TBI – Survivors, Caregivers, Family, and Friends

Posts tagged ‘blogtalkradio.com/braininjuryradio’

TBI Tales . . . . . . . . Mission Possible!

Mission Possible!

by Jennifer Stokley

presented

by

Donna O’Donnell Figurski

 

jennifer-stokely-survivor-052615

I CAN’T BELIEVE I DID IT!

I don’t go out very often since my brain injury – usually only with my big sister or my “gal pal” for support. But, my neighbor had a mission planned. (I have become good friends with my neighbor, and I trust her. Also, we are similar in age.)

Baby Shower

My neighbor’s granddaughter is having a baby, and the baby shower is planned soon. I adore her granddaughter, but I know I just am not up to attending something with fifty people. Most of the guests will be strangers to me. So, that’s where our mission came in.

I told my neighbor that I would pay for all the food she would need for the party and also have her help me pick out healthy food stuff for the baby as my shower gift.

Well, we headed out and had an amazing time! We shopped at two stores I was unfamiliar with, but knowing how much I trusted my neighbor, I didn’t have any anxiety. I only had curiosity and fun running in me.

Grocery Store

I even helped her find two things she couldn’t find anywhere, and I reminded her about something she would need badly for what she is making! (She left her list at home! LOL)

I remembered all of my purchased things and carried them out of my neighbor’s car, but my neighbor noticed I forgot my favorite thing of all. I left my coffee mug in her car! As I was running out to yell to her, she thwas already at my porch and smiling, with my coffee mug in her hand!

Just two years ago, I would have never had the courage to go out with someone I only knew from talking to when she’s hanging out clothes. But today I did it! We also made plans for two more outings …

 

 

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(Photos compliments of contributor.)

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New NEWS: . . . . . . . . . . . . . Prisoners without Bars: A Caregiver’s Tale wins Award

New NEWS: Prisoners without Bars: A Caregiver’s Tale wins Award

presented by

Donna O’Donnell Figurski

BHBAwinner-sm

So proud to announce that my book, Prisoners without Bars: A Caregiver’s Tale, won the Beverly Hills Book Awards in the category of Caregiver.

You can click here to see all the other award winning books.

Beverly Hills Book Awards

 

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Survivors SPEAK OUT! Kuna Williams

Survivors SPEAK OUT! Kuna Williams

presented by

Donna O’Donnell Figurski

 

Kuna WIlliams1. What is your name? (last name optional)

Kuna Williams

2. Where do you live? (city and/or state and/or country) Email (optional)

I currently live in Tempe, Arizona. At the time of my accident, I was a homeowner in Surprise, Arizona.

3. On what date did you have your brain injury? At what age?

I received my traumatic brain injury (TBI) on July 27, 2006. I was 26 years old.

4. How did your brain injury occur?

I was involved in a motorcycle accident a couple blocks up the street from home. I was on my way to play a game of billiards.

5. When did you (or someone) first realize you had a problem?

When I was hit, a gentleman found my cell phone and called the phone number titled “Mom.” My mother and my father drove from Glendale to the scene of the accident – Surprise. I was taken to the hospital while in a coma. The following morning my mother was advised that, among other injuries, I had received a traumatic brain injury.

6. What kind of emergency treatment, if any, did you have?

I received emergency treatment and was ambulanced to the hospital. I was unresponsive at the scene of the accident, and therefore I was intubated. My left lung was collapsed (left pneumothorax) for which a chest tube was inserted. My left wrist was broken. (I had an open left distal radius and ulna fracture.) It was repaired with multiple screws. An EVD (external ventricular drain) was made for a closed head injury and remained for two weeks. I received a trache (tracheostomy tube) and was placed on a ventilator. (A tracheostomy tube is inserted into the trachea for the primary purpose of establishing and maintaining an airway.) A GJ-tube (gastro-jejunal tube) was also inserted. (GJ-tubes can be used to bypass the stomach and feed directly into the second portion of the small intestine.)webpage-clipart-hospital9-1

7. Were you in a coma? If so, how long?

I was in a medically induced coma for twelve days. About four months after my accident, they put in a ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt (which redirects excess fluid away from the brain to the abdomen, which can more easily tolerate surplus fluid). They also installed an inferior vena cava (IVC) filter (used to prevent blood clots from moving through the blood into the lungs), which will stay inside for the rest of my life.

8. Did you do rehab? What kind of rehab (i.e., inpatient or outpatient and occupational and/or physical and/or speech and/or other)? How long were you in rehab?

I had both inpatient and outpatient rehab. Inpatient rehab was for three months and included physical therapy, occupational therapy, and speech therapy. Holistic outpatient rehab included physical therapy, occupational therapy, cognitive therapy, and speech therapy. Holistic rehab was for a total of eighteen months. I continue to see a neuropsychologist.

