TBI – Survivors, Caregivers, Family, and Friends

Posts tagged ‘Juliet Madsen’

On The Air: Brain Injury Radio “Another Fork in the Road” “Depression and Suicidal Thoughts”

On The Air: Brain Injury Radio “Another Fork in the Road” 

with

Panelists: Survivor, Melissa Cronin and Survivor Troop, Juliet Madsen

Topic: Depression and Suicidal Thoughts

presented

by

Donna O’Donnell Figurski

Depression is a state of mind that can cause mental mood disorders. It is devastating and can affect every aspect of daily living. It can affect people in so many different ways and it is pure agony resulting from desperation and the need to escape. Depression is not an unfamiliar state for those who live with brain injury.

Juliet Madsen and Melissa Cronin, both survivors of brain injury, join me to discuss depression and suicide – two common, yet serious, repercussions of brain injury.

Melissa Cronin Head Shot 2When a car went rogue careening through 2 1/2 blocks of the Santa Monica, California Farmer’s Market it left Melissa Cronin with not only broken bones and a ruptured spleen, but also with a Traumatic Brain Injury. Melissa is the author of “Invisible Bruise” and “Silencing the Boom.” Both stories are published in “Chicken Soup for the Soul” books.

Juliet Madsen Uniform

Troop, Juliet Madsen, got her brain injury while serving her country in Iraq. Juliet is a member of the Board of Directors of R4 Alliance and is a master quilter. You can see some of her work at “Stroke of Luck Quilting.”

If you missed this show on “Another Fork in the Road” on October 4th, 2015, don’t fret. You can listen to the archived show here. Click the link below.

See you “On the Air!”

On The Air: Brain Injury Radio “Another Fork in the Road” Depression and Suicidal Thoughts with panelists, Survivor, Melissa Cronin and Survivor Troop, Juliet Madsen

Sources I used for this show:

  1. Everyday Health – 8 Unconventional Ways to Ease Depression

http://www.everydayhealth.com/depression-pictures/unconventional-ways-to-ease-depression.aspx

  1. Health – 7 Types of Therapy That Can Help Depression

http://www.health.com/health/gallery/0,,20310354,00.html

  1. Mayo Clinic – Psychotherapy

http://www.mayoclinic.org/tests-procedures/psychotherapy/basics/definition/prc-20013335

  1. Mental Health Foundation – Depression

http://www.mentalhealth.org.uk/help-information/mental-health-a-z/D/depression/

  1. The Guardian – Robin Williams, depression and the complex causes of suicide

http://www.theguardian.com/science/blog/2014/aug/18/robin-williams-depression-causes-suicide

  1. WebMD – Psychologist or Psychiatrist: Which Is Right for You?

http://www.webmd.com/mental-health/features/psychologist-or-psychiatrist-which-for-you

  1. WebMD – Symptoms of Depression

http://www.webmd.com/depression/guide/detecting-depression

Hotlines:

If you or someone you know needs immediate help, don’t waste time on the web, call 9-1-1 immediately.

There are many depression and suicide hotlines. Here are some I located. I am NOT endorsing them, but if you have concerns about depression or suicide, I might want to look into them in advance of any crisis.

 

  1. National Suicide Prevention Lifeline (1-800-273-8255) Suggested by the Mayo Clinic

http://www.suicidepreventionlifeline.org/

  1. Samaritans 24-Hour Crisis Hotline (212) 673-3000

http://samaritansnyc.org/24-hour-crisis-hotline/

  1. 24/7 Crisis Support 775-784-8090  

http://crisiscallcenter.org/crisisservices.html

  1. Most states have mental health hotlines. Here is a site that has links to most states.

Suicide Hotlines

http://www.suicide.org/suicide-hotlines.html

(Clip Art compliments of Bing.)

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On the Air . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Brain Injury Radio “Another Fork in the Road”  “Where Have All My Friends Gone?”

