TBI – Survivors, Caregivers, Family, and Friends

Posts tagged ‘TBI Caregiver’

TBI Tales: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A Messy Kitchen & Fruit Salad

 

A Messy Kitchen
by
Michael Puffer (caregiver for his wife, Maria)
presented by
Donna O’Donnell Figurski

 

Puffer. Michael & Mari a

Maria Puffer – Brain Injury Survivor Michael Puffer – Caregiver for Maria

I came home after a long day and found what looked like a mess in the kitchen. I sat down and put my face in my hands and cried. I couldn’t believe what I came home to. I wasn’t angry, but I couldn’t stop the tears.

Twenty-three months ago, the state of the kitchen would not have been a remarkable finding. Tonight, it was truly unbelievable, and I was blown away!Messy Kitchen

Just under two years ago, I thought I had lost the most important person in my life. My loving wife, Maria Puffer, was in a horrific car accident. She suffered a severe traumatic brain injury and a spinal cord contusion, and she was in a coma at North Memorial Hospital near Minneapolis.

Ever since that day, Maria has fought to show us she is still with us and she is ever-determined to recover and get her life back. Week by week, day by day, hour by hour – she never quits, complains, or feels sorry for herself. Maria practices walking with a walker an hour a day, sometimes nearly falling asleep because she always wants to push herself. She thanks me every night for taking care of her. She shows all of us what true grit and love is.

Fruit_salad_clipartMaria asked me a few days ago where the Kitchen Aid mixer was. I told her it was in the pantry. The next day – there it was on the counter. Maria asked daughter Samantha to pick up the ingredients to make fruit salad. I told her we would make fruit salad over the weekend, but there never was time to do it.

Maria didn’t wait. She made the fruit salad by herself.

My tears were tears of joy and wonder. When she came into the kitchen, I reached out, gave her a huge hug, and said, “You are awesome!” (Maria is absolutely the strongest person I’ll ever know. I can’t believe how lucky I am to be in her life!)Man & Woman Hugging

We had dinner together and enjoyed the very best fruit salad in the world for desert.

I will try forever to be the best husband that I can be. I know I have the best wife, and she deserves the best from me.

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TBI Tales: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I Tripped & Stumbled, but Did Not Fall by Donna O’Donnell Figurski

I Tripped & Stumbled, but Did Not Fall

by

Donna O’Donnell Figurski

Donna O’Donnell Figurski

Recently, as I got out of my car, I stumbled on the curb. Somehow in the darkness, I did not see it. Though the event took less than a second, one thought ran through my head. It was not, “Oh, no! I am going to break a bone or scrape my knee.” It was not, “What a klutz! I’ll ruin my clothes.” And it was not about how embarrassed I would be. All of those possibilities probably would have been my first thoughts – before brain injury entered my life when my husband had a traumatic brain injury in 2005.

Now my mind is only a thought away from brain injury. So, as I tripped and stumbled, but did not fall, my mind raced to, “Please don’t let me hit my head.” I didn’t care how silly I looked or about my clothes being ripped or about getting any broken bones (they would heal). I worried about getting a brain injury. I worried about how a brain injury could change my life forever. I worried that if I were hurt, I could not sufficiently care for my husband, who needs my daily attention. Yes, those thoughts did race through my head in that fleeting second.

It only takes a second for a brain injury to occur. Most brain injuries occur because of an accident. Though we may be aware of the possibility of accidents, they cannot all be avoided. Fortunately, my accident was avoided – just barely. I can only hope that my potential accidents will be few and far apart in the future. I hope yours will be too.

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SPEAK OUT! . . . . . . . . . . . . . Itty-Bitty GIANT Steps!

SPEAK OUT! Itty-Bitty Giant Steps

presented by

Donna O’Donnell Figurski

Itty-Bitty GIant Steps for BlogSPEAK OUT! Itty-Bitty Giant Steps will provide a venue for brain-injury survivors and caregivers to shout out their accomplishments of the week.

If you have an Itty-Bitty Giant Step and you would like to share it, just send an email to me at neelyf@aol.com.

If you are on Facebook, you can simply send a Private Message to me. It need only be a sentence or two. I’ll gather the accomplishments and post them with your name on my blog approximately once a week. (If you do not want your last name to be posted, please tell me in your email or Private Message.)

I hope we have millions of Itty-Bitty Giant Steps.