9. What problems or disabilities, if any, resulted from your brain injury
(e.g., balance, perception, personality, etc.)?th

Due to my TBI, I have memory issues, changes in the speed of processing, a field cut (vision loss), and balance issues.

10. How has your life changed? Is it better? Is it worse?

Certain aspects of my life are better. I have more of an appreciation for what life has to offer, and I am more optimistic about what can be achieved. My feeling of optimism comes from my Faith, the many resources that are provided, and networking.

11. What do you miss the most from your pre-brain-injury life?

I miss cruising custom cars.

12. What do you enjoy most in your post-brain-injury life?

Kuna Williams and Evie

Survivor of Brain Injury – Kuna Williams & wife, Evie

I enjoy spending time with my wife, drawing, attending brain injury events, participating in church, and – best of all – being a caregiver and helping others who have physical and/or mental challenges.

13. What do you like least about your brain injury?

I don’t have much that I don’t like. It’s just sad how it took an accident to bring this new outlook on life.

14. Has anything helped you to accept your brain injury?

What helps me with acceptance is that I realize It can always be worse. I attend support-groups. Others with the similar conditions share with you their compensations, and you share your tips and tricks. You feel good about how you can help someone. I accept my challenge and realize I can use compensations. Acceptance is tough, but, once you have accepted your circumstance, think Oh well. Move on … things WILL get better!

15. Has your injury affected your home life and relationships and, if so, how?

Yes. What has changed is that I’m not out gallivanting and abusing substances. What has also changed is my financial life and spending tactics.

16. Has your social life been altered or changed and, if so, how?

See my answer to the previous question.

17. Who is your main caregiver? Do you understand what it takes to be a caregiver?

I am a survivor, but I also work as a caregiver. My main consumer has a TBI (just like me), and the other gentleman was born with challenges and wasn’t expected to live as long as he has. I treat them as friends that I can relate to. I don’t make their challenges a characteristic.

logo18. What are your plans? What do you expect/hope to be doing ten years from now?

I have previously done computer-aided drafting before and after my injury occurred. I also worked retail before I got back into drafting. After my TBI, I was no longer good at drafting. But, I am good at talking to people, and I love to draw. So, that is what led me to being a caregiver part-time and designing T-shirts part-time.

19. Are you able to provide a helpful hint that may have taken you a long time to learn, but which you wished you had known earlier? If so, please state what it is to potentially help other survivors with your specific kind of brain injury.

Kuna Willaims & Evie 2

Survivor of Brain Injury – Kuna Williams & wife, Evie

Survivor of Brain Injury – Kuna Williams & wife, Evie

I’ve learned from my rehab that “Things Take Time.” Don’t rush things, but keep trying. Show steady persistence until you develop a routine for something. Find something you are good at or something you want to do.

20.What advice would you offer to other brain-injury survivors? Do you have any other comments that you would like to add?

Find your Niche!

 

You can learn more about Kuna at the following sites.

SortaFixd

weremovingforward

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Caregivers SPEAK OUT! . . . . Carol . . . (for her husband, Andy)

Caregivers SPEAK OUT!

Carol (caregiver for her husband, Andy)

presented by

Donna O’Donnell Figurski

 

Carol1. What is your name? (last name optional)

Carol

2. Where do you live? (city and/or state and/or country) Email? (optional)

Toronto, Ontario, Canada

3. What is the brain-injury survivor’s relationship to you? How old was the survivor when he/she had the brain injury? What caused your survivor’s brain injury?

Andy is my spouse. He was 53. He was in a motorcycle accident on his way to work.th

4. On what date did you begin care for your brain-injury survivor? Were you the main caregiver? Are you now? How old were you when you began care?

I began care the day of the accident. I was in the hospital every day for eight to ten hours waiting for Andy to wake up. We finally came home after five months. I became his full-time caregiver, and I still am. I was 50; I just turned 52.

5. Were you caring for anyone else at that time (e.g., children, parents, etc.)?

No

6. Were you employed at the time of your survivor’s brain injury? If so, were you able to continue working?

Yes. I was working full-time, but I resigned after the accident.

7. Did you have any help? If so, what kind and for how long?

We were lucky to have a full team of therapists. But, we had no support-workers because Andy felt that the people were invading his privacy.

8. When did your support of the survivor begin (e.g., immediately – in the hospital; when the survivor returned home; etc.)?

Immediately. I was in the hospital every day to give my husband moral support and the healing effect of touch.