On The Air: Brain Injury Radio “Another Fork in the Road” 

with

Panelists: Caregiver, Lisabeth Mackall and Survivor Troop, Juliet Madsen

Topic: Where Have All My Friends Gone?

presented

by

Donna O’Donnell Figurski

Mackall, Lisabeth with Book

Lisabeth Mackall joined other caregivers when her husband and police officer, Frank, was in a serious car accident on the way to an emergency call. The accident left him with a brain injury.

Juliet Madsen Uniform

Troop, Juliet Madsen, got her brain injury while serving her country in Iraq. Juliet is a member of the Board of Directors of R4 Alliance and is a master quilter. You can see some of her work at “Stroke of Luck Quilting.”

Losing relationships, both family and friends, is a common result of brain injury and it is devastating to survivors and their caregivers, as well. Troop and survivor, Juliet Madsen, and Lisabeth Mackall, therapist and caregiver for her husband, join me to discuss the topic of “Where Have All My Friends Gone.” We’ll examine the reasons why some people just can’t stick it out and try to shed some light on how folks can keep their relationships alive with their brain-injured friends.

If you missed this show on “Another Fork in the Road” on September6th, 2015, don’t fret. You can listen to the archived show here. Click the link below.

See you “On the Air!”

On The Air: Brain Injury Radio “Another Fork in the Road” Where Did All My Friends Go? with panelists, Caregiver, Lisabeth Mackall and Survivor Troop, Juliet Madsen

(Clip Art compliments of Bing.)

As I say after each post: Please leave a comment by clicking the blue words “Leave a Commentanim0014-1_e0-1 below this post.

Feel free to follow my blog. Click on “Follow” on the upper right sidebar.

If you like my blog, share it with your friends. It’s easy! Click the “Share” buttons below.

If you don’t like my blog, “Share” it with your enemies. I don’t care!

Feel free to “Like” my post.

 

On The Air: Brain Injury Radio “Another Fork in the Road” . . . Panel Discussion – “All Disabilities Are Not Visible”

On The Air: Brain Injury Radio “Another Fork in the Road”

Panel Discussion – “All Disabilities Are Not Visible”

Panel Members – Catherine (Cat) Brubaker, Julie Kintz, and Juliet Madsen

with Host, Donna O’Donnell Figurski

presented

by

Donna O’Donnell Figurski

images-1Brain Injury survivors, Catherine (Cat) Brubaker, Julie Kintz, and Juliet Madsen discussed many issues that surround their lives as brain injury survivors who look “normal.”

Cat Brubaker Survivor Panel 070515Cat Brubaker is a two-time traumatic brain injury survivor and the founder of “Hope For Trauma.” Also, in the summer of 2014, Cat rode her recumbent trike Across America (diagonally) to raise awareness for brain injury.

Julie Kintz Survivor Panel 070515When Julie Kintz‘s car went off a cliff in California in 1991, she got a brain injury. Julie is a former Brain Injury Radio Network host.

Juliet Madsen UniformTroop, Juliet Madsen, got her brain injury while serving her country in Iraq. Juliet is a member of the Board of Directors of R4 Alliance and is a master quilter. You can see some of her work at “Stroke of Luck Quilting.”

If you missed this panel discussion about “invisible” brain injury on “Another Fork in the Road” on July 5th, you can listen to the archived show here. Click the link below to listen to Cat, Julie, Juliet, and me.

See you “On the Air!”

On The Air: Brain Injury Radio “Another Fork in the Road” Panel Discussion – “All Disabilities Are Not Visible”

Click here for a list of all “Another Fork in the Road” shows on the Brain Injury Radio Network.

“Another Fork in the Road” . . . Brain Injury Radio Network . . . Panel Discussion – “All Disabilities Are Not Visible”

YOU ARE INVITED!

Panel Discussion – “All Disabilities Are Not Visible”

Panel Members – Catherine (Cat) Brubaker, Julie Kintz, and Juliet Madsen

with host Donna O’Donnell Figurski

putthis_on_calendar_clip_art

Catherine (Cat) Brubaker, Julie Kintz, and Juliet Madsen join host Donna O’Donnell Figurski to discuss the many problems that surround their lives as brain injury survivors who look “normal.”