Donna-David-1 copy

David Figurski – Brain Injury Survivor & Donna O’Donnell Figurski

Trash

Donna O’Donnell Figurski (caregiver)I came home from Drama Club ready to take the garbage out.  I was shocked to find that it had already been taken out.  David had done it!  First time since his TBI (traumatic brain injury) twelve years ago! YAY! Can you see my happy dance?Happy Dance

David Grant

David A. Grant – Brain Injury Survivor

David Grant (survivor) It was around two years ago this month that my ability to read returned. Last night, I again fell asleep with a book in my hands. Sure,Mann Reading in Bed my pace is a bit slower, but I’m doing it. Just passed the 300-page mark in an awesome book. (Thanks again, Nick!) I marvel at the fact that I can actually remember a long and complicated plot line, something I was incapable of for years after my accident. How can I not be profoundly grateful?

Note: David is the editor for the e-zine, “TBI Hope & Inspiration.” He is also the author of several books about brain injury. “Metamorphosis, Surviving Brain Injury” and “Slices of Life after Brain Injury

Metamorphosis

Metamorphosis, Surviving Brain Injury

Slices of Life

Slices of Life after Brain Injury

YOU did it!

Congratulations to contributors!

(Clip Art compliments of Bing.)

(Photos compliments of contributors.)

As I say after each post:anim0014-1_e0-1

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TBI Tales: Inspiration . . . . . . . . by Bonni Villarreal (caregiver)

Inspiration

by

Bonni Villarreal (caregiver)

presented by

Donna O’Donnell Figurski

Bonni Villarreal – Caregiver

March 21, 2012, is a day that changed my life forever. It started off like any average day. I got up and went to work. Mike was asleep when I left. I called him around 8:30 that morning to let him know I wouldn’t be at my desk, in case he tried to call me. He sounded fine. Then, just by chance, I happened to be at my desk at 10 am when my phone rang. It was Mike … telling me he was having a stroke.

By the time I got to the house, the ambulance was there. Mike was awake and reaching for me. I didn’t think it was too serious because Mike was alert and talking. But, by the time we got to the hospital, that had changed. The doctor informed me that Mike had a huge blood clot near his cerebellum, and he had to be life-flighted to another hospital because he was too critical to stay at the one he was at.


I had to sign papers for life-saving brain surgery. Mike was in a coma for ten days. We didn’t know if he would wake up, and, if he did, what condition he would be in. When he “woke up,” Mike wasn’t anything like the man I married. He stayed in the hospital for another month, and then he was transferred to a nursing home.

Those days were some of the darkest in my life. They treated Mike as if he were a hopeless case. I wonder what would’ve happened to him if I hadn’t been around.

Mike Villarreal – TBI Survivor

He was tube-fed, couldn’t speak (he wrote instead), and couldn’t walk. He was totally helpless. Plus, he was battling infection after infection. I didn’t think things would ever return to normal.

Fast forward to January 2017 – almost five years post stroke. Mike passed his barium swallow test, and he is having his G-tube removed! He is walking almost unassisted! He is talking! I told Mike, “You are an inspiration. You give hope to people who have lost it, you have renewed hope for people who are about to give up, and you keep hope alive for people who are just starting this long journey.”

Mike wants everyone to know – DON’T EVER, EVER, EVER GIVE UP. No matter if it’s been five, ten, or fifteen years. Keep hope alive! Mike did, and look how far he has come!

As I say after each post: Please leave a comment by clicking the blue words “Leave a Commentanim0014-1_e0-1 below this post.

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Caregivers SPEAK OUT! . . . . . Lori Strauss Heckman

Caregivers  SPEAK OUT!  Lori Strauss Heckman

(caregiver for her son, Bartholomew Wayne Nathaniel),

presented by

Donna O’Donnell Figurski

lori-strauss-heckman-caregiver-012017Three years ago, our lives were turned upside down when my then 21-year-old son had his accident. It has been a long road with many hurdles to overcome, but I am so proud of him. He is my hero and my greatest blessing. And, proof to never give up. We were told that he would probably not make it that night. We were also informed that, if he did, he would not have any quality of life. But, he proved everyone wrong! Many prayers were prayed and many tears were shed, and my son is still with us – and doing very well. The first and second photos are of my son after the accident; the third is him wearing a helmet in recovery; and the fourth photo is of him with his car. (Yes, my son is driving, and his seizures are under control.)

Meet Bartholomew Wayne Nathaniel

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(Disclaimer: The views or opinions in this post are solely that of the interviewee.)

If you would like to be a part of the SPEAK OUT! project, please go to TBI SPEAK OUT! Caregiver Interview Questionnaire for a copy of the questions and the release form.

