TBI – Survivors, Caregivers, Family, and Friends

Posts tagged ‘caregiver’

New NEWS: . . . . . . . 2019 Caregiving Visionary Award Finalist

New News:    2019 Caregiving Visionary Award Finalist

presented by

Donna O’Donnell Figurski

th-1YAY! I am one of ten finalists for the 2019 Caregiving Visionary caregiver-word-clipart-1Award, so I’m still in the running. A great big THANK YOU to all who voted for me. Your votes helped immensely. YOU made this happen and I am so honored to be a finalist. Winners will be announced March 1st.

Thank you! Thank you! Thank you! THANK YOU!

 

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SPEAK OUT! NewsBit . . . . . . VOTE for Me! – Caregiver Visionary Award

VOTE for Me! – Caregiver Visionary Award

presented by

Donna O’Donnell Figurski

This is just an itty-bitty, tiny-teeny, itsy-bitsy newsletter because I want to share some exciting news with you.

I have been nominated for the “Caregiver Visionary Award,” which will honor five th-1caregivers who stand out in their caregiver world. Now frankly, I think all caregivers deserve this award, but, alas, only five will be chosen, and I hope I am one of them. David thinks I should be too. He nominated me.

I need your help. Only you can make this happen. Here’s how it works. In order to be chosen as one of the top ten finalists, I need votes. Internet votes! That’s it. Pretty easy. All you have to do is click on the link I posted below.

https://www.caregiving.com/ncc19/cva-donna-odonnell-figurski/

Voting ends at Midnight ET on February 25, 2019. So please HURRY!

Scroll to the end of my nomination.
Click on “Cast your vote.”
Takes you to a new page
Lists all nomineesplease-vote
Mark my name, Donna O’Donnell Figurski.
Click “VOTE!

See, that wasn’t so hard, was it?

On March 1, 2019, the winners will be announced. You’ll probably know right away because you will hear me squealing and jumping for joy. And now, I am going to cross my fingers until March 1st. pco5aerzi

ashdis kjdihio jsh pogwkp d wyqye. Oops! It’s really hard to type with crossed fingers.

Translation : Thank you so much from the bottom of my heart!

P.S. Phew! Thank goodness that’s done. I hate to ask for things!

 

(Clip Art compliments of Bing.)

As I say after each post: Please leave a comment by clicking the blue words “Leave a Commentanim0014-1_e0-1 below this post.

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Caregivers SPEAK OUT! . . . . Malissa Mallett (caregiver for her son)

Caregivers SPEAK OUT!

Malissa Mallett (caregiver for her son)

presented by

Donna O’Donnell Figurski

“Malissa Mallett will be my guest tomorrow (Sunday, February 17) on my radio show (Another Fork in the Road) on the Brain Injury Radio Network. She has been caregiver for her son, who had an anoxic brain injury, since 1997, when he was an infant. Malissa is Program Director for the Brain Injury Alliance of Arizona (BIAAZ). We will discuss caring for her son and the effect of her expertise (opioid use on the brain.) My show broadcasts live at 5:30 PT (blogtalkradio.com/braininjuryradio), or it can be heard as a podcast anytime (https://survivingtraumaticbraininjury.com/category/on-the-air-show-menu/).”

Malissa Mallett

1. What is your name? (last name optional)

Malissa Mallett

2. Where do you live? (city and/or state and/or country) Email? (optional)

Laveen, Arizona, USA     Program@biaaz.org

3. What is the brain-injury survivor’s relationship to you? How old was the survivor when he/she had the brain injury? What caused your survivor’s brain injury?

The survivor is my son. He was 2 months old. His brain injury was caused by aspiration, causing him to stop breathing (anoxic brain injury).

4. On what date did you begin care for your brain-injury survivor? Were you the main caregiver? Are you now? How old were you when you began care?

My care began in April 1997. I was 22 years old. I was my son’s main caregiver then, but I’m not now.

th

Babies get brain injury too

5. Were you caring for anyone else at that time (e.g., children, parents, etc.)?

No

6. Were you employed at the time of your survivor’s brain injury? If so, were you able to continue working?

I had just returned to work after giving birth. I was not able to continue working, since my son required 24-hour supervision for his heart and lung monitor.

7. Did you have any help? If so, what kind and for how long?

Occasionally. My family, who were trained in CPR, would care for my son to give me a break or a night out.

cartoon-hospital8. When did your support of the survivor begin (e.g., immediately – in the hospital; when the survivor returned home; etc.)?

In the hospital

9. Was your survivor in a coma? If so, what did you do during that time?

No

10. Did your survivor have rehab? If so, what kind of rehab (i.e., inpatient and/or outpatient and occupational, physical, speech, and/or other)? How long was the rehab? Where were you when your survivor was getting therapy?

No

11. What problems or disabilities of your brain-injury survivor required your care, if any?

This is difficult to answer given my son’s age at the time of his brain injury.

