TBI – Survivors, Caregivers, Family, and Friends

Archive for April, 2016

SPEAK OUT! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Faces of Brain Injury Charles Ross

SPEAK OUT! Faces of Brain Injury Charles Ross  (survivor)

presented by

Donna O’Donnell Figurski

 Brain Injury is NOT Discriminating!

bigstock-cartoon-face-vector-people-25671746-e1348136261718It can happen to anyone, anytime, . . . and anywhere.

The Brain Trauma Foundation states that there are 5.3 million people in the United States living with some form of brain injury.

On “Faces of Brain Injury,” you will meet survivors living with brain injury. I hope that their stories will help you to understand the serious implications and complications of brain injury.

The stories on SPEAK OUT! Faces of Brain Injury are published with the permission of the survivor or designated caregiver.

If you would like your story to be published, please send a short account and two photos to me at neelyf@aol.com. I’d love to publish your story and raise awareness for Brain Injury.

 

Charles Ross (survivor)

Ross Jr., Charles Survivor 112415 copy

Charles Ross Jr. – Brain Injury Survivor

It has been just over thirty years since I had my traumatic brain injury (TBI) in November 1985. I remember nothing of the accident at all. What I say of the accident is what I learned after the fact. I had the paddles put on me before I got on the helicopter to fly to the larger hospital in St. Louis. The doctors even told my parents they were removing me from Intensive Care to make room for someone who might live. I was in a coma for fifty days. I spent over ten months in the hospital. I was in a wheelchair for one and a half years. And, I had seven summers of surgery to make it to where I can now walk with a cane.

I have severe memory problems. My short-term memory was, and still is, bad. I had been having what I called “spells,” during which I would get a feeling like a chill in my spine. My parents noticed the staring while I was in the hospital. The doctors took me off seizure medicine because they did not believe I was having seizures. I know those spells increased in frequency after that. I could go days with no spells, but other days, I could have hundreds. They usually seemed to last a few seconds, but Mom thought they sometimes lasted longer.

As the spells increased, the feelings I had changed too. I began to notice a feeling like I needed to have a bowel movement, but I never did that, I remember. I would get extremely hot, and sometimes the sweat would just pour out of me for a few seconds. Mainly at night, I would wake with a spell and have a horrible taste in my mouth. After I got my license back, I sometimes had these spells while I was driving. I could have them in class or while I was watching TV or walking or sleeping – it did not matter. I never noticed anything that triggered them. Four years after the accident, in my sleep on New Year’s Eve night 1989, I had a tonic-clonic (grand mal) seizure. It was determined that the “spells” were petit mal seizures. Treatments finally began for traumatically incurred epilepsy, which the doctor finally said I had.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

After I started on medication, the spells decreased dramatically. I would still have one, and my neurologist would increase my dose. That helped for some time, but the spells never stopped completely. Even though I had severe memory and physical problems along with the seizures, I managed to get two Associate Degrees over nine years. However, because of my memory problems, I failed to get my Bachelor’s Degree. I started working with my last degree, but the stress was too powerful to maintain the job. I had many jobs though, mainly contract jobs without benefits.

I began to have blank spells. Maybe I had them before, but I never remembered them or realized it. Why I knew I had them was because I was driving again and I would have an accident in which I hit someone in the back end. I would come out of any blank spell immediately, but I never remembered what had happened, other than that I hit someone. I figured that they hit the brakes quickly in rush-hour traffic and I could not stop.

Over the years, I would have an accident every year or two. Finally, I realized that, before each accident, I had that strange feeling also. So, then I knew what the real cause of the accidents was. After fifteen years of work, I lost my job. I moved in with my parents again. The new neurologist started me on a second medication, and that helped. It did not stop the spells though.

Ross, Charles Survivor

Charles Ross Jr. – Brain Injury Survivor

I moved again and got another neurologist. She put me on two more medicines. One was the same brand, just a different strength. That medicine with such a heavy dosage made me have mood swings sometimes. Altogether, it was over twenty-two years after treatment began and twenty-seven years after the accident before the right mixture was found and I felt in control again. I moved back in with my parents again in late 2014. I helped my parents the best I could with my three hospital stays and two operations. I drove my dad for cancer treatments before his death in September 2015. I am with my mom now. We help each other during the grieving process.

