TBI – Survivors, Caregivers, Family, and Friends

Posts tagged ‘Sandra Williams’

On The Air: Brain Injury Radio “Another Fork in the Road” . . . . . Grief After Brain Injury

On The Air: Brain Injury Radio “Another Fork in the Road”

Grief After Brain Injury

presented

by

Donna O’Donnell Figurski

 

images-1Grief is often an after effect of brain injury. It is experienced not only by the survivor, who may have lost his or her “old” self and is trying to adjust to his or her new world, but also by those who have frequent contact with the survivor. As we know, brain injury affects ALL members of the family, who are often the caregivers.

Lisabeth Mackall Book 061215

Lisabeth Mackall caregiver & author

Panelists, Sandra Williams (both survivor and caregiver), Dr. David Figurski (survivor), and Lisabeth Mackall (caregiver) joined me to discuss the topic of GRIEF. We examined the feelings of the family as they adjust to their loved one’s change, as well as discussed the stages of grief as outlined by Dr. Elisabeth Kübler-Ross in her book entitled, “On Death and Dying.”

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Sandra Williams survivor & caregiver

 

David

David Figurski survivor

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you missed this show about “Grief After Brain Injury” with Lisabeth Mackall (caregiver), Sandra Williams (survivor and caregiver), and David Figurski (survivor) on March 6th, 2016, don’t fret. You can listen to the archived show here. Click the link below.

See you “On the Air!”

On The Air: Brain Injury Radio “Another Fork in the Road” Grief After Brain Injury

(Clip Art compliments of Bing.)

(Photos compliments of guests.)

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On The Air: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Brain Injury Radio . . . . . . . . “Another Fork in the Road” with Survivor & Caregiver, Sandra WIlliams

On The Air: Brain Injury Radio “Another Fork in the Road” 

with

Guest: Survivor and Caregiver, Sandra Williams

presented

by

Donna O’Donnell Figurski

images-1Sandra William’s was thrust into the role of brain injury survivor and caregiver when her whole family was involved in a motor accident with a drunk driver with multiple DUIs. Sandra spoke about the trials her family endured and still endures because of the negligence of a stranger.

As two teachers, Sandra and I delved into how schools 12200687_895719387130278_18176772_ncan better help students who are identified with brain injury or special needs. Federally mandated, 504 Plans and Individual Education Plans (IEP) were discussed.

If you missed this show with Sandra Williams on “Another Fork in the Road” on November 15th, 2015 don’t fret. You can listen to the archived show here. Click the link below.

See you “On the Air!”

On The Air: Brain Injury Radio “Another Fork in the Road” with Survivor and Caregiver, Sandra Williams

(Clip Art compliments of Bing.)

As I say after each post: Please leave a comment by clicking the blue words “Leave a Commentanim0014-1_e0-1 below this post.

Feel free to follow my blog. Click on “Follow” on the upper right sidebar.

If you like my blog, share it with your friends. It’s easy! Click the “Share” buttons below.

If you don’t like my blog, “Share” it with your enemies. I don’t care!

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Survivors SPEAK OUT! Sandra Williams

Survivors SPEAK OUT! Sandra Williams

presented

by

Donna O’Donnell Figurski

12200687_895719387130278_18176772_n1. What is your name? (last name optional)

Sandra Williams

2. Where do you live? (city and/or state and/or country) Email (optional)

Athol, Idaho, USA

3. On what date did you have your brain injury? At what age?

My injury was on May 28th, 2012, at 10:00 am. I was 38.

4. How did your brain injury occur?

A drunk driver crossed the center lane as we were turning a corner in our Ford F250 Power Stroke. We were pulling a 26-foot travel trailer. There was a cliff on the other side of us. We should have gone over the cliff, but instead we crossed all lanes of traffic and ended up in a ditch. We should have jackknifed, but we didn’t. The truck that hit us also went through the length of our travel trailer. He ended up in the lane opposite to the one he was traveling in and facing in the opposite direction. We all should have died. The details of the accident are many. It sounds like a made-for-TV movie. We are all alive, but we’re not OK.

5. When did you (or someone) first realize you had a problem?

I first learned of my son’s brain injury when I took him to a neurologist. His primary care physician wanted a follow-up because my son was sleeping so much and his balance was off a bit. We made him rest all summer. When he went back to school, he went from an A-B student to one who got Ds and Fs. I was really focused on my son, but the neurologist diagnosed me too. The diagnosis shocked my primary care provider and me. I didn’t really believe her until I lost my job as a Special Education teacher.