(Clip Art compliments of Bing.)

As I say after each post: Please leave a comment by clicking the blue words “Leave a Commentanim0014-1_e0-1 below this post.

Feel free to follow my blog. Click on “Follow” on the upper right sidebar.

If you like my blog, share it with your friends. It’s easy! Click the “Share” buttons below.

If you don’t like my blog, “Share” it with your enemies. I don’t care!

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SPEAK OUT! . . . . . . . . . . . . . Faces of Brain Injury . . . . . . . . . Carol Starke-Pyle (caregiver of her son, Thomas)

SPEAK OUT! Faces of Brain Injury – Carol Starke-Pyle

(caregiver of her son, Thomas)

presented

by

Donna O’Donnell Figurski

Brain Injury is NOT Discriminating!

bigstock-cartoon-face-vector-people-25671746-e1348136261718It can happen to anyone, anytime, . . . and anywhere.

The Brain Trauma Foundation states that there are 5.3 million people in the United States living with some form of brain injury.

On “Faces of Brain Injury,” you will meet survivors living with brain injury. I hope that their stories will help you to understand the serious implications and complications of brain injury.

The stories on SPEAK OUT! Faces of Brain Injury are published with the permission of the survivor or designated caregiver.

If you would like your story to be published, please send a short account and two photos to me at neelyf@aol.com. I’d love to publish your story and raise awareness for Brain Injury.

Carol Starke-Pyle (caregiver of her son, Thomas)

carol-starke-pyle-1

Carolyn Starke-Pyle – Caregiver for Brain Injury Survivor

 

This is my son’s story. Thomas was 43. He trained/rode horses for a living. He was very athletic, vivacious, funny, etc. He came to visit me one Sunday, and, as the day wore on, he became more and more delusional. I called an ambulance. My son knew his name, knew where he was, and walked to the ambulance. I followed to the Emergency Room. I was able to see Thomas twenty minutes later, as he was waiting in the cubicle. He could not talk – he babbled incoherently. He could not sit up or walk. He didn’t know me. He was admitted and was given many tests: a CT (computerized tomography) scan, an MRI (magnetic resonance imaging), and a spinal tap. The CDC (Centers for Disease Control) was called in. It was concluded that Thomas had brain damage. After two weeks, Thomas was transferred to a neurological center. He didn’t know how to swallow, he knew NO ONE, he was in a huge crib, and he was in diapers. More the-brain-hispinal taps and more MRIs. I was told his frontal lobe looked as if a bag of M&Ms had been tossed into it. Infectious/viral disease had been ruled out. It was determined that, due to numerous concussions from falls off horses, his brain had suffered too much damage – which was IRREVERSIBLE! I collapsed when his doctor said, “The Thomas you knew a month ago is no longer with us.” He continued to tell me that my vibrant son would need a nursing home for the rest of his life.

I went onto Facebook and shared my anguish and pleaded for prayers. A prayer chain encircled the globe. Meanwhile, I attended TBI (traumatic brain injury) seminars and met with social workers and more doctors to find a special nursing home for Thomas. Two months later, on my visit, his nurse grinned and said she had a surprise. Thomas was standing up! The next week, he was walking, then talking (he made little sense, but … !), then recognizing us, and then eating by himself. As I was a teacher, I chose to stick up all sorts of stimuli – photos of family, friends, pets, and horses. horse_adoptable_bay_animated_by_hikari_yumi-d5hrf17Thomas slowly improved (contrary to the opinions of ALL specialists). After four months, with short-term memory loss and some loss of intelligence, Thomas was released. I asked his doctor to explain. He looked at me and quietly said, “It is a miracle!”

My son is back to work with horses, has absolutely NO memory of the hospital, has a touch believe-clip-art-at-clker-com-vector-clip-art-online-royalty-free-qep8hi-clipartof short-term memory loss, and is as bright as he always was. BELIEVE IN MIRACLES! I am praying for YOU ALL!

 

(Disclaimer: The views or opinions in this post are solely that of the interviewee.)

If you would like to be a part of the SPEAK OUT! project, please go to TBI SPEAK OUT! Caregiver Interview Questionnaire for a copy of the questions and the release form.

(Clip Art compliments of Bing.)

As I say after each post: Please leave a comment by clicking the blue words “Leave a Commentanim0014-1_e0-1 below this post.

Feel free to follow my blog. Click on “Follow” on the upper right sidebar.

If you like my blog, share it with your friends. It’s easy! Click the “Share” buttons below.

If you don’t like my blog, “Share” it with your enemies. I don’t care!