I hope my story serves as a source of strength, encouragement, and determination for others with TBIs to never give up. I was never supposed to live! If I did, they said I would be no more than a being in a chair, unable to do anything for myself.

Never Give UpI am writing my story, I drive, I went to college, I got two Associate degrees, and I worked for fifteen years. There is so much more, but anyone who reads this story should know that anything is possible. You may not accomplish as much as I did, or you may accomplish more. Just know that you should never give up on yourself. Feel proud of your body. If they had been in your shoes, they could never have done what you did, and that is to survive! Be proud!

 

(Clip Art compliments of Bing.)

(Photos compliments of contributor.)

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SPEAK OUT! Itty-Bitty GIANT Steps

SPEAK OUT! Itty-Bitty GIANT Steps

presented by

Donna O’Donnell Figurski

Itty-Bitty GIant Steps for BlogSPEAK OUT! Itty-Bitty Giant Steps will provide a venue for brain-injury survivors and caregivers to shout out their accomplishments of the week.

If you have an Itty-Bitty Giant Step and you would like to share it, just send an email to me at neelyf@aol.com.

If you are on Facebook, you can simply send a Private Message to me. It need only be a sentence or two. I’ll gather the accomplishments and post them with your name on my blog approximately once a week. (If you do not want your last name to be posted, please tell me in your email or Private Message.)

I hope we have millions of Itty-Bitty Giant Steps.

 

Here is this week’s Itty-Bitty GIANT Steps

Julie Attwell (survivor)…I’m in Oz (Australia). AustraliaI recently got out of hospital. I was in because of epilepsy from my acquired brain injury (ABI). My discharge was HUGE for me! I was finally put on the list for rehab for fine motor skills, speech,Hospital Bed walking, reading, and writing. I am able to start being me again. I’m super excited! My injury happened in February of 2015, and I have had no help. Now I am finally getting some. YAY!

 

David June 14 copy

David Figurski Brain Injury Survivor

 

David Figurski (survivor)…I’m ecstatic that I finally walked 1.5 miles on the treadmill! I did it at 2.5 mph.

treadmill-clipart-k10354422.jpg

YOU did it!

Congratulations to contributors!

 

As I say after each post:anim0014-1_e0-1

Please leave a comment by clicking the blue words “Leave a Comment” below this post.

Feel free to follow my blog. Click on “Follow” on the upper right sidebar.

If you like my blog, share it intact with your friends. It’s easy! Click the “Share” buttons below.

If you don’t like my blog, “Share” it intact with your enemies. I don’t care!

Feel free to “Like” my post.

 

(Clip Art compliments of Bing.)

(Photo compliments of contributor.)

Survivors SPEAK OUT! Evan Powers

Survivors SPEAK OUT! Evan Powers

presented

by

Donna O’Donnell Figurski

 

Powers, Evan Joseph Motorcycle

Evan Powers – Brain Injury Survivor

1. What is your name? (last name optional)

Evan Powers

2. Where do you live? (city and/or state and/or country) Email (optional)

Fort Mill, South Carolina, USA

3. On what date did you have your brain injury? At what age?

My brain injury happened on August 30th, 2014. I was 31.

4. How did your brain injury occur?

I was riding my Harley V-Rod Muscle with friends, and I was hit by an SUV. The driver, in a rush to buy smokes, turned illegally left and hit me. I died, was revived, fell into a coma, and “received” a traumatic brain injury (TBI) (diffuse axonal injury and brain stem damage). I had to relearn how to do everything! I’m doing very well, however – “What doesn’t kill you makes you stronger,” and I’ve proven to be a tough SOB. (LOL!)

5. When did you (or someone) first realize you had a problem?

At the scene of the accident

6. What kind of emergency treatment, if any, did you have?

A lot (LOL) – a craniotomy, arm surgery (compound fracture of my left arm), and intensive therapy (cognitive, vocational, physical, vocational, mental health, etc.). And I continued therapy (once a week and checkups).