6. What kind of emergency treatment, if any, did you have?

I lost consciousness. I was taken to the Emergency Room. I don’t remember babbling to the sky, but that is what my kids said. They told me this several weeks after the accident. They didn’t know I didn’t know. That’s when my husband knew something wasn’t right. But he thought I would get over it. We all rested that summer. I seemed to be doing well – no headaches, etc. – until I went back to work.

7. Were you in a coma? If so, how long?

No

8. Did you do rehab? What kind of rehab (i.e., inpatient or outpatient and occupational and/or physical and/or speech and/or other)? How long were you in rehab?

I have been to two ten-day sessions of speech therapy, vestibular therapy, cognitive behavioral therapy, and exposure therapy. I also attended Carrick Brain Injury Center, a multidisciplinary brain rehab center.

9. What problems or disabilities, if any, resulted from your brain injury
(e.g., balance, perception, personality, etc.)?

I am still struggling to work. My memory is still affected to the point of frustration for my family members. I struggle with headaches, dizziness, and confusion when people speak to me. I have given up being a youth group-leader. I tried to go back to work, but, due to the fact that educational systems do not accommodate, I cannot work as a teacher – not even online. I really want to run and work out like I used to, but I don’t. That is the biggest change. I never used to drink coffee or alcohol. I don’t abuse either, but now I drink both. I never used to eat chips or anything unhealthy, but I eat those things now. I used to garden, but now I don’t. I do want to return to the way it was with those things, but it is hard while I’m keeping up with my kids and their needs since the accident.

10. How has your life changed? Is it better? Is it worse?

I think my life is worse, but can get better. It is worse because I can’t work in a job where I can get full-time benefits. My health care needs have increased, and my income has decreased. I am trying to help my husband start a new business in construction. He is being patient with me, but it is not easy. Our kids are different, and we really struggled with their behavior until we went to Carrick Brain Injury Center. We still struggle with one kiddo, but I think it is a grief process that he is going through.

11. What do you miss the most from your pre-brain-injury life?

I miss running. (I ran a half marathon and was training for a full marathon when we were hit.) I miss having the energy to do anything I wanted. I miss remembering everything. I miss being able to find a job whenever I wanted. (I have been working since I was eight. I started working for my dad and got my first out-of-family job at the age of fourteen. I paid for the first four years of college by working, and I sent myself to Europe – some people in my church helped me to play basketball internationally.)

12. What do you enjoy most in your post-brain-injury life?

Nothing really. I wish I could say something different. But, my life is so limited from what it once was, and I look so normal. People expect me “to do better,” “to not give up,” or “to stop making excuses.”

13. What do you like least about your brain injury?

I dislike that I cannot be independent and that people expect more from me than I can do. If a person had a broken leg, that person would receive accommodations until it healed. Accommodations are not given when one has an invisible traumatic brain injury (TBI). It doesn’t work that way. But I will not give up.

14. Has anything helped you to accept your brain injury?

I was actually helped by the fact that I can’t work no matter how hard I try. Working came easily to me, just like sports. Now, working and sports are the hardest things for me to do. I will keep trying though. I can’t do them now, but that doesn’t mean I won’t be able to do them forever. I won’t give up. I will do them someday.

15. Has your injury affected your home life and relationships and, if so, how?

Yes, immensely. My kids get really frustrated with me, and so does my husband. I used to be unorganized and forget things, but now it is ten times worse. I really have to rely on notebooks and repeat myself several times. That is what is so frustrating for my family. They also don’t understand my need for rest or my light-sensitivity to the TV. There are many things to list, but I will keep it short!

16. Has your social life been altered or changed and, if so, how?

I don’t visit with anyone anymore. I used to go to bible studies, but they scare me now. (I am afraid I will say the wrong thing.) I can’t go see my mom because I can’t drive that long at one time (it takes two days for me to get there), and it’s just too long to be gone. Plus, I have a huge family, which is hard to be around. My sisters don’t understand my brain injury. I just stay away. It’s better for all of us.

17. Who is your main caregiver? Do you understand what it takes to be a caregiver?12202566_895719670463583_794991146_n

Me. I am my own caregiver. My husband tries, but he is focused on the business. I submit insurance claims and speak to the doctors. I am even filing claims with Disability Rights of Idaho, so I know I can be organized and I can do something!

