TBI – Survivors, Caregivers, Family, and Friends

Posts tagged ‘Brain Injury Radio Network’

TBI Tales: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I Tripped & Stumbled, but Did Not Fall by Donna O’Donnell Figurski

I Tripped & Stumbled, but Did Not Fall

by

Donna O’Donnell Figurski

Donna O’Donnell Figurski

Recently, as I got out of my car, I stumbled on the curb. Somehow in the darkness, I did not see it. Though the event took less than a second, one thought ran through my head. It was not, “Oh, no! I am going to break a bone or scrape my knee.” It was not, “What a klutz! I’ll ruin my clothes.” And it was not about how embarrassed I would be. All of those possibilities probably would have been my first thoughts – before brain injury entered my life when my husband had a traumatic brain injury in 2005.

Now my mind is only a thought away from brain injury. So, as I tripped and stumbled, but did not fall, my mind raced to, “Please don’t let me hit my head.” I didn’t care how silly I looked or about my clothes being ripped or about getting any broken bones (they would heal). I worried about getting a brain injury. I worried about how a brain injury could change my life forever. I worried that if I were hurt, I could not sufficiently care for my husband, who needs my daily attention. Yes, those thoughts did race through my head in that fleeting second.

It only takes a second for a brain injury to occur. Most brain injuries occur because of an accident. Though we may be aware of the possibility of accidents, they cannot all be avoided. Fortunately, my accident was avoided – just barely. I can only hope that my potential accidents will be few and far apart in the future. I hope yours will be too.

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SPEAK OUT! . . . . . . . . . . . . . Itty-Bitty GIANT Steps!

SPEAK OUT! Itty-Bitty Giant Steps

presented by

Donna O’Donnell Figurski

Itty-Bitty GIant Steps for BlogSPEAK OUT! Itty-Bitty Giant Steps will provide a venue for brain-injury survivors and caregivers to shout out their accomplishments of the week.

If you have an Itty-Bitty Giant Step and you would like to share it, just send an email to me at neelyf@aol.com.

If you are on Facebook, you can simply send a Private Message to me. It need only be a sentence or two. I’ll gather the accomplishments and post them with your name on my blog approximately once a week. (If you do not want your last name to be posted, please tell me in your email or Private Message.)

I hope we have millions of Itty-Bitty Giant Steps.

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David Figurski – Brain Injury Survivor & Donna O’Donnell Figurski

Trash

Donna O’Donnell Figurski (caregiver)I came home from Drama Club ready to take the garbage out.  I was shocked to find that it had already been taken out.  David had done it!  First time since his TBI (traumatic brain injury) twelve years ago! YAY! Can you see my happy dance?Happy Dance

David Grant

David A. Grant – Brain Injury Survivor

David Grant (survivor) It was around two years ago this month that my ability to read returned. Last night, I again fell asleep with a book in my hands. Sure,Mann Reading in Bed my pace is a bit slower, but I’m doing it. Just passed the 300-page mark in an awesome book. (Thanks again, Nick!) I marvel at the fact that I can actually remember a long and complicated plot line, something I was incapable of for years after my accident. How can I not be profoundly grateful?

Note: David is the editor for the e-zine, “TBI Hope & Inspiration.” He is also the author of several books about brain injury. “Metamorphosis, Surviving Brain Injury” and “Slices of Life after Brain Injury

Metamorphosis

Metamorphosis, Surviving Brain Injury

Slices of Life

Slices of Life after Brain Injury

YOU did it!

Congratulations to contributors!

(Clip Art compliments of Bing.)

(Photos compliments of contributors.)

As I say after each post:anim0014-1_e0-1

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TBI Tales: Inspiration . . . . . . . . by Bonni Villarreal (caregiver)

Inspiration

by

Bonni Villarreal (caregiver)

presented by

Donna O’Donnell Figurski

Bonni Villarreal – Caregiver

March 21, 2012, is a day that changed my life forever. It started off like any average day. I got up and went to work. Mike was asleep when I left. I called him around 8:30 that morning to let him know I wouldn’t be at my desk, in case he tried to call me. He sounded fine. Then, just by chance, I happened to be at my desk at 10 am when my phone rang. It was Mike … telling me he was having a stroke.