Powers, Evan Joseph hospital

Evan Powers – Brain Injury Survivor

7. Were you in a coma? If so, how long?

Yes. I was in a coma a month.

8. Did you do rehab? What kind of rehab (i.e., inpatient or outpatient and occupational and/or physical and/or speech and/or other)? How long were you in rehab?

Yes. I did intensive inpatient therapy at Craig Hospital in Colorado (an incredible place!). Afterward, I continued with intensive rehab. Now I’m going only once a week.

9. What problems or disabilities, if any, resulted from your brain injury
(e.g., balance, perception, personality, etc.)?

I have balance issues, left-side weakness, and memory loss. I am prone to impulsivity and mood fluctuations.

10. How has your life changed? Is it better? Is it worse?

My life has changed in many ways – both negatively and, more importantly, positively! I suffer with balance issues, left-side weakness, memory issues, impulsivity, and emotional control issues. While those deficits suck (LOL), I’ve changed in so many ways for the better. I’m more positive. (I struggled with depression terribly before the accident.) I do not take life for granted, I am funnier and more fun-loving, and I am more passionate. Further, I’ve gained an understanding into the hell of having a TBI, and I have been moved to work with those who experience likewise – encouraging, sharing, and helping other survivors!

11. What do you miss the most from your pre-brain-injury life?

I miss some things – my job, my friends (lost a lot after the accident), having a sense of purpose, working, and – crazy as it may seem, considering what happened – riding my motorcycle (LOL). … But all in time!

12. What do you enjoy most in your post-brain-injury life?

I like how positive and passionate for life I am now. J

13. What do you like least about your brain injury?

I dislike not working and my left arm being weaker.

14. Has anything helped you to accept your brain injury?

Yes. I have been helped by friends, doctors, experience, time, and especially my mom!

15, Has your injury affected your home life and relationships and, if so, how?

Yes, very much so! I’m now divorced. (My ex and I had a rocky relationship before the accident.) Because of my problem with impulse control, I rush into relationships and “move too fast.”

16. Has your social life been altered or changed and, if so, how?

Yes. I lost a lot of friends after my accident. There were several reasons: my crazy behavior, being afraid of interacting with me, or just being “lousy friends” (LOL) – (for the best, I see now).

17. Who is your main caregiver? Do you understand what it takes to be a caregiver?

My mom is my main caregiver. She helps me out tremendously. I couldn’t have done what I did without her and my brother, Chris. Their love and support is much needed and is greatly appreciated!

18. What are your plans? What do you expect/hope to be doing ten years from now?

My future plans include going to school to get a degree in a field in which I can work with TBI survivors. I want to continue to heal, and I plan to start working part-time. I intend to better myself and help others, which has me excited!

Powers, Evan Joseph

Evan Powers – Brain Injury Survivor

19. Are you able to provide a helpful hint that may have taken you a long time to learn, but which you wished you had known earlier? If so, please state what it is to potentially help other survivors with your specific kind of brain injury.

Recovery from a TBI is brutal, but it gets better. Sometimes you run; other times, you crawl. Keep pushing and fighting – it’s worth it!

20. What advice would you offer to other brain-injury survivors? Do you have any other comments that you would like to add?

Be patient with yourself. Do the best you can – that’s all you can do. Keep fighting. I know that it’s hard, but it is worth the struggle! Also, reach out – get involved with other survivors. We understand each other more then others without injuries can. We’re family – rely on, encourage, and strengthen one another!

 

(Disclaimer: The views or opinions in this post are solely that of the interviewee.)

If you would like to be a part of the SPEAK OUT! project, please go to TBI Survivor Interview Questionnaire for a copy of the questions and the release form.

(Clip Art compliments of Bing.)

(Photos compliments of contributor.)

 

As I say after each post:

Feel free to leave a comment by clicking the blue words “Leave a Comment” below this post.