18. What are your plans? What do you expect/hope to be doing ten years from now?

I plan to be working in construction until I put myself through college again to finish my counseling degree and/or get a certification in TBI so I can educate teachers about it. There is the need for special education to have a different evaluation process. I also plan to use online settings to sell lessons that target students with TBI in the secondary school classroom.

19. Are you able to provide a helpful hint that may have taken you a long time to learn, but which you wished you had known earlier? If so, please state what it is to potentially help other survivors with your specific kind of brain injury.

I wish I knew more about Disability Rights of Idaho and more about the complaint process for educators. (Parents are at such a loss!) The biggest tip I can give other survivors is not to listen to negative comments or to employers who tell you that you can’t do the job. Listen to your heart and your soul. Fight for yourself and others. It will keep you going.

20. What advice would you offer to other brain-injury survivors? Do you have any other comments that you would like to add?

Never, ever give up! If you can’t realize your dream one way, find another way to do it. It may take you longer, but do it. Henry Winkler (the Fonz) applied to sixty-eight different colleges before one accepted him. He was not diagnosed with dyslexia until his son was. He never gave up. We can’t either!

(Disclaimer: The views or opinions in this post are solely that of the interviewee.)

If you would like to be a part of the SPEAK OUT! project, please go to TBI Survivor Interview Questionnaire for a copy of the questions and the release form.

(Clip Art compliments of Bing.)

(Photos compliments of contributor.)

As I say after each post: Please leave a comment by clicking the blue words “Leave a Commentanim0014-1_e0-1 below this post.

Feel free to follow my blog. Click on “Follow” on the upper right sidebar.

If you like my blog, share it with your friends. It’s easy! Click the “Share” buttons below.

If you don’t like my blog, “Share” it with your enemies. I don’t care!

Feel free to “Like” my post.

SPEAK OUT! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Itty-Bitty GIANT Steps

SPEAK OUT! Itty-Bitty GIANT Steps

Itty-Bitty GIant Steps for Blog

SPEAK OUT! Itty-Bitty Giant Steps will provide a venue for brain-injury survivors and caregivers to shout out their accomplishments of the week.

If you have an Itty-Bitty Giant Step and you would like to share it, just send an email to me at donnaodonnellfigurski@gmail.com.

If you are on Facebook, you can simply send a Private Message to me. It need only be a sentence or two. I’ll gather the accomplishments and post them with your name on my blog approximately once a week. (If you do not want your last name to be posted, please tell me in your email or Private Message.)

I hope we have millions of Itty-Bitty Giant Steps.

 

Here are this week’s Itty-Bitty Giant Steps.

Scott M. Chapman (survivor)…I walked almost a mile without my walker or a cane.One Mile Sign th

Michele Dempsey (survivor)…Sometimes doctors tell you that you will never walk, talk, or do other things again. They told me that when I was first injured seven years ago. I think they don’t want to give anyone false hope or something. In my case, I believed what they said. I came home in a wheelchair, and I couldn’t speak well. They said that I wouldn’t walk or talk. Now I do both! Some days, I don’t do either well. If I am tired, it is worse, but I walk with a cane, and I can talk pretty well. When I was tested, I did poorly on everything four years in a row. They said I that I would not be able to handle my own money, have a checking account, or shop on my own. It took time, but I slowly got better at the things they said I couldn’t do.

I shop and pay my own bills, and I recently got a checking account! Checkbook2I was excited, but scared, to do it, but I finally did it. I wrote my first checks yesterday. This morning, my nurse went over everything, and I did it right! I know it is a small thing, but it feels good to be able to do this on my own. I guess what I am learning over all these years is that, if people – even doctors – and testing say you can’t, keep trying. Try again and again and don’t give up! I am proud of myself today over something that might be a little thing to others, and I like it.

Megan Erikson (survivor)…I found a support group! I had to put my pride aside and say, “I do need help and support.” 🙂

Sue R. Hannah (survivor)…I went back to physical therapy today. Not only did I have an awesome session, but I also learned a very valuable lesson. My most recent acupuncturists and my vision therapist assumed that they knew what was best for me. I believe their heart was in the right place, but not so much, their awareness. Emily, my physical therapist, recognized that I needed to work towards MY level of functioning – not anyone else’s. Giving me skills that I’ve never had is a pretty silly goal. I have been impaired since I was so young that I have adapted and developed lots of work-arounds. What the other practitioners didn’t realize is that I didn’t lose skills. I NEVER had them! I guess part of this occurred because I didn’t stress how early my trauma happened, and they assumed that I fit in a box, which I don’t. It’s hard for me to tell people how I got hurt because often they are traumatized by hearing my story. I’ve learned that I need to be careful about whose advice to take, regardless of what their training has been. Can anyone relate?