By the time I got to the house, the ambulance was there. Mike was awake and reaching for me. I didn’t think it was too serious because Mike was alert and talking. But, by the time we got to the hospital, that had changed. The doctor informed me that Mike had a huge blood clot near his cerebellum, and he had to be life-flighted to another hospital because he was too critical to stay at the one he was at.


I had to sign papers for life-saving brain surgery. Mike was in a coma for ten days. We didn’t know if he would wake up, and, if he did, what condition he would be in. When he “woke up,” Mike wasn’t anything like the man I married. He stayed in the hospital for another month, and then he was transferred to a nursing home.

Those days were some of the darkest in my life. They treated Mike as if he were a hopeless case. I wonder what would’ve happened to him if I hadn’t been around.

Mike Villarreal – TBI Survivor

He was tube-fed, couldn’t speak (he wrote instead), and couldn’t walk. He was totally helpless. Plus, he was battling infection after infection. I didn’t think things would ever return to normal.

Fast forward to January 2017 – almost five years post stroke. Mike passed his barium swallow test, and he is having his G-tube removed! He is walking almost unassisted! He is talking! I told Mike, “You are an inspiration. You give hope to people who have lost it, you have renewed hope for people who are about to give up, and you keep hope alive for people who are just starting this long journey.”

Mike wants everyone to know – DON’T EVER, EVER, EVER GIVE UP. No matter if it’s been five, ten, or fifteen years. Keep hope alive! Mike did, and look how far he has come!

As I say after each post: Please leave a comment by clicking the blue words “Leave a Commentanim0014-1_e0-1 below this post.

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TBI Tales . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Twelve Years, But Who’s Counting?

Twelve Years, But Who’s Counting?

by

Donna O’Donnell Figurski

1242232191169820850212_white,_green_rounded_rectangle.svg.med.pngTwelve years! Twelve years ago today, I came as close as a breath to losing my husband and best friend, David. While exercising (a thing he did every day to stay in shape), David did thirteen chin-ups, one more than he had done every other day. That was the proverbial “straw that broke the camel’s back,” or in David’s case, the “chin-up that caused his subarachnoid hemorrhage.” That day, as I rode with him in the ambulance to the hospital, I never realized what lay ahead for us. I never dreamed that this blip would be life-altering. I thought we’d be home by the end of the day, carrying on with life as usual. I was wrong!

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David H. Figurski, Ph.D. – Brain Injury Survivor

David remained in the hospital in the Neuro-Intensive Care Unit (NICU) and the step-down unit at Columbia Presbyterian Hospital (now New York Presbyterian Hospital) for three weeks. While he was there, he was treated to two more brain surgeries – one for an aneurysm and the other for an arterial venous malformation (AVM). He then became a guest at a local rehab hospital for another two months, until insurance wrongly said he was fine to go home.th-1

I am grateful that David is still with me. He wasn’t expected to be. Each surgeon gave me little hope that he would survive any of his surgeries. I’m glad that David proved them all wrong. I’m glad that we have had twelve more years together, and I hope to spend many more with this man whom I have loved since I was sixteen years old.

animated-book

Hopefully, in the sometime future, you will be able to read David’s whole story in my book-in-manuscript, titled “Prisoners Without Bars: A Caregiver’s Tale.”

As I say after each post: Please leave a comment by clicking the blue words “Leave a Commentanim0014-1_e0-1 below this post.

Feel free to follow my blog. Click on “Follow” on the upper right sidebar.

If you like my blog, share intact it with your friends. It’s easy! Click the “Share” buttons below.

If you don’t like my blog, “Share” it intact with your enemies. I don’t care!

Feel free to “Like” my post

SPEAK OUT! . . . . . . . . . . Itty-Bitty GIANT Steps

SPEAK OUT! Itty-Bitty GIANT Steps

presented by

Donna O’Donnell Figurski

Itty-Bitty GIant Steps for BlogSPEAK OUT! Itty-Bitty Giant Steps will provide a venue for brain-injury survivors and caregivers to shout out their accomplishments of the week.

If you have an Itty-Bitty Giant Step and you would like to share it, just send an email to me at neelyf@aol.com.