Feel free to “Like” my post.

Survivor/Caregiver ………… SPEAK OUT! Cyndy Davy Feasel, wife of Grant Feasel

Survivors/Caregivers  SPEAK OUT! 

Cyndy Davy Feasel, wife of Grant Feasel

presented by

Donna O’Donnell Figurski

Note: This interview is by Cyndy Feasel, the wife of Grant Feasel, who died of brain disease obtained from playing football. Some answers apply to Cyndy, and some, to Grant. I have made it obvious to whom the answer applies.

 

Cyndy Davy Feasel - spouse of Grant Feasel, a former Seattle Seahawks Center

Cyndy Davy Feasel – spouse of Grant Feasel, a former Seattle Seahawks Center

1. What is your name? (last name optional)

My name is Cyndy Davy Feasel, wife of Grant Feasel, who succumbed to brain disease.

2.Where do you live? (city and/or state and/or country) Email (optional)

Ft. Worth, Texas, USA

3. On what date did you have your brain injury? At what age?

There was no single event that was responsible for Grant’s brain injury. It occurred from years of playing football. Concussions had a role.

4. How did your brain injury occur?

Playing football (See the answer to the previous question.)

5. When did you (or someone) first realize you had a problem?

We knew Grant had a problem about age 40.

6. What kind of emergency treatment, if any, did you have?

Grant Feasel, former Seattle Seahawks Center diagnosed with CTE

Grant Feasel, former Seattle Seahawks Center diagnosed with CTE

None. Grant used drugs and alcohol to numb the pain.

7. Were you in a coma? If so, how long?

Grant was never in a coma.

8. Did you do rehab? What kind of rehab (i.e., inpatient or outpatient and occupational and/or physical and/or speech and/or other)? How long were you in rehab?

No

9. What problems or disabilities, if any, resulted from your brain injury
(e.g., balance, perception, personality, etc.)?

Grant had some speech difficulties. He stuttered often and repeated himself as the CTE (chronic traumatic encephalopathy) worsened. Grant also had problems with his vision and balance. His personality changed over the years. He had difficulty thinking and completing tasks. He showed impulsive behavior, irritability, and aggression towards me!

10. How has your life changed? Is it better? Is it worse?

(No answer)

11. What do you miss the most from your pre-brain-injury life?

Cyndy: I miss my normal family life.

12. What do you enjoy most in your post-brain-injury life?

(No answer)

13. What do you like least about your brain injury?

Cyndy Davy Feasel and spouse, Grant Feasel former Seattle Seahawk

Cyndy Davy Feasel and spouse, Grant Feasel former Seattle Seahawk

Cyndy: Grant died in 2012. I miss who he was when we met in 1982.

14. Has anything helped you to accept your brain injury?

Cyndy: Raising awareness is helping to ease the pain of a lost life.

15. Has your injury affected your home life and relationships and, if so, how?

Cyndy: My family was destroyed.

16. Has your social life been altered or changed and, if so, how?

Cyndy: I was sad for years about the life I lost in the midst of Grant’s brain damage.

17. Who is your main caregiver? Do you understand what it takes to be a caregiver?

(No answer)

18. What are your plans? What do you expect/hope to be doing ten years from now?

Cyndy: I intend to be an advocate who increases awareness about concussions and brain injury.

After the Cheering Stops by Cyndy Davy Feasel

“After the Cheering Stops” by Cyndy Davy Feasel

19. Are you able to provide a helpful hint that may have taken you a long time to learn, but which you wished you had known earlier? If so, please state what it is to potentially help other survivors with your specific kind of brain injury.

Cyndy: Educate yourself! Please ask your doctor for his or her opinion about your child’s safety before your child plays a head-banging sport.

20. What advice would you offer to other brain-injury survivors? Do you have any other comments that you would like to add?

Cyndy: Seek knowledge! Find a group for support.

 

(Disclaimer: The views or opinions in this post are solely that of the interviewee.)

If you would like to be a part of the SPEAK OUT! project, please go to TBI SPEAK OUT! Caregiver Interview Questionnaire for a copy of the questions and the release form.

(Clip Art compliments of Bing.)

 

As I say after each post: Please leave a comment by clicking the blue words “Leave a Commentanim0014-1_e0-1 below this post.

Feel free to follow my blog. Click on “Follow” on the upper right sidebar.

If you like my blog, share it with your friends. It’s easy! Click the “Share” buttons below.

If you don’t like my blog, “Share” it with your enemies. I don’t care!

Feel free to “Like” my post.

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