do, and I was frustrated that I had tested intellectually as lower than high-school level. As hard as it was, I learned coping skills to control my damaged frontal lobe and to try to focus. After my rehab program ended, I moved back home to be with my children. I went to all my therapies (three times a week) and to numerous tests and doctors. I got my kids to and from school every day. I learned how to cook again. After almost two years, I was finally beginning to live a somewhat normal life again. I was even able to meet a wonderful, humble, and understanding man. What were the chances that his own brother-in-law had a TBI? The new man in my life knew exactly what I was going through and accepted my flaws and deficits.

I then started to get interested in learning about this misunderstood injury. I attended the BIAMI (Brain Injury Association of Michigan) meetings in Lansing, Michigan. Using social media as a tool, I advocated and educated others. Hearing good vibes from all over the country and the world, I began to realize how many people just like me were out there. I had to do something about brain injury, as I was so misunderstood and I was tired of being called “crazy.”social-media

I began to excel in all my therapies, which moved me into vocational training. I was asked to put my résumé together. I did – I looked at it and saw that I never had the opportunity to go to college. I was a single mom at nineteen, and I married someone who wouldn’t allow me to grow. I could have gone back to real estate, but how was that helping people? I could have returned to the ophthalmology career that I had for years, but I was limited by the small area I live in. I had already worked for the one surgeon, but he told me that he didn’t trust me with his patients anymore because of my TBI.

th-1As hard as occupational therapy was for me, it was also fun. I gained friendships with my occupational and speech therapists. Even if I couldn’t do their tasks that day, they were still there for me to talk. They comforted me and encouraged me to keep on going. I looked into the OTA (occupational therapy assistant) program and thought Why not see if I can try it? With my disability, there should be some accommodations, and, after what I’ve been through with so many occupational therapy sessions, I thought I might just know a little about it!

I took the test and was accepted to Baker College! (Two years and five months post TBI.) I went to orientation yesterday and teared up as I walked on campus.

Karen Dickerson - Brain Injury Survivor & College Student at Baker College

Karen Dickerson – Brain Injury Survivor & College Student at Baker College

As I sat in a loud room with others picking their classes, I struggled to drown out the noise, as audio is still a daily struggle. The abbreviations and so much on the class schedule – even with military times, were problematic. I thought for one second I can’t do this. Then I remembered all those times I did “do it,” and I focused and got my class schedule done. At 39 years old, a TBI survivor, a domestic-abuse survivor, and a mother of three, I am a college student!

This program is offered near Grand Rapids, Michigan, over three hours away. As I checked in, I met the president of the college, and he noted where I was living. All I could say was, “I’m going to do this.” It is in my heart. God has gotten me this far. I will NOT give up!

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SPEAK OUT! . . . . . . . . . . Itty-Bitty GIANT Steps

SPEAK OUT! Itty-Bitty GIANT Steps

presented by

Donna O’Donnell Figurski

Itty-Bitty GIant Steps for BlogSPEAK OUT! Itty-Bitty Giant Steps will provide a venue for brain-injury survivors and caregivers to shout out their accomplishments of the week.

If you have an Itty-Bitty Giant Step and you would like to share it, just send an email to me at neelyf@aol.com.

If you are on Facebook, you can simply send a Private Message to me. It need only be a sentence or two. I’ll gather the accomplishments and post them with your name on my blog approximately once a week. (If you do not want your lastname to be posted, please tell me in your email or Private Message.)

I hope we have millions of Itty-Bitty Giant Steps.

Here is this week’s Itty-Bitty GIANT Steps

 

byler-penny-survivor

Penny Byler (survivor) … So, today, I took off my leg brace and climbed the side of a small cliff. Yes, I MADE IT ON MY OWN! It was fun. I’m glad I did it. My leg, on the other hand, is refusing to listen to me now. It doesn’t want to support ANY of my weight. Oh well. Maybe tomorrow.

 

Dave Figurski (survivor) … My trike has changed my life! Cat Brubaker, who rode alongside Dan Zimmerman on a 5,390-mile cross-country trek, introduced me to the Catrike 700, which both she and Dan have. Cat and Donna encouraged me, and I bought the same model in April 2015. I ride three days a week, fifteen miles each ride. The recumbent trike is perfect for me because I have a balance problem. When I ride, I feel perfectly normal. (The day I did my first ride was the first time in ten years that I was outside alone!) I recently passed 2500 miles.

