TBI – Survivors, Caregivers, Family, and Friends

Posts tagged ‘Stroke’

Survivors SPEAK OUT! Mark Moore

Survivors SPEAK OUT!  Mark Moore

presented by

Donna O’Donnell Figurski

moore-author-photo

Mark Moore – Bran Injury Survivor & Author

1. What is your name? (last name optional)

Mark Moore

2. Where do you live? (city and/or state and/or country) Email (optional)

McLean, Virginia, USA     mark@mbmoorefoundation.org

3. On what date did you have your brain injury? At what age?

2007   At age 46

4. How did your brain injury occur?

I had two strokes.

5. When did you (or someone) first realize you had a problem?

I was coaching my son’s baseball practice, and I began to lose my balance.

6. What kind of emergency treatment, if any, did you have?

I had a craniectomy (brain surgery in which a piece of the skull is removed, but, unlike a craniotomy, is not returned to its original location) to relieve the pressure on my brain.

7. Were you in a coma? If so, how long?

Yes. I was in a coma for four weeks.

8. Did you do rehab? What kind of rehab (i.e., inpatient or outpatient and occupational and/or physical and/or speech and/or other)? How long were you in rehab?

Yes. I had physical therapy, occupational therapy, and speech therapy as an inpatient for two weeks and then as an outpatient for two months.

8. What problems or disabilities, if any, resulted from your brain injury
(e.g., balance, perception, personality, etc.)?

Initially I had significant diminished use of my left side and loss of peripheral vision in my left eye. I couldn’t walk or speak.

10. How has your life changed? Is it better? Is it worse?

Having a stroke was the worst day AND the best day of my life. It was the worst day because it was scary and it was one of the first times I realized that I had no control over the outcome. It was scary for my wife and my family. When I found out that I had basically been “asleep” for nearly six weeks, I was scared all over again. I had to face the fact that I might not walk, talk, or think like Mark Moore ever again. In fact, I had to recognize that the “old” me might actually be gone. At that moment, it felt like the worst thing I could imagine.

Mark & Brenda Moore with Obamas.jpg

Mark & Brenda Moore with President & Mrs. Obama

As I struggled with those concerns though, I remembered my mother’s words – words I had forgotten, words she had spoken to me during her own health crisis. She said, “Mark, God will never give you more than you are able to handle.” Those words impacted me and turned me around. I was slowly able to stop thinking just of myself. I started thinking about God and what He could do and would do with my life now. He could pick up the pieces of this broken version of me and heal me – create in me the person he meant for me to be. That thought began to work in me, and though I knew it wouldn’t be easy, I also knew that, with God’s help, I could let go of the old Mark and become a new man.

11. What do you miss the most from your pre-brain-injury life?

Riding rollercoastersroller-coaster-thought-of-the-day-jewels-art-creation-clip-art

12. What do you enjoy most in your post-brain-injury life?

I enjoy my relationship to God.

13. What do you like least about your brain injury?

I dislike the constant scanning to drive

14. Has anything helped you to accept your brain injury?

Having a stroke meant I had to learn to surrender. I had to face the fact that my abilities as a “fix-it guy” were not going to come to the rescue. I had to do something that was hard for me to do. I had to be willing to give up my illusions of who Mark Moore was and hold on for dear life to who God is. That’s surrender! That’s where everything you thought you knew comes to a halt and God finally has enough of your attention to help you become what He planned all along.

When I first looked at what was going to be required of me in the recovery process, I did not want to do it. I thought it would simply be easier if God just shut me down, packed me up, and sent me back to His house. But, He didn’t do that! He kept me in the hospital for several weeks and then sent me back to my house. He showed me that recovery meant I had to totally trust Him and my wife, Brenda, and the therapists, who would bring me back to good health.

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Mark Moore – Brain Injury Survivor – 5K Race

Starting therapy looks daunting. It is daunting, and it’s even frightening! Everything in me resented that I had to be there and that I had to learn all over again things I’d known all my life. If you’re facing therapy and recovery now, all I can tell you is to do what you’re told to do. Make the effort. Try harder than you’ve ever tried in your life, and lean on the people who love you. Open your heart and mind to all that can still be possible for you. That’s what surrender requires. That’s what trusting God is all about. You’ll be in recovery for a long time (maybe the rest of your life), but you’ll be in good hands in the process.

15. Has your injury affected your home life and relationships and, if so, how?

One day (May 12, 2007), I had a stroke, which was followed by another one. I was fine one minute and fighting for my life the next. In the process of recovering from those strokes, I discovered something I had not fully realized before. God had a plan for my life. He had a purpose for me, and I was not on the path He preferred. In one day, my life changed, and my purpose changed with it. To be honest, when I discovered God wanted something more from me, I was relieved. Clearly, there was more I could do, and it didn’t always revolve around the work I had carved out for myself. I was relieved to know that I could step back from the life I designed and be far more comfortable in the one He designed.

basketball-clipart17My friends were amazed when I did not show any interest in simply going back to work. They thought it was strange that I did not want to play basketball, a game I had loved playing all my life. What I did want to do was to please God. What energized my spirit and resonated with my soul was to do the things God wanted – to fulfill His purposes in me.