Please follow my blog. Click on “Follow Me Via eMail” on the right sidebar of your screen.anim0014-1_e0-1

If you like my blog, click the “Like” button under this post.

If you REALLY like my blog, share it intact with your friends. It’s easy! Click the “Share” buttons below.

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Brain Injury Resources . . . . . Tracy Chapman’s Song “New Beginning” Could Be an Anthem for Survivors

Tracy Chapman’s Song “New Beginning” Could Be an Anthem for Survivors

presented

by

Donna O’Donnell Figurski

 

Brain th-2The major challenge of brain-injury survivors is to eventually accept the “new” persons they have become. From the SPEAK OUT

Tracy Chapman

Tracy Chapman – Singer/Songwriter

Survivor Interviews on this blog, it is common to find that survivors achieve their highest quality-of-life when they finally accept their brain injury and all the limitations that have resulted. They essentially make new lives for themselves. The song “New Beginning” by Tracy Chapman was obviously written about the world, but the words could apply to survivors. (Audio, Lyrics)

 

As I say after each post:

Feel free to leave a comment by clicking the blue words “Leave a Comment” below this post.

Please follow my blog. Click on “Follow Me Via eMail” on the right sidebar of your screen.anim0014-1_e0-1

If you like my blog, click the “Like” button under this post.

If you REALLY like my blog, share it with your friends. It’s easy! Click the “Share” buttons below.

If you don’t like my blog, “Share” it with your enemies. That works for me too!

On The Air: . . . . . . . . . . . . . “Another Fork in the Road:” . . . . Julie Kintz on Clubhouses for the Brain-Injured

On The Air: Brain Injury Radio “Another Fork in the Road”

with

Julie Kintz, Brain Injury Survivor &

Working Group Director of the Brain Injury Education & Research Clubhouse in Indiana

presented

by

Donna O’Donnell Figurski

images-1Many folks who have had a brain injury are left with many residual effects. Therapies such as physical, occupational, and speech are

Julie Kintz Survivor Panel 070515

Julie Kintz – Brain Injury Survivor

offered in hospitals and rehab centers. Neuropsych is also offered, but the services for each of these therapies is limited. So what do folks do who still have needs? On this show, Julie Kintz, brain-injury survivor, focused on the needs of the brain-injured.

Julie spoke about the “Clubhouse” model, which provides a safe haven for those who live with mental illness after brain injury.

Julie is now working on developing her own “clubhouse, ” which will cater to folks who live with any sort of brain injury.

Zachary Stilwell, a member of the Carriage House Clubhouse in Fort Wayne, Indiana, stopped by to share his exuberant thoughts about his experiences with the clubhouse, too.

See you “On the Air!”

On The Air: “Another Fork in the Road:” Julie Kintz on Clubhouses for the Brain-Injured

(Clip Art compliments of Bing.)

As I say after each post: Please leave a comment by clicking the blue words “Leave a Commentanim0014-1_e0-1 below this post.

Feel free to follow my blog. Click on “Follow” on the upper right sidebar.

If you like my blog, share it intact with your friends. It’s easy! Click the “Share” buttons below.

If you don’t like my blog, “Share” it intact with your enemies. I don’t care!

Feel free to “Like” my post.

Survivors SPEAK OUT! . . . . . . . Raquel (Rocky) Gloden

Survivors SPEAK OUT! Raquel (Rocky) Gloden

presented

by

Donna O’Donnell Figurski

 

Gloden, Raquel (Rocky Survivor1. What is your name? (last name optional)

My name is Raquel Gloden. I go by Rocky.

2. Where do you live? (city and/or state and/or country) Email (optional)

I live in Arizona, east of Phoenix; my email is brainyliferocky@gmail.com.

3. On what date did you have your brain injury? At what age?

I had my last TBI (traumatic brain injury) in October 2013; I had concussions prior to this last one – it just happened to be the worst. I was 35 years old when it happened.

4. How did your brain injury occur?

I was enjoying an outing with my family. I stopped to take a picture of my children, and when I stepped back to get a better view, I slipped on some sort of substance on the marble floor. I bounced the back of my head on the floor a couple of times – and that was it.