People easily understand the implications arising when someone suffers a broken limb or is diagnosed with cancer or is physically disabled. But, when someone is living with an “invisible” brain injury, folks find it difficult to comprehend. They don’t understand the seriousness of memory loss, confusion, lack of organizational skills, bursts of anger, or lack of emotions. “Get over it!” “That happens to me too,” and “Oh, I know what you mean….” are some of the phrases that are commonly heard by brain injury survivors, and they’re infuriating. Such a phrase is a big, red flag that shouts that the friend, family member, or loved one simply does not understand what his or her survivor is going through. Cat, Julie, and Juliet will address this topic. They hope to help others understand more clearly what it means to live with a brain injury while looking “normal.”

Cat Brubaker Survivor  Panel 070515Cat Brubaker is a two-time traumatic brain injury survivor and the founder of “Hope For Trauma.” Also, in the summer of 2014, Cat rode her recumbent trike Across America (diagonally) to raise awareness for brain injury.

Julie Kintz Survivor Panel 070515When Julie Kintz‘s car went off a cliff in California in 1991, she got a brain injury. Julie is a former Brain Injury Radio Network host.

Juliet Madsen UniformTroop, Juliet Madsen, got her brain injury while serving her country in Iraq. Juliet is a member of the Board of Directors of R4 Alliance and is a master quilter. You can see some of her work at “Stroke of Luck Quilting.”

Come One! Come ALL! 

What:        Panel Discussion Topic – “All Disabilities Are Not Visible”

Why:        Cat, Julie, and Juliet will discuss how “Invisible” brain injury affects their lives.

Where:     Brain Injury Radio Network

When:       Sunday, July 5th, 2015

Time:         5:30p PT (6:30p MT, 7:30p CT, and 8:30p ET) 80 minute show

How:         Click: Brain Injury Radio Network

Call In:    424-243-9540

Call In:     855-473-3711 toll free in USA

Call In:    202-559-7907 free outside USA

or SKYPE

If you miss the show, but would like to still hear the interview, you can access the archive on On Demand listening. The archived show will be available after the show both on the Brain Injury Radio Network site and on my blog in “On the Air.”

(Clip Art compliments of Bing.)

(Photos compliments of panelists.)

On The Air: Brain Injury Radio “Another Fork in the Road” with Juliet Madsen, TBI Survivor, US Troop, Quilter, Author

On The Air: Brain Injury Radio “Another Fork in the Road”

with

Juliet Madsen, TBI Survivor, US Troop, Quilter, Author

presented by

Donna O’Donnell Figurski

Juliet Madsen UniformJuliet Madsen has served in the US Army since she was 17-years old. She was involved in Operations Desert Storm and Desert Shield. While serving her country, Juliet suffered a Traumatic Brain Injury, at least one stroke, and numerous other medical issues, which changed her life #7 10610754_10203491518354714_4796635925244510505_nforever. On “Another Fork in the Road,” Juliet talked about how she copes with her new life and how she and her family make this new life work for them. I hope you won’t miss her show.

You can learn more about Juliet and read her book at Veterans Book Project. Scroll down the page to find Juliet’s book.

You can also see her collections of more than 50 quilts at Stroke of Luck Quilting.

Here are two of my favorites.

6Madsen092011

If you missed her interview on “Another Fork in the Road” on May 17th, you are in luck. You can listen to the archived show here.

Click the link below to listen to Juliet Madsen and me.

See you “On the Air!”

On the Air: Brain Injury Radio – Another Fork in the Road”

with Juliet Madsen – TBI Survivor, US Troop, Quilter, Author

Click here for a list of all “Another Fork in the Road” shows on the Brain Injury Radio Network.

“Another Fork in the Road” . . . Brain Injury Radio Network . . . Interview: Juliet Madsen

 You Are Invited

Juliet Madsen – US Troop, TBI Survivor, Quilter, and Author

putthis_on_calendar_clip_art

Juliet Madsen has served in the US Army since she was 17-years old. She was involved in Operations Desert Storm and Desert Shield. While serving her country, Juliet suffered a Traumatic Brain Injury and at least one stroke, which changed her life forever.