Michael Lee Savage (survivor)…My wife, Patty, “threw me under the bus” this morning by sayinTreadmill1-483-x-600g I would walk “cane-free” into my therapist’s office. Well, I’m never one to back down from a challenge, so I walked from the outside deck, over the threshold, and up and down the hallway in front of my physical therapist. He said, “Looks like we have a new starting point.” Back at home, I hit the treadmill for 35 minutes and then looped the downstairs hallway four times “cane-free.” For the first time in six years, I felt human again.

Susan Shacka (survivor)…My Itty-Bitty Giant Step is trying to be calmer.

Damian Sill (survivor)…I am a person who has overcome TBI. Almost eighteen years ago, I was nearly dead. Today I am fully alive. I am living a wonderful life. I have a great job as a nurse. I own my own home. I am in a beautiful relationship with a great future ahead of me. I look forward to life today. Initially, I was so confused. My life was difficult. But, I kept working away one day at a time, and today I reap the rewards. Thanks to all who helped me along my way.   – Feeling Blessed

if_you_need_someone_to_shovel_snow_flyer-r830f727a107247489fac6587395693ab_vgvyf_8byvr_324Laurinda A. Sousa (survivor)…I got my car out of a giant snowdrift in my parking lot. I did it all with my right arm because I have a frozen left shoulder right now.

Dana Wiedenmann (survivor)…I flew to San Diego at Christmas.

Sandra Williams (survivor)…I am able to maintain my job. Huge! Absolutely huge! I attended an early morning DAC (Disability Action Center) meeting, and I am helping my husband start a business. I am ditzy, but I will press on. I can’t find words; my ears ring; I am seeing double; and I cry a lot, but I will not stop. I will not be beaten!

YOU did it!

Congratulations to all contributors!

(Clip Art compliments of Bing.)

SPEAK OUT! Itty-Bitty GIANT Steps

SPEAK OUT! Itty-Bitty GIANT Steps

Itty-Bitty GIant Steps for Blog

 

SPEAK OUT! Itty-Bitty Giant Steps will provide a venue for brain-injury survivors and caregivers to shout out their accomplishments of the week.

If you have an Itty-Bitty Giant Step and you would like to share it, just send an email to me at donnaodonnellfigurski@gmail.com.

If you are on Facebook, you can simply send a Private Message to me. It need only be a sentence or two. I’ll gather the accomplishments and post them with your name on my blog approximately once a week. (If you do not want your last name to be posted, please tell me in your email or Private Message.)

I hope we have millions of Itty-Bitty Giant Steps.

 

Here are this week’s Itty-Bitty Giant Steps.

Jodi Jizmejian (survivor)…This morning, I used my right hand without thinking about using it. I’m right-handed naturally, but this act was not planned. It seemed like “natural.” Mind you, I’m still experiencing numbness and heaviness in my right hand/arm, but I realized that I automatically started using my right hand to do something that I’ve been using my left hand to do. Oh, the silly, little things that excite me.

Carmen Gaarder Kumm (survivor)…Be proud of me. I didn’t call anyone, nor did I check the Internet until afterwards. I was making a salad, and I didn’t have sour cream. So, I substituted cottage cheese for it!!! Then I checked the Internet. Yep, I did it exactly right! Yay, me!

Sandra Williams (survivor)…I just finished my second round of speech therapy. Now I have coping strategies to help me keep my job. This confidence has allowed me to control flashbacks as I work. I can’t control the fatigue, but I do feel I have a much better shot at working from home. I will never be hired to work outside the home, so it is so important for me to keep this job. I feel like I have some hope.

YOU did it!

Congratulations to all contributors!

(Clip Art compliments of Bing.)

SPEAK OUT! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Itty-Bitty GIANT Steps

SPEAK OUT! Itty-Bitty GIANT Steps

Itty-Bitty GIant Steps for Blog

 

 

SPEAK OUT! Itty-Bitty Giant Steps will provide a venue for brain-injury survivors and caregivers to shout out their accomplishments of the week.

If you have an Itty-Bitty Giant Step and you would like to share it, just send an email to me at donnaodonnellfigurski@gmail.com.

If you are on Facebook, you can simply send a Private Message to me. It need only be a sentence or two. I’ll gather the accomplishments and post them with your name on my blog approximately once a week. (If you do not want your last name to be posted, please tell me in your email or Private Message.)