5. When did you (or someone) first realize you had a problem?

I went by ambulance right away and had it checked. I was told that it was a concussion and to take some ibuprofen and that I should start feeling better. I followed the doctor’s recommendation, but it got worse instead of better. I ended up back in the hospital a week later for other issues associated with it. They advised me to go get it checked out further.

6. What kind of emergency treatment, if any, did you have?

Other than a CT (or “CAT”; computerized tomography) scan, I did not have any other emergency treatment.

7. Were you in a coma? If so, how long?

No. I am very fortunate not to have been in a coma.

8. Did you do rehab? What kind of rehab (i.e., inpatient or outpatient and occupational and/or physical and/or speech and/or other)?

I did outpatient vestibular and occupational rehab.

How long were you in rehab?

I did this for a couple of months.

9. What problems or disabilities, if any, resulted from your brain injury
(e.g., balance, perception, personality, etc.)?

Oh wow! This is a loaded question. I have balance problems. I have vision issues. (I see double now.) I was diagnosed with symptomatic ADD (attention deficit disorder). I now suffer from depression. My personality has definitely changed – some good, some not so good. I try to maintain a positive outlook towards everything, but it is often a challenge. Before my medication was regulated (and before it was determined that I needed medication), it was much more difficult to function (from what I can recall). Oh yes, I have memory problems now too.

10. How has your life changed? Is it better? Is it worse?

My life has changed. Is it better or worse? … I don’t know. I am no longer employed at the career I had for fifteen and a half years – that is scary. But, I get to be home with my children for now. I think it is all in the way I look at it. There are many things I will not be able to do anymore that I would have liked to. But, not many people are afforded the perspective and opportunity that I have either.

11. What do you miss the most from your pre-brain-injury life?

I miss the old me. I was very outgoing, loved to be around people, and was almost always happy. I could multitask better than many. I could solve problems and issues within seconds.

12. What do you enjoy most in your post-brain-injury life?

I was able to find out who my friends really are. I am able to help create the person I want to become. Most of all, I get to be with my children.

13. What do you like least about your brain injury?

I dislike the headaches, double vision, depression, ADD, and the lack of understanding. Those issues that are personal – I can find a way to deal with them. The lack of understanding is the worst. It feels as though I am not listened to sometimes and, even if I am, I feel like people just don’t understand.friendsfamily

14. Has anything helped you to accept your brain injury?

I have a great support-team that includes my family and dear friends. I go to counseling weekly, and my counselor is very counselorsupportive. I have been learning about being more mindful, which has also helped immensely. Recently, I have found that the TBI community is very supportive as well. Many times I think that I have not truly accepted my TBI, but I am getting there.

15. Has your injury affected your home life and relationships and, if so, how?

Yes, very much so. There are some relationships that do not exist anymore. This was mostly due to my ending the relationship. I had a new perspective after my TBI, and I do not feel I have time for people who will bring me down or whom I feel uncomfortable around. This was not usually the other person’s fault, but I am not the same as I was. I need my TBI to be accepted, or I do not need them in my life. My home life changed for sure. My children saw the incident, and I deal with that trauma every time we walk by a wet spot on the ground. My husband is a wonderful man and very supportive. I was the breadwinner though, and this has had to change. He is such a great man – he has not complained one bit. He supports me in all I do. I am fortunate to have my mom around me too, and she is a huge support; my dad was very supportive before he passed away in 2014. They all have encouraged me to continue creating myself.

16. Has your social life been altered or changed and, if so, how?

As I stated before, I am not as outgoing. If I can, I often avoid situations in which there will be loud noises or too many people. This means that I don’t go to as many parties or social gatherings, and when I do, I do not stay like I used to. I don’t think I have as many friends as I thought I did.