9. Was your survivor in a coma? If so, what did you do during that time?

My husband’s coma was induced. I was in the ICU (intensive care unit) with him all day. Holding his hands. Playing his music.e799afda1f4dee4bd0c8c6e0606325b1

10. Did your survivor have rehab? If so, what kind of rehab (i.e., inpatient and/or outpatient and occupational, physical, speech, and/or other)? How long was the rehab? Where were you when your survivor was getting therapy?

My husband was admitted to rehab for almost three months. It was exceptionally long. But, he was not in a position to benefit from all the therapies. He suffered from seizures, and the medication made him tired. He slept most of the days. I was at rehab with him all day. I tiptoed out for coffee breaks, but I didn’t go far.

11. What problems or disabilities of your brain-injury survivor required your care, if any?

I help with Andy’s problems with gait, balance, cognitive functions, memory, and emotional lability (involuntary, sometimes inappropriate, emotional displays of mood, which are overly rapid and exaggerated). I take care of meals, finances, housekeeping, and Andy’s soiled beddings. After continuing physio three times a week, Andy found that his gait and balance improved. The problem with his urinary tract got better on its own. I still accompany him to all his therapy sessions because of his memory problem.

12. How has your life changed since you became a caregiver? Is it better? Is it worse?

Life has become simpler. No running after unnecessary things. This gave me the chance to notice more, and I realized that there all lots of kind and helpful people around the community. Our roles changed – I have to deal with the house and finances.

13. What do you miss the most from pre-brain-injury life?hotel-clipart-transparent-background-4.png

We travel together two or three times a year. Andy was the one who used to plan and book the trips and accommodations. I miss him sharing his ideas about everything.

14. What do you enjoy most in post-brain-injury life?

Being with him. Seeing the progress every day. Listening to his fears and seeing him happy.

15. What do you like least about brain injury?

A lot of people are not aware of TBI (traumatic brain injury). I myself never heard of it until my husband was diagnosed as having a TBI. It has drastically changed his life. I have to deal with all the house work and repairs. I have to make the final decisions.

16. Has anything helped you to accept your survivor’s brain injury?

Yes. Andy used to tell me that there are no regrets in life. Everything is done through our own decisions. We cannot say “What if … ?”No Excuses

17. Has your survivor’s injury affected your home life and relationships and, if so, how?

Yes. My role is now changed. My two children and I miss Andy’s ideas, suggestions, and guidance.

18. Has your social life been altered or changed and, if so, how?

Yes. I have become overprotective. I don’t want to leave my husband alone. My friends are all working, so not only is there no time to meet, but it’s also not easy for me to leave the house without him.

volunteers19. What are your plans? What do you expect/hope to be doing ten years from now?

I would love to volunteer and help other people.

20. What advice would you offer other caregivers of brain-injury survivors? Do you have any other comments that you would like to add?

Be patient; time heals. It’s a learning process to both the survivor and the caregiver. And, it’s absolutely worthwhile! It changed my perspectives in life.

 

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SPEAK OUT! NewsBit . . . . . Blood Test Developed for Brain Injury

Blood Test Developed for Brain Injury

presented

by

Donna O’Donnell Figurski

 

th-1The Centers for Disease Control has reported that traumatic brain injury (TBI) accounts for more than 2.5 million visits to emergency rooms (ERs) in the US every year. Many people with a concussion do not even go to the ER because they have no symptoms and don’t believe that the ER can diagnose a brain injury if it’s not serious enough to be detected by a number of indirect tests. A CT (“cat”; computerized tomography) scan is usually ordered if a brain injury is suspected, but only 10% of CT scans detect a brain injury in people with a mild head injury.

thA quick, sensitive, and accurate blood test will soon be available for ERs EmergencyRoomto know if the brain has been injured. Some people will be negative. They will not need a CT scan and can go home with no worries. Others who are asymptomatic may actually discover that they’re positive for a brain injury. The ER doctor can then take appropriate action.

An objective blood test will be a game-changer for the treatment of TBIs. An obvious difference is that it will make many CT scans (and their radiation) unnecessary. On the other hand, people, especially those with a mild concussion, may discover they do have a brain injury and take appropriate steps. (Full story 1, 2)

 

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Sneak Peeks for Prisoners

My book, Prisoners without Bars: A Caregiver’s Tale, will be released to the public on November 1, 2018 by WriteLife Publishing of Boutique of Quality Books Publishing Company. Here are pre-order links for Barnes & Noble and Amazon.

Excerpt 4

Chapter 4

Unthinkable Odds

presented by

Donna O’Donnell Figurski

Crazed Woman

… I must have looked like a zombie. I stood mute, wringing my hands, breathing out and in and out again. I didn’t know what to do. I felt paralyzed. Brain SurgeonMy permission was needed to operate on my husband’s brain. How could I give it? How could I allow Dr. Hulda to ­work on my husband’s beautiful, smart brain? …

 

Please leave a comment/question. I will respond.