I hope we have millions of Itty-Bitty Giant Steps.

 

Here are this week’s Itty-Bitty Giant Steps.

Beckie (caregiver) and Jerry…An Itty-Bitty Giant Step from a spouse’s viewpoint:

I’m learning to ease off. He is still a man. He can do and think for himself – just differently. And when I do NOT micromanage, we both are better. (P.S. TBI still sucks.)

Joyce Benavidez (survivor)…Today was the anniversary of my twin birth/death. Thanks to the wonderful support and encouragement I have on Facebook, I made it through my first year without a seizure.

Sara Catherine Birch (caregiver)…My husband managed several days last week without a daytime nap. Yesterday our daughter kept him from sleeping after a shopping trip, but he still managed to make it to bedtime without shouting at any of us. Very happy.

Joey Buchanan (survivor)…I’m getting the leaves out of the pool.

Joy Cameron (survivor)…I survived (LOL). It was a hell of a week, and I am still here, fighting and putting one foot in front of the other.

Natalie Elliott (survivor)…Here’s my Itty-Bitty Giant Step: I survived Thanksgiving with family. I put the tree up, but I had to put it together four times because following a sequence is taxing and very difficult.

Debbie Madison (survivor)…I survived Thanksgiving without killing my brother! And I had a great time!

Gena Marie (survivor)…I flew on an airplane for the first time and did OK. I never thought I would make it safely, but I did.

Joshua Puckett (survivor)…Despite being engulfed by a lot of the flooding feelings this week, I was able to maintain calm throughout. I never went St. Helens. So progress. That’s my Itty-Bitty Giant Step.

Kimberly June West (survivor)…I went on a trip and didn’t have a panic-attack!!

Sandra Williams (survivor/caregiver)…I had a successful IEP (Individualized Education Program) meeting. I fought back so many flashbacks and tears. When it was over, the staff said they couldn’t even tell if I was nervous. I still battle negative thoughts, but I ate two meals today – so huge for me since I wasn’t eating but a few times a week!

YOU did it!

Congratulations to all contributors!

(Clip Art compliments of Bing.)

 

SPEAK OUT! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Itty-Bitty GIANT Steps

SPEAK OUT! Itty-Bitty GIANT Steps

Itty-Bitty GIant Steps for Blog

 

 

SPEAK OUT! Itty-Bitty Giant Steps will provide a venue for brain-injury survivors and caregivers to shout out their accomplishments of the week.

If you have an Itty-Bitty Giant Step and you would like to share it, just send an email to me at donnaodonnellfigurski@gmail.com.

If you are on Facebook, you can simply send a Private Message to me. It need only be a sentence or two. I’ll gather the accomplishments and post them with your name on my blog approximately once a week. (If you do not want your last name to be posted, please tell me in your email or Private Message.)

I hope we have millions of Itty-Bitty Giant Steps.

 

Here are this week’s Itty-Bitty Giant Steps.

Bart Boughner (survivor)…For me, these past ten days were hard, but I held my head up and I did what is best for me and my kids. I allowed outside people to talk with my doctors. My kids are more than willing to help me with just my being honest. I showed them all my meds and explained every one of them. I stayed true to myself, and things turned out well! It’s never a good thing to hide things from people. I always stay an open book to anyone who wants or needs to know.

Bob Calvert (survivor)…I have had five surgeries since my last trip to Iraq and Afghanistan. I keep hoping that there won’t be any more surgeries. But, it looks like I have no choice for a hernia, and the first of two foot-surgeries did not go well. Next week, my doctor is asking Medicare to approve a wheelchair so I can get out of my apartment. Sometimes it gets to me, but what keeps me going is when I keep hearing story after story of what our military men and women and veterans have gone through as a result of their service to our country and what many of them go through every day. That keeps me sitting at this computer as long as I can every day and keeping our talk show (www.talkingwithheroes.com/about) and our mission going.

Michael Coss (survivor)…I am now starting to walk indoors without a cane – 9 years post injury. “Everything is possible when you believe.”