Come One! Come ALL! 

What:        Interview with Juliet Madsen, US Troop, TBI Survivor, Wife, Mother, Quilter, and Author

Why:        Juliet will share her story of living with brain injury and how she is helping the brain-injured community.

#3 1454864_10200875275550279_968652467_n

Where:     Brain Injury Radio Network

When:       Sunday, May  17th, 2015

Time:         5:00p PT (6:00p MT, 7:00p CT, and 8:00p ET) 90 minute show

How:         Click: Brain Injury Radio Network

Call In:    424-243-9540

Call In:     855-473-3711 toll free in USA

Call In:    202-559-7907 free outside USA

or SKYPE

If you miss the show, but would like to still hear the interview, you can access the archive on On Demand listening. The archived show will be available after the show both on the Brain Injury Radio Network site and on my blog in “On the Air.”

(Clip Art compliments of Bing.)

(Photo compliments of Juliet Madsen.)

Survivors SPEAK OUT! Juliet Madsen

Survivors  SPEAK OUT!  Juliet Madsen

presented by

Donna O’Donnell Figurski

#4 Juliet Madsen 21. What is your name? (last name optional)

Juliet Madsen

2. Where do you live? (city and/or state and/or country) Email (optional)

Parker, Colorado, USA     juliet@strokeofluckquilting.com

3. On what date did you have your brain injury? At what age?

I had three strokes (2004, 2009, and 2010), and I have a traumatic brain injury (TBI). I was 33 in 2004.

4. How did your brain injury occur?

My brain injuries are complex: heat strokes complicated by a traumatic brain injury in Iraq in 2004. I was being moved to a secondary location because of a heat injury, when there was a series of explosions on the highway. So, I have the illustrious honor of having both a brain injury as a result of heat injury and then a traumatic brain injury. This creates a problem for the doctors because I do not fall into any one category. I have very complicated neurological issues.

5. When did you (or someone) first realize you had a problem?

My family and the people I was stationed with in Iraq realized there was a problem. I was not making much sense when I wrote patient notes and when I wrote letters home. Then my speech was becoming garbled. I exhibited a halting speech pattern, in which I had trouble “spitting out” words. I also had tremors, which made even the simplest tasks difficult. #3 1454864_10200875275550279_968652467_n Manual dexterity issues, massive migraines, and balance problems caused my unit to put me on night shift and to adjust how and where I was living in Iraq. Then I was being transferred north where I could work in a more controlled environment when we were involved in a series of vehicle explosions. After that event, I was sitting with a few of the guys at the chow hall, and I said that “I didn’t feel well.” I suffered a seizure in the chow hall, and that started my slow trip home.

6. What kind of emergency treatment, if any, did you have?

I had emergency care to stabilize me in Iraq, then in a C-130 flying from Iraq to Kuwait, then again from Kuwait to Germany, and again to Walter Reed, and then to Ft. Bragg.  Although I know I had care to treat seizures and stroke, I only have very few bits and pieces of my memory from that time.

7. Were you in a coma? If so, how long?

No, I was not.

8. Did you do rehab? What kind of rehab (i.e., inpatient or outpatient and occupational and/or physical and/or speech and/or other)? How long were you in rehab?

I have had rehab both as an inpatient and as an outpatient. I am in and out of occupational, speech, physical, and recreational therapies even today. I have gone in and out of these therapies, as my TBI symptoms change over the years. I have often described my TBI as causing “rolling blackouts.” The polytrauma team that treats me has been really good about getting me in to see the appropriate team.

9. What problems or disabilities, if any, resulted from your brain injury
(e.g., balance, perception, personality, etc.)?