If you are on Facebook, you can simply send a Private Message to me. It need only be a sentence or two. I’ll gather the accomplishments and post them with your name on my blog approximately once a week. (If you do not want your lastname to be posted, please tell me in your email or Private Message.)

I hope we have millions of Itty-Bitty Giant Steps.

Here is this week’s Itty-Bitty GIANT Step

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Harry Jordan – Brain Injury Survivor

Harry Jordan (survivor) I’ve been blessed with many things in my life, but recently I was in tears. My left foot – on the side I had the stroke on – hasn’t moved since 2009 (pre stroke), but the other way-clipart-waycool2day, I was able to push down and move it! I know I’m being so emotional over something so small, but it’s HUGE TO ME! Maybe I am getting better. Maybe.

 
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simon-limbrick

Simon Limbrick – Brain Injury Survivor

 

 

Simon Limbrick (survivor) It’s been thirty-seven years since my TBI (traumatic brain injury), and I’m now learning that I should not have pulled out of my coma or made all the gains I did. I was determined to bring further improvement to my left eye, which sustained third nerve damage. I was told that I would eventually go blind in it and that I would definitely not be able to move it. In one of my annual eye checks, an optometrist remarked that he had never heard of someone with my condition having the eye improve year after year. In the last twelve months, there has been definite, noticeable vertical movement, as well.  My message to others? IT’S NEVER TOO LATE FOR HEALING!

YOU did it!

Congratulations to contributors!

(Clip Art compliments of Bing.)

(Photos compliments of contributors.)

As I say after each post:anim0014-1_e0-1

Please leave a comment by clicking the blue words “Leave a Comment” below this post.

Feel free to follow my blog. Click on “Follow” on the upper right sidebar.

If you like my blog, share it intact with your friends. It’s easy! Click the “Share” buttons below.

If you don’t like my blog, “Share” it intact with your enemies. I don’t care!

Feel free to “Like” my post.

 

SPEAK OUT! . . . . . . . . . . . . . Faces of Brain Injury . . . . . . . . . Carol Starke-Pyle (caregiver of her son, Thomas)

SPEAK OUT! Faces of Brain Injury – Carol Starke-Pyle

(caregiver of her son, Thomas)

presented

by

Donna O’Donnell Figurski

Brain Injury is NOT Discriminating!

bigstock-cartoon-face-vector-people-25671746-e1348136261718It can happen to anyone, anytime, . . . and anywhere.

The Brain Trauma Foundation states that there are 5.3 million people in the United States living with some form of brain injury.

On “Faces of Brain Injury,” you will meet survivors living with brain injury. I hope that their stories will help you to understand the serious implications and complications of brain injury.

The stories on SPEAK OUT! Faces of Brain Injury are published with the permission of the survivor or designated caregiver.

If you would like your story to be published, please send a short account and two photos to me at neelyf@aol.com. I’d love to publish your story and raise awareness for Brain Injury.

Carol Starke-Pyle (caregiver of her son, Thomas)

carol-starke-pyle-1

Carolyn Starke-Pyle – Caregiver for Brain Injury Survivor

 

This is my son’s story. Thomas was 43. He trained/rode horses for a living. He was very athletic, vivacious, funny, etc. He came to visit me one Sunday, and, as the day wore on, he became more and more delusional. I called an ambulance. My son knew his name, knew where he was, and walked to the ambulance. I followed to the Emergency Room. I was able to see Thomas twenty minutes later, as he was waiting in the cubicle. He could not talk – he babbled incoherently. He could not sit up or walk. He didn’t know me. He was admitted and was given many tests: a CT (computerized tomography) scan, an MRI (magnetic resonance imaging), and a spinal tap. The CDC (Centers for Disease Control) was called in. It was concluded that Thomas had brain damage. After two weeks, Thomas was transferred to a neurological center. He didn’t know how to swallow, he knew NO ONE, he was in a huge crib, and he was in diapers. More the-brain-hispinal taps and more MRIs. I was told his frontal lobe looked as if a bag of M&Ms had been tossed into it. Infectious/viral disease had been ruled out. It was determined that, due to numerous concussions from falls off horses, his brain had suffered too much damage – which was IRREVERSIBLE! I collapsed when his doctor said, “The Thomas you knew a month ago is no longer with us.” He continued to tell me that my vibrant son would need a nursing home for the rest of his life.