David on Recumbent Trike

I have much farther to go before I equal the mileage done by Dan and Cat on their cross-country ride. But, I’m having fun, and I don’t intend to stop.

 

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Ric Johnson – Brain Injury Survivor

Ric Johnson (survivor) … I spent twelve hours (in two days) in my back and front yards to aerate both, and then I spread compost on both. I’m not going to count all the holes my shovel and I dug, but there must be more than 200. Hard work, but I did it!

 

 

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Alex Manning (survivor) … I got a little emotional today. At the end of April 2015, a skateboarding accident left me in a coma that permanently changed my life. Health professionals thought I might not survive through the night.

alex-manning-survivor

Alex Manning – Brain Injury Survivor

Despite my coma only lasting a day, I didn’t remember anything for three weeks, and I forgot mostly everything from my prior 23 years. In the hospital, I accepted that I might not return to living independently. Returning to independence was such a struggle; I never thought I’d be capable of something like this. I’m staying by myself in Sydney this week. I know a grand total of three people in this country, and they’re far away! They’re located in Melbourne and outside of Brisbane. Independence doesn’t get much more independent than this. TBI (traumatic brain injury) is not the end. It’s just a new beginning!

YOU did it!

Congratulations to contributors!

(Clip Art compliments of Bing.)

(Photos compliments of contributors.)

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SPEAK OUT! . . . . . . . . . . . . . Faces of Brain Injury . . . . . . . . . Natalie Collins (survivor)

SPEAK OUT! Faces of Brain Injury – Natalie Collins (survivor)

presented

by

Donna O’Donnell Figurski

Brain Injury is NOT Discriminating!

bigstock-cartoon-face-vector-people-25671746-e1348136261718It can happen to anyone, anytime, . . . and anywhere.

The Brain Trauma Foundation states that there are 5.3 million people in the United States living with some form of brain injury.

On “Faces of Brain Injury,” you will meet survivors living with brain injury. I hope that their stories will help you to understand the serious implications and complications of brain injury.

The stories on SPEAK OUT! Faces of Brain Injury are published with the permission of the survivor or designated caregiver.

If you would like your story to be published, please send a short account and two photos to me at neelyf@aol.com. I’d love to publish your story and raise awareness for Brain Injury.

Natalie Collins - Brain Injury Survivor

Natalie Collins – Brain Injury Survivor

Natalie Collins (survivor)

I am officially two years away from the day of my car wreck. My “new birthday” was a few weeks ago. So much has changed in my life. I see life so differently than most people. I know what it’s like to face death. That changes who you are. Not only do I have memory problems, trip all the time, have constant headaches, and have less proficient reading and comprehension skills, but also emotionally I’m a different person. I’m less tolerant of things that don’t make me happy. There’s a dark side as well. Total recovery isn’t ever expected to happen. I’ve lost many friends, found out who my real friends are, and have been in roseneed more times than not. (I try to do things on my own, but I have accepted that I need assistance with some things. I attempt to hide that part of this traumatic change in my “new” life.) I understand life isn’t always pleasant. It’s “a bunch of roses,” and roses have thorns. I get stuck many times, but I simply walk away. This is part of the change. Overall, I’m just me.

Thank you Natalie Collins for sharing your story.

(Clip Art compliments of Bing.)

(Photos compliments of contributor.)

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Trike Treks – David Figurski

Trike Treks – David Figurski

presented

by

Donna O’Donnell Figurski

David Figurski 2004 Pre-Brain Injury

David Figurski – pre-brain injury

My husband, David, bought a Catrike 700 in April 2015.  He rides three days each week, 15 miles each day. David loves his trike. Despite not being able to walk outside unassisted because of a balance problem, he feels “normal” when he rides. He has found that people have a lot of curiosity about the trike. People have stopped him to ask questions. One woman talked to him from her car when they were at a Stop sign.