That is such a loaded question…. Initially I had left-sided weakness from the stroke, difficulty talking, balance issues, drop foot, short-term memory loss, major time perception problems, migraines all the time, and ringing in my ears. I was sound-sensitive. I have constant neck and head pain. I have hearing and vision changes (which the doctors tell me are a direct result of the TBI). I absolutely have personality changes. I was someone who always got along with people, worked as a paramedic, and did research. Now I have no concentration, I am angry with everyone, I am short with people, I cry easily, and I feel very defeated. Even with all of the incredible accomplishments in my life, I am disappointed in the perceived failures in my day-to-day life. I have had times since my brain injury when it is like I forgot who I was or what I have always stood for, and I hurt the ones who have always cared for me. I have major learning disabilities. I can’t do anything with numbers or time, and learning new information is extremely difficult – this from someone who graduated from college with honors. Concentration and accomplishing simple tasks are often very difficult.

10. How has your life changed? Is it better? Is it worse?

My life has changed 100%, but I can’t say that it is worse because I am still here. So, that is a good thing, but it is very different. I was a paramedic in the United States Army. I was always busy working, and now I am retired. I become tired and overwhelmed far too easily. I quilt for a living, and I make quilts for programs across the country. I am on the Board of Directors of a national non-profit organization that works with programs for the families of military and veteran personnel with TBI/PTSD (post-traumatic stress disorder). The organization provides other programs through recreational and activity-based services. This is a very different place from being a paramedic and saving lives.

11. What do you miss the most from your pre-brain-injury life?

I admit that I miss who I was before I was hurt. I miss being able to go to the store alone. I miss being able to be trusted with my own finances or being able to read a recipe and understand it the first time I read it. I had a very definite plan for my life, and my injuries changed all of those plans. I miss feeling like I really contribute to my family and to the world around me.

12. What do you enjoy most in your post-brain-injury life?

I try to enjoy simple things: butterflies, the pure joy of my dogs lying with me, my kids telling me that they love me, etc. I like learning new recipes, listening to music, or holding hands with my husband in case I can’t tomorrow. Basically, I try to enjoy this moment because I know that tomorrow isn’t promised.

13. What do you like least about your brain injury?

I would give anything to trust my memory and my body again. But, if I could have one wish, it would be to have my memory back. I have no memory of any of my kid’s proms, their birthdays, their graduations, etc. I wish I could just remember these events for their sakes.

14. Has anything helped you to accept your brain injury?

#8 Juliet & Peter MadsenMy family has helped me to accept my injuries because, although we joke around, they accept me for all that has happened. I was so angry and really emotionally crushed when I first came home. The only thing that I can always count on is my family, no matter what. The only other thing that has probably helped is time.

15. Has your injury affected your home life and relationships and, if so, how?

My husband, Peter, and I are so lucky to have each other. After twenty-three years together, I am thankful that this injury has not torn us apart, but it came very close. A TBI is exhausting for everyone involved, and I think that the first few years are spent in emergency mode – performing triage. Then as we started to get comfortable with how things were going, my brain “kicked us” – I suffered another stroke. We had a whole new series of issues and rules to learn. Peter and the kids have been incredible at supporting me. Although it has been a really rough road, we have been through it together. We are stronger because we are always together, and that part I am thankful for.

16. Has your social life been altered or changed and, if so, how?

Yes, I have actually lost friendships because of my TBI. I describe myself as a “golden retriever.” (I am excited to see you, but if you leave the room and come back in, I don’t know how long you were gone, but I am still really excited to see you.) It is because of this lack of the concept of time that I have lost friends. Also I wasn’t good enough at keeping in contact. I had a friend call me and tell me that I wasn’t an attentive enough friend. So now, I tell every potential friend this cautionary story. But to be honest, I don’t really try to make friends any more. Most people don’t understand me – or our family. Because of that, we are very private people. We don’t do a whole lot with others. It’s just easier that way. We would prefer to have lots of friends, but it just isn’t that easy.