I went onto Facebook and shared my anguish and pleaded for prayers. A prayer chain encircled the globe. Meanwhile, I attended TBI (traumatic brain injury) seminars and met with social workers and more doctors to find a special nursing home for Thomas. Two months later, on my visit, his nurse grinned and said she had a surprise. Thomas was standing up! The next week, he was walking, then talking (he made little sense, but … !), then recognizing us, and then eating by himself. As I was a teacher, I chose to stick up all sorts of stimuli – photos of family, friends, pets, and horses. horse_adoptable_bay_animated_by_hikari_yumi-d5hrf17Thomas slowly improved (contrary to the opinions of ALL specialists). After four months, with short-term memory loss and some loss of intelligence, Thomas was released. I asked his doctor to explain. He looked at me and quietly said, “It is a miracle!”

My son is back to work with horses, has absolutely NO memory of the hospital, has a touch believe-clip-art-at-clker-com-vector-clip-art-online-royalty-free-qep8hi-clipartof short-term memory loss, and is as bright as he always was. BELIEVE IN MIRACLES! I am praying for YOU ALL!

 

(Disclaimer: The views or opinions in this post are solely that of the interviewee.)

If you would like to be a part of the SPEAK OUT! project, please go to TBI SPEAK OUT! Caregiver Interview Questionnaire for a copy of the questions and the release form.

(Clip Art compliments of Bing.)

As I say after each post: Please leave a comment by clicking the blue words “Leave a Commentanim0014-1_e0-1 below this post.

Feel free to follow my blog. Click on “Follow” on the upper right sidebar.

If you like my blog, share it with your friends. It’s easy! Click the “Share” buttons below.

If you don’t like my blog, “Share” it with your enemies. I don’t care!

Feel free to “Like” my post.

Survivors SPEAK OUT! Richard Schooping

Survivors SPEAK OUT!    Richard Schooping

presented by

Donna O’Donnell Figurski

Richard Schooping - Brain Injury Survivor

Richard Schooping – Brain Injury Survivor

1. What is your name? (last name optional)

Richard Schooping

2. Where do you live? (city and/or state and/or country) Email (optional)

Orlando, Florida, USA     apebblethrown@gmail.com

3. On what date did you have your brain injury? At what age?

I was 44.

4. How did your brain injury occur?

A mysterious brain infection from AIDS attacked my entire brain and spinal cord.

5. When did you (or someone) first realize you had a problem?

My functions in my mind and body began to slow down. Typing and talking slowed to zero over the period of a month. I watched it happen from a shattering mirror of identity.

6. What kind of emergency treatment, if any, did you have?patient-in-hospital

I was put in the hospital on liquid experimental medications to slow the attack of the mysterious virus. Also, I was on oxygen therapies to raise my blood-oxygen level. Doctors had never seen anything like this. I was also informed I had aphasia.

7. Were you in a coma? If so, how long?

No. I was awake and asleep intermittently for days.

8. Did you do rehab? What kind of rehab (i.e., inpatient or outpatient and occupational and/or physical and/or speech and/or other)? How long were you in rehab?

I was in a nursing home for three weeks of intense rehabilitative therapy. Then I had occupational therapy for as long as insurance would cover it – about three months.

9. What problems or disabilities, if any, resulted from your brain injury (e.g., balance, perception, personality, etc.)?

Richard Schooping - Brain Injury Survivor

Richard Schooping – Brain Injury Survivor

I seemed to lose everything. I had no idea who I was during the infection. I lost my ability to swallow, my speech functions, and all motor functions. I atrophied so quickly over a few weeks that I became immobile and rail thin. Bladder control also became an issue, as well as balance and perceptions. But, I am blessed – most of everything has returned. I also worked incredibly hard to survive and shine for others.

10. How has your life changed? Is it better? Is it worse?

My life is truly hard, but it’s also amazing. I am not able to work. I take care of my mother, which could not have happened without this stroke. My days are unpredictable – my energy can wane quickly without warning. Arthritis and neuropathy and HIV dementia fill my days, as well as domestic duties while my husband works. I am creative daily in some aspect. I add inspirations to Facebook. I am grateful. I know I am more than this body. I am an eternal spirit. I feel aware and know that I am more.