David is excited because he just broke 2,500 miles. But he still has a ways to go before he equals the 5,390 miles ridden by Dan Zimmerman and Catherine Brubaker on their cross-country trek.

David’s cumulative mileage as of 10/13/16               2,580 mi

Miles to reach 5,390* miles                                          2,810 mi

UPDATE:

David’s cumulative mileage as of 09/04/117               3,727 mi

Miles to reach 5,390* miles                                          1,663 mi

*done by both Dan Zimmerman and Catherine Brubaker on their cross-country ride

Figurski, David Trike

David Figurski – post-brain injury on his Catrike 700

As I say after each post: Please leave a comment by clicking the blue words “Leave a Commentanim0014-1_e0-1 below this post.

Feel free to follow my blog. Click on “Follow” on the upper right sidebar.

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Caregivers SPEAK OUT! Bob Millsap

Caregivers SPEAK OUT! Bob Millsap

presented

by

Donna O’Donnell Figurski

Bob Millsap - Caregiver

Bob Millsap – Caregiver

1. What is your name? (last name optional)

Bob Millsap

2. Where do you live? (city and/or state and/or country) 

Glendale, Arizona, USA

Email? (optional)

robertemillsap@gmail.com

3. What is the brain-injury survivor’s relationship to you? How old was the survivor when he/she had the brain injury? What caused your survivor’s brain injury?

My wife, Shelly, is the brain-injury survivor. She was 46. It happened because of a freak accident in our home – a bottle of homemade ginger-ale exploded just as Shelly walked by. It broke her nose and bruised her face, but the TBI (traumatic brain injury) symptoms did not become apparent for two weeks.

4. On what date did you begin care for your brain-injury survivor? Were you the main caregiver? Are you now? How old were you when you began care?

I began care on January 17, 2013. I was 45. I was then and am now Shelly’s main caregiver.

5. Were you caring for anyone else at that time (e.g., children, parents, etc.)?

Yes. Our boys were 12 and 18 at the time.

6. Were you employed at the time of your survivor’s brain injury? If so, were you able to continue working?

Yes. I worked many hours. I had an employer who was not very understanding. This was very challenging. It made me re-evaluate things career-wise.

7. Did you have any help? If so, what kind and for how long?

No. We lived at the time in Victor, Idaho (near Jackson Hole, Wyoming). We were in a very rural area. There was no family support near us.

8. When did your support of the survivor begin (e.g., immediately – in the hospital; when the survivor returned home; etc.)?

My support started once my wife’s TBI symptoms became apparent.

9. Was your survivor in a coma? If so, what did you do during that time?

Shelly was unconscious for twenty minutes.

10. Did your survivor have rehab? If so, what kind of rehab (i.e., inpatient and/or outpatient and occupational, physical, speech, and/or other)? How long was the rehab? Where were you when your survivor was getting therapy?

Shelly had to relearn to walk and talk. She worked with a couple of alternative
providers that we will always be thankful for. She continues to do home therapy.

11. What problems or disabilities of your brain-injury survivor required your care, if any?

Shelly has severe PTSD (post-traumatic stress disorder), so I help any way possible for this. I try to keep daily life as simple and consistent as possible, with constant support and advocacy. I do the driving and I manage her medications.

12. How has your life changed since you became a caregiver? Is it better? Is it worse?keep-calm

It hurts so much to witness Shelly live this every day. But I am more patient and understanding as a person. I don’t sweat the small things as I used to.

13. What do you miss the most from pre-brain-injury life?

I miss Shelly’s being able to live life without fear.

14. What do you enjoy most in post-brain-injury life?

I like that the deep bond in our immediate family has strengthened.

15. What do you like least about brain injury?

I dislike knowing that Shelly must face challenges every day.

16. Has anything helped you to accept your survivor’s brain injury?

Dealing with this has been made possible by our faith in God, our love for each other, and Shelly’s AMAZING outlook. I never see her feeling sorry for herself. It’s amazing and inspiring.

17. Has your survivor’s injury affected your home life and relationships and, if so, how?iloveuredflyingheartsgifanimatedimagesfreedownloadbannerlove-gifphotographicclipartmobileiphoneipadscreensaverbackgroundfreeclipartanimationgifmaniahd3diloveyou

Our relationship is stronger than ever. It has really given us perspective on what is important. Our two boys are very compassionate and understanding. I am very proud of how they handle this.