17. Who is your main caregiver? Do you understand what it takes to be a caregiver?

My main caregiver is my husband. He is at home with me. My mom helps a lot too, especially with the kids when my husband is at work. I believe a caregiver helps when times are tough, and he or she encourages positive thoughts and actions. To me, a caregiver assists when needed, but is not enabling. A caregiver encourages independence.Gloden, Raquel (Rocky) 2 Survivor

18. What are your plans? What do you expect/hope to be doing ten years from now?

My future plans … I would like to speak about TBI and help people to better understand. There are subjects that people do not talk about at all, and I would like to bring light to them and to help people understand that they are not alone. I would also like for others to understand the hardships that follow TBI survivors – even when other people cannot see them.

19. Are you able to provide a helpful hint that may have taken you a long time to learn, but which you wished you had known earlier? If so, please state what it is to potentially help other survivors with your specific kind of brain injury.

I wish that I would have known when I was younger how concussions would have impacted me long term. I remember pushing it when I previously had concussions. They were not treated the same as now either, and I wish I knew then what I know now. Take care of your brain – it is the only one you will ever have.

20. What advice would you offer to other brain-injury survivors? Do you have any other comments that you would like to add?

My advice is to stay strong, but still allow yourself to cry. It is hard, but as long as the hard times decrease and the positive times increase, you are on the right track. Also, you are not alone. I know people may see you and think that there is nothing wrong, and they may even think it is all made-up, but the people who know you – the people who truly matter – know. And you know. And that is all that matters.

 

(Disclaimer: The views or opinions in this post are solely that of the interviewee.)

If you would like to be a part of the SPEAK OUT! project, please go to TBI Survivor Interview Questionnaire for a copy of the questions and the release form.

(Clip Art compliments of Bing.)

(Photos compliments of contributor.)

 

As I say after each post:

Feel free to leave a comment by clicking the blue words “Leave a Comment” below this post.

Please follow my blog. Click on “Follow Me Via eMail” on the right sidebar of your screen.anim0014-1_e0-1

If you like my blog, click the “Like” button under this post.

If you REALLY like my blog, share it intact with your friends. It’s easy! Click the “Share” buttons below.

If you don’t like my blog, “Share” it intact with your enemies. That works for me too!

 

SPEAK OUT! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Faces of Brain Injury . . . . . . . . . . James Thomas (survivor)

SPEAK OUT! Faces of Brain Injury James Thomas  (survivor)

presented by

Donna O’Donnell Figurski

 Brain Injury is NOT Discriminating!

bigstock-cartoon-face-vector-people-25671746-e1348136261718It can happen to anyone, anytime, . . . and anywhere.

The Brain Trauma Foundation states that there are 5.3 million people in the United States living with some form of brain injury.

On “Faces of Brain Injury,” you will meet survivors living with brain injury. I hope that their stories will help you to understand the serious implications and complications of brain injury.

The stories on SPEAK OUT! Faces of Brain Injury are published with the permission of the survivor or designated caregiver.

If you would like your story to be published, please send a short account and two photos to me at neelyf@aol.com. I’d love to publish your story and raise awareness for Brain Injury.

Thomas, James survivor 111115James Thomas  (survivor)…I’m a traumatic-brain-injury (TBI) success story. I had three brain surgeries to remove three blood clots in my head. After the third surgery, I fell into a coma for three days. When I woke up, I lost the ability to walk and talk, and I wasn’t able to take care of myself. I had to learn every life-skill again, including how to write. I had to wear a diaper for seven months.

I was in the hospital for a month. When I was released, I went to one of best rehab centers in the state of New Jersey. There I had occupational, physical, and speech therapies twice a week. I was able to go home after three months, and my ex-girlfriend nursed me back to good health. I improved 150% in two years. I work now as a teacher assistant with Special Needs students.

 

(Clip Art compliments of Bing.)

(Photos compliments of contributor.)

As I say after each post: Please leave a comment by clicking the blue words “Leave a Commentanim0014-1_e0-1 below this post.

Feel free to follow my blog. Click on “Follow” on the upper right sidebar.

If you like my blog, share it intact with your friends. It’s easy! Click the “Share” buttons below.

If you don’t like my blog, “Share” it intact with your enemies. I don’t care!

Feel free to “Like” my post.

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