12. How has your life changed since you became a caregiver? Is it better? Is it worse?

My life was challenging all throughout my son’s life.

13. What do you miss the most from pre-brain-injury life?

I will never know what could have been.

14. What do you enjoy most in post-brain-injury life?

Does not apply

15. What do you like least about brain injury?

shakilaramanwordpresscom

Learn about brain injury

The lack of understanding in the community

16. Has anything helped you to accept your survivor’s brain injury?

Yes. Education.

17. Has your survivor’s injury affected your home life and relationships and, if so, how?

Yes, it has. We can discuss this on your radio show. It’s too much to explain here.

18. Has your social life been altered or changed and, if so, how?

Not anymore

19. What are your plans? What do you expect/hope to be doing ten years from now?

I would love for my son to be successful and independent.

20. What advice would you offer other caregivers of brain-injury survivors? Do you have any other comments that you would like to add?

supportTake care of yourself.

Be surrounded by supportive people.

Educate yourself.

 

(Clip Art compliments of Bing.)

As I say after each post: Please leave a comment by clicking the blue words “Leave a Commentanim0014-1_e0-1 below this post.

Feel free to follow my blog. Click on “Follow” on the upper right sidebar.

If you like my blog, share it (intact) with your friends. It’s easy! Click the “Share” buttons below.

If you don’t like my blog, “Share” it (intact) with your enemies. I don’t care!

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TBI Tales . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . This Song Could Be a Caregiver’s Anthem

This Song Could Be a Caregiver’s Anthem

by

Donna O’Donnell Figurski

David & Donna Aunt Irene's Funeral 060718

 

I happened to hear this old hit song (“Lean on Me”) a couple of days ago. After listening to the lyrics, I realized it reflects what we caregivers do. We just want to help.

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We don’t look this bad.

As the song implies, we give much-needed help. “Lean on Me” could be our anthem. Give it a listen.

PS. I just had to dance with this man to that song and we each did a bit of “leaning on.”

 

(Disclaimer: The views or opinions in this post are solely that of the author.)

If you have a story to share and would like to be a part of the SPEAK OUT! project, please submit your TBI Tale to me at neelyf@aol.com. I will publish as many stories as I can.

As I say after each post:

Please leave a comment by clicking the blue words “Leave a Comment” below this post.anim0014-1_e0-1

Please follow my blog. Click on “Follow” on the top right sidebar. (It’s nice to know there are readers out there.)

If you like my blog, share it with your friends. It’s easy! Click the “Share” buttons below.

If you don’t like my blog, “Share” it with your enemies. I don’t care!

Feel free to “Like” my post.

(Clip Art compliments of Bing.)

 

Caregivers SPEAK OUT! . . . . . Charity Hamilton (caregiver for momma)

Caregivers  SPEAK OUT!  Charity Hamilton

(caregiver for her momma)

presented by

Donna O’Donnell Figurski

 

Charity Hamilton – Caregiver for her Momma

1. What is your name? (last name optional)

Charity Hamilton

2. Where do you live? (city and/or state and/or country) Email? (optional)

Shippensburg, Pennsylvania, USA

3. What is the brain-injury survivor’s relationship to you?

The survivor is my momma. 🙂

How old was the survivor when he/she had the brain injury? What caused your survivor’s brain injury?

My mother’s affliction is brain cancer and seizures. It was diagnosed in 2012 when she was seen after a car accident. (She didn’t remember what happened.) The hospital was going to let her leave, but we demanded a CT (computerized tomography) scan and an MRI (magnetic resonance imaging), as her husband (now deceased) knew something was wrong. That’s when the cancer was found. It had apparently started as a child!

4. On what date did you begin care for your brain-injury survivor? Were you the main caregiver? Are you now? How old were you when you began care?

I became my mother’s only caregiver in 2016, as her husband helped care for her, but he recently passed due to bad health. I am now her full-time caregiver. I am 24.

5. Were you caring for anyone else at that time (e.g., children, parents, etc.)?

I have three beautiful children of my own, whom I care for.

6. Were you employed at the time of your survivor’s brain injury? If so, were you able to continue working?

I was then and am now a full-time employee.

7. Did you have any help? If so, what kind and for how long?

I had no help after my mother’s husband passed.

8. When did your support of the survivor begin (e.g., immediately – in the hospital; when the survivor returned home; etc.)?

I began care immediately after my mother was diagnosed.

9. Was your survivor in a coma? If so, what did you do during that time?

No

10. Did your survivor have rehab? If so, what kind of rehab (i.e., inpatient and/or outpatient and occupational, physical, speech, and/or other)? How long was the rehab? Where were you when your survivor was getting therapy?

My mother had no rehab.

11. What problems or disabilities of your brain-injury survivor required your care, if any?

My care was needed whenever my mother had seizures. I also helped her deal with memory loss. I assisted her with medications, and I helped her with showers.