18. Has your social life been altered or changed and, if so, how?

We moved back to Arizona earlier this year, and that has been great for Shelly! It was lonely for her in rural Idaho, even before the accident. Some of her friends have been
GREAT once she got back here. Others … not so much. We try to make
sure to stay out of loud, chaotic, or unpredictable situations. We adjust to our new normal. Shelly’s TBI is truly an invisible injury, so some friends and family understand … some do not.
19. What are your plans? What do you expect/hope to be doing ten years from now?

I would love to see Shelly be able to have a rewarding, peaceful life outside of the home. She is such a kind and helpful person. I always believe there is a way that her experience with TBI and PTSD can greatly help others.

20. What advice would you offer other caregivers of brain-injury survivors? Do you have any other comments that you would like to add?

Shelly Millsap - Brain Injury Survivor Bob Millsap - Caregiver

Shelly Millsap – Brain Injury Survivor
Bob Millsap – Caregiver

Take one day at a time. Be patient. Ask questions of the medical and rehab communities. Search for answers. Try not to ask “Why me?” and feel sorry for yourself. Rid yourself of negative situations and negative people. Be flexible and have thick skin. Find support-groups to become involved with.

(Disclaimer: The views or opinions in this post are solely that of the interviewee.)

If you would like to be a part of the SPEAK OUT! project, please go to TBI SPEAK OUT! Caregiver Interview Questionnaire for a copy of the questions and the release form.

(Clip Art compliments of Bing.)

As I say after each post: Please leave a comment by clicking the blue words “Leave a Commentanim0014-1_e0-1 below this post.

Feel free to follow my blog. Click on “Follow” on the upper right sidebar.

If you like my blog, share it with your friends. It’s easy! Click the “Share” buttons below.

If you don’t like my blog, “Share” it with your enemies. I don’t care!

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Survivors SPEAK OUT! Shelly Millsap

Survivors SPEAK OUT! Shelly Millsap

presented

by

Donna O’Donnell Figurski

Shelly Rupert Millsap - Brain Injury Survivor

Shelly Rupert Millsap – Brain Injury Survivor

1. What is your name? (last name optional)

Shelly Millsap

2. Where do you live? (city and/or state and/or country) Email (optional)

Glendale, Arizona, USA

3. On what date did you have your brain injury? At what age?

My brain injury happened on January 17, 2013. I was 46.

4. How did your brain injury occur?

I was in a freak accident at home – a bottle of homemade ginger ale exploded in my face.dcredykoi

5. When did you (or someone) first realize you had a problem?

I realized I had a problem approximately 1-2 weeks after my accident.

6. What kind of emergency treatment, if any, did you have?

I was taken to the Emergency Room for CT (computerized tomography) scan.

7. Were you in a coma? If so, how long?

I was knocked unconscious for about twenty minutes.

8. Did you do rehab? What kind of rehab (i.e., inpatient or outpatient and occupational and/or physical and/or speech and/or other)?

I had to do rehab to relearn to walk correctly and talk correctly. I still do home therapy – I’m trying to regain abilities for a lot of things that I once could do easily and now cannot.

How long were you in rehab?

A few months

9. What problems or disabilities, if any, resulted from your brain injury (e.g., balance, perception, personality, etc.)?

gg61447820I have severe PTSD (post-traumatic stress disorder) and cannot be around loud noises or big crowds. I have issues with being in new environments. I tire very easily. I don’t understand people when they talk too quickly. I can’t remember new information very easily. I get lost easily or become disoriented. I have balance issues. I have a bit of anger inside that wasn’t there before … the list goes on and on.

10. How has your life changed? Is it better? Is it worse?

I can’t say that my life is better, but I refuse to say that it is worse. It is a work in progress. Life is full of ups and downs. I have always been a person who likes to take care of people. It is hard for me to let anyone take care of me. My life has changed in the mere fact that I need help with certain things … I used to be very independent. I still am, but I know that I have limitations now.