17. Who is your main caregiver? Do you understand what it takes to be a caregiver?

My husband, Peter, is my main caregiver. I am so very thankful to him, in love with him, indebted to him, sorry, and every other adjective I can think of. I have moments of clarity when I see how terribly hard all of this is. It kills me that I have become a burden, and yet I am still his wife. I’d also like to say that I have had to watch my kids become my caregivers. They have taken care of me on too many occasions to count. It is incredibly hard on the entire family. They all suffer from PTSD as we go through this process. They all deserve so much more credit than they get for surviving this experience.

18. What are your plans? What do you expect/hope to be doing ten years from now?

I am ten years out from my injuries, but I am light years from my initial injuries. I hope to continue my physical improvements, and I would like to recover better in terms of my learning disabilities and mental health. I would like to go back to school and get a degree in Art Therapy to help other veterans and their families with TBI and PTSD. In ten years, I would really like to be working with military families through art in my own program. I would also like to have published my own quilting book.

19. Are you able to provide a helpful hint that may have taken you a long time to learn, but which you wished you had known earlier? If so, please state what it is to potentially help other survivors with your specific kind of brain injury.

There are so many setbacks during the recovery process. I never seem to be where I am supposed to be. But, I never stop because there are no set rules and no one is saying where you have to be. So, just keep going – never give up.

20. What advice would you offer to other brain-injury survivors? Do you have any other comments that you would like to add?

I think the worst thing I do to myself is to constantly beat myself up about what I could have or should have done to either prevent this or to change it now. It kills me to know where my family is and how my family has been changed forever because of all of the things that happened since 2004. I would give anything to change it, but I can’t. On good days, I can accept it and move past it, but on bad days, I can’t. It hangs over me and suffocates me. It is my wish that others out there like me hold on and cherish the life you have because no one can live it like you can.

Thank you, Juliet, for taking part in this interview. I hope that your experience will offer some hope, comfort, and #6 Juliet Madsen Snowinspiration to my readers.

(Disclaimer: The views or opinions in this post are solely that of the interviewee.)

If you would like to be a part of the SPEAK OUT! project, please go to TBI Survivor Interview Questionnaire for a copy of the questions and the release form.

(Photos compliments of Juliet.)

As I say after each post:

Please leave a comment by clicking the blue words “Leave a Comment” below this post.

Feel free to follow my blog. Click on “Follow” on the lower right corner of your screen.

If you like my blog, share it with your friends. It’s easy! Click the “Share” buttons below.

If you don’t like my blog, “Share” it with your enemies. I don’t care!

Feel free to “Like” my post.

 

On the Air: Brain Injury Radio Another Fork in the Road . . . . . . Bob Calvert, Jeannette Davidson-Mayer, and Juliet Madsen

On the Air: Brain Injury Radio

Another Fork in the Road

Helping Veterans & Troops Return From War

with

Bob Calvert, Jeannette Davidson-Mayer, and Juliet Madsen

images-1Meet my guests.

Bob Calvert, host of “Talking With Heroes” on Blogtalk Radio, will be my guest this evening. Bob has made numerous trips to Iraq and Afghanistan, where he talks with and brings hope to the troops serving in our military. As some of you know, TBI (traumatic brain injury) is the signature injury of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars.

Bob Calvert - Host of

Bob Calvert –
Host of “Talking with Heroes”

It is estimated that there are more than 11,000 troops who are affected with brain injury because of explosions from IEDs (improvised explosive devices), and many more troops experience concussions from the blasts. Often troops exhibit no obvious effects of brain injury until much later. So what happens to those troops while in the field? How can a commanding officer identify a troop who has a concussion? What happens to troops when they come home with these injuries? Those are a bunch of questions that I have. Bob and I will talk about how his show helps troops in the field and at home. We’ll also discuss the kinds of problems troops face when they return. Jeannette Davidson-Mayer, caregiver of her husband, a returned troop, and retired troop and brain injury survivor, Juliet Madsen will be joining Bob and me.