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Survivors SPEAK OUT! . . . . Cheri Marie Johnson

Survivors SPEAK OUT! Cheri Marie Johnson

presented by

Donna O’Donnell Figurski

 

Johnson, Cheri Marie Survivor 101717 2

1. What is your name? (last name optional)

Cheri Marie Johnson

2. Where do you live? (city and/or state and/or country) Email (optional)

Hayward, Wisconsin, USA

3. On what date did you have your brain injury? At what age?

September 11, 2016      I was 24.

4. How did your brain injury occur?

I fell down 27 stairs.

5. When did you (or someone) first realize you had a problem?

I was out with my dad. A person from the establishment saw me fall instead of going to the restroom. The doors to the men’s room and ladies’ room were right next to each other, but I was found at the bottom of the stairs – unconscious. So, I was life-flighted to North Memorial Hospital. It was the best TBI (traumatic brain injury) ICU (intensive care unit) near me.

6. What kind of emergency treatment, if any, did you have?

I was in an ambulance, put on a back board, given a neck brace, and brought to Spooner for a life-flight.air-rescue-clipart-14-1

7. Were you in a coma? If so, how long?

I was in a coma for three weeks in North Memorial and then put on the general floor. I was sent to Miller-Dwan in Duluth, Minnesota (of Essential Health-Duluth). I was in another coma for three weeks because I was still bleeding in my brain. It was swollen, so they couldn’t do surgery. They said I wouldn’t have lived.

8. Did you do rehab? What kind of rehab (i.e., inpatient or outpatient and occupational and/or physical and/or speech and/or other)? How long were you in rehab?

When I was sent to Miller-Dwan, it was for inpatient occupational, physical, and speech therapies. I was there for four days and then put into another coma after the coma I was in in the ICU. I had a tracheostomy, and, two weeks later, I was put on the general floor for three weeks. There I had occupational therapy, physical therapy, and speech therapy. Now I’m in speech therapy. I talk differently, and I have a hard time breathing from the intubation. I am also in occupational therapy. I have bad posture, and it’s hard to breathe that way.

9. What problems or disabilities, if any, resulted from your brain injury
(e.g., balance, perception, personality, etc.)?

I have bad balance. (I recently fell out of the shower.) I am being put on life-alert (helps contact emergency services). I have vertigo when I lie down. My personality has changed – I’m like a different person. I have anger that I can barely handle. At times, it feels like a Jekyll and Hyde disorder.Split Personality

10. How has your life changed? Is it better? Is it worse?

It’s worse. I am so angry all the time. I try to talk to who I am – it seems like I talk to an old friend of the person I used to be.

11. What do you miss the most from your pre-brain-injury life?

I miss singing and working for my kids.

12. What do you enjoy most in your post-brain-injury life?

I enjoy my kids and my dad. They make me so happy.

13. What do you like least about your brain injury?

I don’t like all the confusion. It’s even hard to put one foot in front of the other.

14. Has anything helped you to accept your brain injury?

I’m glad I’m alive and still have my kids.

15. Has your injury affected your home life and relationships and, if so, how?

I can’t work anymore. I’m exhausted. I need help with almost every daily task. I barely know how to take care of myself, but I still know how to take care of my kids. Relationships are a little harder because of my anger issue.

16. Has your social life been altered or changed and, if so, how?

People like to abuse people who they know they can. I have kicked people out of my life – they tried asking me for my medicine, and I will not do that.

17. Who is your main caregiver? Do you understand what it takes to be a caregiver?

NurseI have a social worker and a nurse team help me. I also have a nurse who comes over twice a week to plan my medicine box and write down my appointments. I just did a neuropsychological test, and they are saying I need a guardian.

18. What are your plans? What do you expect/hope to be doing ten years from now?

I’m hoping to feel like I am better, then okay. I hope they can find a way to fix my throat so I don’t have to live with a tracheostomy for the rest of my life. And I hope to find a way to not be so angry.

19. Are you able to provide a helpful hint that may have taken you a long time to learn, but which you wished you had known earlier? If so, please state what it is to potentially help other survivors with your specific kind of brain injury.

Find things that make you happy – your kids, animals, activities, etc. It will take you out of thinking about what happened.

20. What advice would you offer to other brain-injury survivors? Do you have any other comments that you would like to add?

I am here if you need to converse with a survivor. It’s nice to open up to someone with the same condition.

Please leave a comment/question. I will respond.

(Clip Art compliments of Bing.)

As I say after each post: Please leave a comment by clicking the blue words “Leave a Commentanim0014-1_e0-1 below this post.

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If you don’t like my blog, “Share” it (intact) with your enemies. I don’t care!

Feel free to “Like” my post.

 

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