11. What do you miss the most from your pre-brain-injury life?

I miss being out-and-about without worrying that the noise will be too much or that I’ll be in a situation that will mentally paralyze me. I miss the ability to get into my car and know that I can drive myself anywhere I want to go.

12. What do you enjoy most in your post-brain-injury life?

I enjoy seeing the changes that have happened to my immediate family. They have become more compassionate.large_familylovetitle

13. What do you like least about your brain injury?

I dislike my new limitations and the loss of who I once was intellectually.

14. Has anything helped you to accept your brain injury?

God. I’ve always had a strong faith, and I know that God isn’t looking down and laughing at me. This didn’t happen because of some sick joke. God is going to use me and my experience to help someone else. I believe that we all have the choice to have a good day or a bad day. When I wake up, I choose to have a good one. There are things that come into my path at times that aren’t always pleasant, but I try to not focus too much on that and move on.

15. Has your injury affected your home life and relationships and, if so, how?

Yes. I have friends who have a hard time with this and really don’t call or communicate much anymore. I understand. It’s hard for some people. I don’t worry myself too much about what is out of my control with people who don’t understand. I just try to focus on the people who are still around and cherish them.

16. Has your social life been altered or changed and, if so, how?

I can’t go out a lot because of the noise. I don’t handle situations very well when I don’t know what is going to happen. I can’t be spontaneous. I have a hard time going to movies because of the noise. It’s hard going out to eat at times. But I do get together with my good friends a lot.

17. Who is your main caregiver? Do you understand what it takes to be a caregiver?

Shelly Rupert Millsap - Brain Injury Survivor Bob Millsap - Caregiver

Shelly Rupert Millsap – Brain Injury Survivor
Bob Millsap – Caregiver

My main caregiver is ME … with some help from my husband.

18. What are your plans? What do you expect/hope to be doing ten years from now?

I’m not sure. It’s hard for me to look that far into the future. So many things have changed in my life that I kind of take it day to day. My main goal in life is to help people, and I plan on continuing to do that. I think that we should all give more than we take from this world. That is how I live my life. I’m not a “people-pleaser.” I could care less sometimes if I please someone. I hate that term. I do things because they need to be done. I just try to treat people the way that I want to be treated.

19. Are you able to provide a helpful hint that may have taken you a long time to learn, but which you wished you had known earlier? If so, please state what it is to potentially help other survivors with your specific kind of brain injury.

Gosh, that is a hard one. I am tired and can’t think of anything right now.

20. What advice would you offer to other brain-injury survivors? Do you have any other comments that you would like to add?

No matter what your circumstance, there is always someone else out there who probably has it worse. If you are having a bad day and are feeling hopeless, remember that tomorrow is just around the corner and that most likely it will be a better day. You can pick yourself up and make the most out of what you still have. Life is a precious thing. Live it, love it, and be around people who love you as you are.

NOTE:surviving-brain-injury-stories-of-strength-and-inspiration

Shelly is a contributing author on”Surviving Brain Injury: Stories of Strength and Inspiration,” which will be available in mid November 2016. You can order the book by clicking the title. The book includes stories from about 80 brain injury survivors or caregivers.

 

If you would like to be a part of the SPEAK OUT! project, please go to TBI Survivor Interview Questionnaire for a copy of the questions and the release form.

(Clip Art compliments of Bing.)

(Photos compliments of contributor.)

As I say after each post:

Feel free to leave a comment by clicking the blue words “Leave a Comment” below this post.

Please follow my blog. Click on “Follow Me Via eMail” on the right sidebar of your screen.anim0014-1_e0-1

If you like my blog, click the “Like” button under this post.

If you REALLY like my blog, share it intact with your friends. It’s easy! Click the “Share” buttons below.

If you don’t like my blog, “Share” it intact with your enemies. That works for me too!

SPEAK OUT! . . . . . . . . . . . . . Guest Blogger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Deb Angus – Just Blew Me Away

Just Blew Me Away …

by

Deb Angus

presented

by

Donna O’Donnell Figurski

 

Girl Blogger cartoon_picture_of_girl_writingMy husband and I used to be avid bicyclists all throughout the trail system here in Calgary (in Alberta, Canada). Sometimes we would be out and about for the whole day, putting on as much as 50 km (31 miles). Mostly this was back in ‘83 to ‘88. Then we bought a house. The trail system wasn’t as good in that neighbourhood. As a result, we only went sporadically over the following years.