Penelope DeYoung (caregiver)…My husband had finished 13 days of HBOT (hyperbaric oxygen therapy), when, on Tuesday, October 28th, at 3:00 in the morning, I woke up to the bed’s shaking to find him having a grand mal seizure (the second one in five weeks and only the third in two and a half years). He was blessed in more ways than one. First, he had it in the night, so he was already lying down and on his side. I also kept my cool as I called 9-1-1. My husband has made a giant step forward because the doctor dropped a seizure medication that we now know was causing “brain fog.” He upped the dosage of another anti-seizure drug that was making my husband sick when it was started this past summer, but now his body has adjusted to it, and he is tolerating it very well. The higher dose of the “better” anti-seizure drug and the HBOT together have made Jim much more aware. He has shown initiation and motivation. We went to a spaghetti dinner in our hometown last night. People were awed by how much difference they noticed in his awareness. He knew many more people than I did. It was great to see so many people come up to him and say, “It is so good to see you.” Jim’s response to them was, “It is so good to be seen!” I love the progress he has made cognitively! Thanks for letting me share!

Jamie Fairies (survivor)…Hi, Donna. I saw your post on the wall of the group I created – Supporting ABI (Acquired Brain Injury). I thought that perhaps creating that group in 2007 to promote the awareness of brain injury and the Peer Mentor Support Program for those affected by brain injury would be considered an Itty-Bitty Giant Step. I am a survivor of multiple brain injuries.

Melanie Leatherman (survivor)…An Itty-Bitty Giant Step is something small that’s a big deal for us, right? I’m 4 years post. Every year, I’ve tried to go back to my old profession as a stylist, but it never worked out. Friday I tried again, and I could! Awesome feeling. I think it’s a big accomplishment for me. I can pretty much do everything now that I was told I couldn’t. I live alone with my 13-year-old and cook, wash her clothes, and make her lunches for school – things that most mothers don’t realize how big of a deal that is.

Barbara Zirilli-Lonergan (caregiver)…Today is day 40 for my dad. He’s still in the early stages of his recovery. He’s currently in a vegetative state, and he occasionally responds to commands. I am just thankful for today. Love to all of you.

John E. May (survivor)…I have an incredible giant step. I’m still breathing and unnaturally happy!

Grant Mealy (caregiver)…I’m reminded again not to be so hard on my partner, who has PML (progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy). He is not what he used to be, and he never will be again. He did not go through a bad illness to irritate me. I will forgive myself for yelling and move foreword. We are lucky to have each other.

Melinda Murphy (survivor)…One of my secrets that very few people knew was that I lost the ability to tie my shoes after my accident because I was unable to tie a bow. Well today, for the first time in over three and a half years, I did it. I have been crying for an hour. It’s the little things as well as the big that are so very important in that whole “independence thing.” God is so good to me.

Marti Lynch Owens (caregiver)…Gene’s Itty-Bitty Giant Step was last night (November 8th). (His accident was September 25th.) His trach has been removed. He said, “Home, Marti,” and I replied, “Not yet.” He asked, “Why?” and I tried to explain. He was angry, but I didn’t care – I was so happy to hear him speak. He always has emotions. After I left, the hospital called. He got himself out of bed. He was sitting on floor and pulled out his feeding tube, but he is fine – Thank God!

Shana Storms (survivor)…My Itty-Bitty Giant Step is that I went back to school. I got my BS degree. Now on to my MS.

Sunshine Struble (caregiver)…GIANT! January 6th will mark two years for my beautiful boy. He has not slept in his room since the incident – at first because his body was incapable of doing stairs, then because he was so fearful of being away from Mom and Dad. Tonight he is sleeping in his newly designed (in his way) room. I am so proud. It brings tears to my eyes.

Sandra Williams (survivor)…I can exercise without shaking. My shaking wasn’t from fatigue. When I began any form of a stretch and held, my legs would shake, even at the beginning. It’s not the same as shaking when your muscles are tired.

Sandra Williams (caregiver)…My son asked for his own 504 meeting and accommodations at work. (Section 504 is a federal law that protects students with disabilities from being discriminated against.) He said, “I need you to fight for me, Mom. The school isn’t listening.” It’s the first time he has admitted he needs help!

YOU did it!

Congratulations to all contributors!

(Clip Art compliments of Bing.)

 

 

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No memory of the day that changed my life

My name is Michelle Munt and this is my story about surviving a brain injury and what I continue to learn about it. This is for other survivors and their loved ones, but also to raise awareness of what can happen to those in an accident. This invisible injury too often goes undiagnosed and it can be difficult to find information about it. I will talk about things that have helped me as I continue to recover and invite others to see if it works for them too.

Everything and nothing. GM1123 😊

Bienvenue. I’m thinking this is the spot where I am to write a witty, flowery personal section that pulls you in......I got nuthin’

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