12. How has your life changed since you became a caregiver? Is it better? Is it worse?

With everything I have on my plate, my life is complicated and very busy. Only brain-injury-caregivers truly understand.

13. What do you miss the most from pre-brain-injury life?

I miss not being so busy!

14. What do you enjoy most in p

Charity Hamilton – Caregiver for Mom, Jean Jones

ost-brain-injury life?

I enjoy talking to mom and going out and about with her.

15. What do you like least about brain injury?

I don’t like the tons of errands and feeling like the parent.

16. Has anything helped you to accept your survivor’s brain injury?

Caregiving came naturally because she’s my mother and I would never let her be alone.

17. Has your survivor’s injury affected your home life and relationships and, if so, how?

Yes. My mother’s brain injury has made home-life and relationships tough and stressful sometimes, as they don’t understand I HAVE to care for my mother – no one else will.

18. Has your social life been altered or changed and, if so, how?

Not really. I didn’t have a social life before my mother’s diagnosis.

19. What are your plans? What do you expect/hope to be doing ten years from now?

My future is nursing.

20. What advice would you offer other caregivers of brain-injury survivors? Do you have any other comments that you would like to add?

Have patience!!

 

(Disclaimer: The views or opinions in this post are solely that of the interviewee.)

If you would like to be a part of the SPEAK OUT! project, please go to TBI SPEAK OUT! Caregiver Interview Questionnaire for a copy of the questions and the release form.

(Clip Art compliments of Bing.)

As I say after each post: Please leave a comment by clicking the blue words “Leave a Commentanim0014-1_e0-1 below this post.

Feel free to follow my blog. Click on “Follow” on the upper right sidebar.

If you like my blog, share it with your friends. It’s easy! Click the “Share” buttons below.

If you don’t like my blog, “Share” it with your enemies. I don’t care!

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Brain Injury Resources . . . . . Brain Injury Journey Bulletin by Lash & Associates Publishing

Brain Injury Journey Bulletin by Lash & Associates Publishing

presented by

Donna O’Donnell Figurski

 

Lash & Associates

Lash and Associates Publishing/Training, Inc. introduces its newest brainchild. The Brain Injury Journey BULLETIN is a compilation of brain-injury resources on a variety of topics of interest to those who live in the world of brain injury. Caregiving, memory issues, and grief and loss are some of the interest areas presented in the bulletin.

Lash and Associates Publishing/Training, Inc. is the leading publisher of brain-injury-related books and resources. They are in the know!

The bulletin is published free of charge each month. You only need to sign up for your subscription. Follow this link to get your free subscription, and YOU can be in the know too. Brain Injury Journey BULLETIN

 

 

July 2017
Brain Injury Journey BULLETIN: GRIEF and LOSS

June 2017
Brain Injury Journey BULLETIN: Executive Functions Critical and Vital to Organization, Prioritizing, and Behaviors

May 2017
Brain Injury Journey BULLETIN: “Caregivers – The Visible/Invisible TBI Support Network”

April 2017
Brain Injury Journey BULLETIN: Memory

 

To locate additional books pertaining to brain injury, please check out Lash & Associates Publishing/Training Inc.

 

(Clip Art compliments of Bing.)

As I say after each post:

Feel free to leave a comment by clicking the blue words “Leave a Comment” below this post.

Please follow my blog. Click on “Follow Me Via eMail” on the right sidebar of your screen.anim0014-1_e0-1

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TBI Tales: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I Tripped & Stumbled, but Did Not Fall by Donna O’Donnell Figurski

I Tripped & Stumbled, but Did Not Fall

by

Donna O’Donnell Figurski

Donna O’Donnell Figurski

Recently, as I got out of my car, I stumbled on the curb. Somehow in the darkness, I did not see it. Though the event took less than a second, one thought ran through my head. It was not, “Oh, no! I am going to break a bone or scrape my knee.” It was not, “What a klutz! I’ll ruin my clothes.” And it was not about how embarrassed I would be. All of those possibilities probably would have been my first thoughts – before brain injury entered my life when my husband had a traumatic brain injury in 2005.

Now my mind is only a thought away from brain injury. So, as I tripped and stumbled, but did not fall, my mind raced to, “Please don’t let me hit my head.” I didn’t care how silly I looked or about my clothes being ripped or about getting any broken bones (they would heal). I worried about getting a brain injury. I worried about how a brain injury could change my life forever. I worried that if I were hurt, I could not sufficiently care for my husband, who needs my daily attention. Yes, those thoughts did race through my head in that fleeting second.

It only takes a second for a brain injury to occur. Most brain injuries occur because of an accident. Though we may be aware of the possibility of accidents, they cannot all be avoided. Fortunately, my accident was avoided – just barely. I can only hope that my potential accidents will be few and far apart in the future. I hope yours will be too.

As I say after each post: Please leave a comment by clicking the blue words “Leave a Commentanim0014-1_e0-1 below this post.

Feel free to follow my blog. Click on “Follow” on the upper right sidebar.

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