Even that came to an end in 2001, when I sustained a TBI (traumatic brain injury) at the hands of a distracted driver who hit us while we were stopped at a red light. Because of ongoing balance issues, I no longer had the desire to ride my bike again. (So sad the things we lose because of TBI.)

Deb Angus - brain injury survivor and author of “Regaining Consciousness: My Encounter with Mild Brain Injury--the Silent Epidemic"

Deb Angus – brain injury survivor and author of “Regaining Consciousness: My Encounter with Mild Brain Injury–the Silent Epidemic”

Then in 2006, I had an idea about someday getting myself an adult tricycle. That way I would not have to worry about my lack of balancing skills – especially when you have to do a shoulder check (scanning over your shoulder without making the bike swerve). But because we were then living in apartments, storage was an issue. My dream of getting a trike never came to fruition … until this year!

My husband was diagnosed with stage IV colorectal cancer in March 2015. He died April 1, 2016. It has been pretty rough. We had been together for 37 years. I have also been dealing with my own kidney failure since August 2013, and I do peritoneal dialysis every night for 8-9 hours. The waiting list for a transplant in our province is 6-8 years, so I have a ways to go yet. With my husband’s passing, I wanted to start doing things that would get me outside more often and be more active. I also wanted to do something to keep me busy for our wedding anniversary and my birthday, which were coming up on June 30. So I came up with a grand idea that if I could find a “folding” trike, I could then store it in the back of my car. And that is exactly what I’ve done. I wasn’t able to find such a trike locally, so I had to mail-order one and put it together.

Deb Angus - Brain Injury Survivor and her Trike

Deb Angus – Brain Injury Survivor and her Trike

On my very first ride, I drove down to the area of the city where my husband and I used to live back in ‘86 and ‘87. Talk about a trip down memory lane! Within seconds of riding my trike, I felt like I was 32 years old again – whizzing down the tails we used to ride with wind blowing through my helmet and hearing the birds singing and chirping along the way. The freedom I felt at being able to ride again … was fantastic! Then tears came to my eyes because my husband wasn’t here to enjoy this with me …. But as I was heading back to the car after about an hour of riding, I noticed in big letters written in chalk on the asphalt trails the words Love U. I knew then that my husband was there in spirit. I felt that he was so proud and happy that I had finally managed to get my trike and that I will enjoy many more great rides.

 

Thank you, Deb Angus.

Disclaimer:
Any views and opinions of the Guest Blogger are purely his/her own.

(Clip Art compliments of Bing.)

(Photos compliments of Deb Angus.)

As I say after each post: Please leave a comment by clicking the blue words “Leave a Commentanim0014-1_e0-1 below this post.

Feel free to follow my blog. Click on “Follow” on the upper right sidebar.

If you like my blog, share it (intact) with your friends. It’s easy! Click the “Share” buttons below.

If you don’t like my blog, “Share” it (intact) with your enemies. I don’t care!

Feel free to “Like” my post.

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Brain Injury Information and SUPPORT

Women Worldwide

Women around the world share their incredible stories

Brain Aneurysm Global Insight

Brain Aneurysm, cerebral hemorrhaging, hemorrhage stroke

Maybe Crazy Help

Helping others understand mental health in a unique way

catherinelanser.wordpress.com/

Creative Nonfiction, Memoir, and the Brain

One TBI Wife's Journey

TBI Wife's Support

Wrath of Violets

A retrospective documentary of my most inner thoughts: A success in the making

Karen DeBonis

Memoir and creative nonfiction

Surviving TBI

Learning how to survive with spouse's TBI

BQB Publishing

Tomorrow's Best Sellers Today

Knit Neutrality

Knit (Verb) | 'nit : to join together

Ten Thousand Days

The long and winding journey after loss

Wordcrafter9's Blog

Just another WordPress.com weblog

Tripambitions

It contains the world best places and things.

Jumbledbrain

Discover - Empower - Thrive

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