11. What do you miss the most from your pre-brain-injury life?

I miss writing music, freedom of body and mind, fluidity of speech, my handwriting, and self-reliance.

12. What do you enjoy most in your post-brain-injury life?

My compassion has deepened and expanded in my life in ways unimagined. I embrace and deepen into being a source of inspiration and hope for others. I enjoy volunteering; creating digital pieces of heART; having quality time for my sister, Laurie; and having time with my cat, Autumn. I also enjoy singing.

13. What do you like least about your brain injury?

I dislike feeling caged in my body, not being able to do what I once could do effortlessly, and my speech and motor functions being so affected, but I have faith.

14. Has anything helped you to accept your brain injury?

Several things have helped me: meditation, Qi Gong, chanting, forgiveness, singing, playing, and serving others.

Richard Schooping - Brain Injury Survivor

Richard Schooping – Brain Injury Survivor

15. Has your injury affected your home life and relationships and, if so, how?

Yes. I feel it confused and bewildered all of my friends. Many fell away, and I do not blame them. This is my journey. My marriage to my amazing husband is withstanding the strain this stroke has brought into our lives. My family is very supportive. We have all become stronger and more caring people.

16. Has your social life been altered or changed and, if so, how?

Yes. My social life is only what I make happen now. It still takes effort to talk and think, but many new friends have opened their hearts to me and accept me as I AM.

17. Who is your main caregiver? Do you understand what it takes to be a caregiver?

My husband, Cal Kalaf, is my main caregiver. I do know what caregiving means. I understand in that I helped three previous husbands pass over from AIDS.

18. What are your plans? What do you expect/hope to be doing ten years from now?

"From Suffering to Soaring" by Richard Schooping

“From Suffering to Soaring” by Richard Schooping

I will share my story of hope through my first book, “From Suffering to Soaring.” I will offer insights and strength to as many souls as possible. I plan to tour and to write more books. I will finish my second book, which shares both my and my husband’s perspectives of the stroke. I hope to write more albums as well. I want to make the most of my time while I am still here.

19. Are you able to provide a helpful hint that may have taken you a long time to learn, but which you wished you had known earlier? If so, please state what it is to potentially help other survivors with your specific kind of brain injury.

Don’t judge the stroke or disease. Things happen. There are huge patterns at play. Respond with caring and self-love. Nutrition is important. We are what we eat. This is good advice for all of our senses.

20.What advice would you offer to other brain-injury survivors? Do you have any other comments that you would like to add?

Richard Schooping - Brain Injury Survivor

Richard Schooping – Brain Injury Survivor

Find a creative outlet.

Get out in nature more.

Simplify your life.

Honor the entire process.

When emotions rise and attempt to capsize you, become aware of your breath and breathe through them.

Emotions are only energy.

Energy is neutral.

Look into mindfulness meditation.

Keep the faith.

Don’t blame.

Do whatever calms you.

This too shall pass.

Share your story.

 

(Disclaimer: The views or opinions in this post are solely that of the interviewee.)

If you would like to be a part of the SPEAK OUT! project, please go to TBI SPEAK OUT! Caregiver Interview Questionnaire for a copy of the questions and the release form.

(Clip Art compliments of Bing.)

As I say after each post: Please leave a comment by clicking the blue words “Leave a Commentanim0014-1_e0-1 below this post.

Feel free to follow my blog. Click on “Follow” on the upper right sidebar.

If you like my blog, share it with your friends. It’s easy! Click the “Share” buttons below.

If you don’t like my blog, “Share” it with your enemies. I don’t care!

Feel free to “Like” my post.

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No memory of the day that changed my life

My name is Michelle Munt and this is my story about surviving a brain injury and what I continue to learn about it. This is for other survivors and their loved ones, but also to raise awareness of what can happen to those in an accident. This invisible injury too often goes undiagnosed and it can be difficult to find information about it. I will talk about things that have helped me as I continue to recover and invite others to see if it works for them too.

Everything and nothing. GM1123 😊

Bienvenue. I’m thinking this is the spot where I am to write a witty, flowery personal section that pulls you in......I got nuthin’

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