Jeannette Davidson-Mayer

Jeannette Davidson-Mayer Caregiver

Wife, mother, and caregiver, Jeannette Davidson-Mayer’s life took a new turn when her husband, DeWayne had his 5th accident in the service of the US Military. When in 2006, DeWayne was diagnosed with traumatic brain injury, post traumatic stress disorder, spinal injuries, as well as other medical problems, Jeannette stood up to help him. She became his advocate. Jeannette believes that both love and humor are vital to strengthening family relationships. I agree with her.

Juliet Madsen copy

Juliet Madsen TBI Survivor & USA Veteran

Juliet Madsen was a member of the United States Army for more than 17 years before she was retired from the Army due to medical conditions. Juliet is not only actively involved in her own recovery, but she is an advocate for other veterans. Juliet strongly believes in helping brain-injured troops and their families have a better quality of life and she tries to make a difference in the lives of those who were injured in the line of duty while serving our country.

Jeannette and Juliet both hold positions on the Board of Directors for R4Alliance. R4Alliance is an organization whose goal is to support military families through therapeutic and recreational activities. I love that concept. As a teacher of young children I believe that learning through play is key to success. So why wouldn’t fun through therapeutic and recreational activities also be a good way to approach healing with brain injury survivors? Sounds good to me.

Thank you, Bob, Jeannette, and Juliet, for sharing such wonderful information about what you each do to help veterans, troops, and their families cope with returning home from the wars with me and my listeners on “Another Fork in the Road” on the Brain Injury Radio Network.

Click the link below to listen to Bob, Jeannette, Juliet, and me.

See you “On the Air!”

Helping Veterans & Troops Return From War

Click here for a list of all “Another Fork in the Road” shows on the Brain Injury Radio Network.

“Another Fork in the Road” . . . Brain Injury Radio Network . . . Bob Calvert, Host of “Talking with Heroes”

YOU ARE INVITED!

putthis_on_calendar_clip_artDid you know that there are more than 11,000 troops who are affected with brain injury because of explosions from IEDs (improvised explosive devices), and many more troops experience concussions from blasts? We NEED to know more about brain injury and how we can avoid it.

Bob Calvert of “Talking With Heroes,” TBI caregiver, Jeannette Davidson-Mayer, and TBI survivor, Juliet Madsen join me on “Another Fork in the Road” to discuss the plight of brain-injured troops returning home from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

                                   Come One! Come ALL!

What:        Interview with Bob Calvert of “Talking With Heroes,” with TBI caregiver, Jeannette Davidson-Mayer, and TBI survivor, Juliet Madsen (Jeannette and Juliet of r4alliance)

Why:        Bob, Jeannette, Juliet, and I will discuss the difficulties troops face as they return home with brain injuries.

Where:     Brain Injury Radio Network

When:       Sunday, February 1st, 2015

Time:         5:00p PT (6:00p MT, 7:00p CT, and 8:00p ET) 90 minute show

How:         Click: Brain Injury Radio Network

Call In:    424-243-9540

Call In:     855-473-3711 toll free in USA

Call In:    202-559-7907 free outside US

or SKYPE

If you miss the show, but would like to still hear the interview, you can access the archive on On Demand listening. The archived show will be available after the show both on the Brain Injury Radio Network site and on my blog in “On the Air.”

(Clip Art compliments of Bing.)

(Photo compliments of Bob Calvert.)

Tag Cloud

Surviving Traumatic Brain Injury

TBI - Survivors, Caregivers, Family, and Friends

How Life Has Happened For Me

Grow Through What You Go Through

Claire Stibbe

Thriller Author and Blogger at Bookpreneur

Fatcowco

New Age Blogger

The Care Factor

Loving someone with a Traumatic Brain Injury

Brain Injury Blog With Free TBI Information

Brain Injury Blog and Helpful Articles

Montclair Write Group

Writing Support Group

Brain Injury Support Group of Duluth-Extension

Brain Injury Information and SUPPORT

Women Worldwide Network

Women around the world share their incredible stories

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A retrospective documentary of my most inner thoughts: A success in the making

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Memoir, personal growth, people-pleasing

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Learning how to survive with spouse's TBI

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Knit Neutrality

Knit (Verb) | 'nit : to join together

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