What a difference a day makes! What joy it is to my heart that God was with me through the strokes and is with me now to guide me into being the Mark Moore He always knew I could be. What a joy it is to live more intentionally and more fully awake to the places He would have me go.

16. Has your social life been altered or changed and, if so, how?

Not really

17. Who is your main caregiver? Do you understand what it takes to be a caregiver?

I don’t have or need a caregiver.

18. What are your plans? What do you expect/hope to be doing ten years from now?

When God had my attention as I lay in a hospital bed, He asked me a new question. Whose job is it to help others? Whose job is it to make a difference? Whose job is it to spread the gospel? The answer was the same in every case. It was MY job! God had blessed my work and made it possible for me to bless others. He took me out of the race in which I’d driven laps for twenty years and said, “I have something new for you. I want you to slow down and hear what I have to say.” I stopped then and listened.

God didn’t “give me a stroke.” He used the stroke to give me a new purpose. He used the situation to help me hear His voice more clearly and to understand the job He had in mind. Whose job is it … to do good, to help others, to lend a hand? It’s mine, and it’s yours! Let’s use whatever resources we have been blessed with to help those around us. It will fulfill our life-purpose like nothing else can do.

19. Are you able to provide a helpful hint that may have taken you a long time to learn, but which you wished you had known earlier? If so, please state what it is to potentially help other survivors with your specific kind of brain injury.

It was interesting to me after my stroke experience to discover that I did not want to be “naked” in front of my family – in front of the people who knew me the best. Like Adam and Eve, I wanted to hide so they would not discover my fear and sense my weakness.

As I looked back at my initial reactions to my strokes, I realized we can’t hide from the people who know us well and love us any more than we can hide from God.

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Mark & Brenda Moore

My wife did not want me to hide from her. She was ready to help me – ready to stand beside me and offer me her strength. My friends were like that too. Caregivers and hospital personnel were set to help me, but I had to be willing to be “naked.” I had to be willing to let them see my weaknesses and my vulnerability. I was not the person I had been; I needed their strength.

Another thing that was extremely helpful during my stroke recovery was that I began to regularly put on my headphones to listen to gospel music. The effort to re-establish my fine-motor skills was sometimes grueling, and I wasn’t always sure I could do it. Gospel music comforted me and helped me get through the ordeal. It reminded me over and over again of what Jesus did to give me life, to lift me up, and to restore my soul. It also reminded me that there was nothing I was going through that Jesus did not experience. He paid the price so that I could be restored eternally, spiritually, and physically to this day.

20. What advice would you offer to other brain-injury survivors? Do you have any other comments that you would like to add?

One thing I tell everybody is that you can’t recover from a stroke or any debilitating illness without the help of your family, your friends, and your faith. It can take days, weeks, or months to see any real change in the things you are able to do physically. That means that mentally and emotionally you have to lean on the things that boost your morale and make a difference in your attitude. When it comes to the kind of help your family, friends, and faith can give in your recovery, it all depends on YOU!

I say it depends on you because you are the only one who can let others in to help make a difference. Your spouse can come to your aid every day and cheer you on and encourage you, but it won’t do any good unless you’re willing to receive it. I can admit that there were times when I didn’t really let my wife, Brenda, in. I was scared, and I didn’t want her to know it. I didn’t want to have to tell her that I didn’t think I could do what it took to recover. She had known me as a guy who was a go-getter – someone who rose to the occasion to get things done. After the stroke, though, I didn’t always believe that I had that same courage.

Friends stood beside me as well and helped me get the message that a lot of people cared and were rooting for me. They wanted me to get better and to become the old Mark again.

 

(Disclaimer: The views or opinions in this post are solely that of the interviewee.)

If you would like to be a part of the SPEAK OUT! project, please go to TBI SPEAK OUT! Survivors Interview Questionnaire for a copy of the questions and the release form.

(Clip Art compliments of Bing.)

As I say after each post: Please leave a comment by clicking the blue words “Leave a Commentanim0014-1_e0-1 below this post.

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TBI Tales . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Smiling is Contagious . . . . . . Smile, Harry, Smile!

Smiling is Contagious – Smile, Harry, Smile!

by

Donna O’Donnell Figurski

harry-jordan-in-gym

Harry Jordan – Brain Injury Survivor – in Gym

Recently I published Harry Jordan‘s “Itty-Bitty GIANT Step” and a great photo of a smiling Harry on my blog. Afterwards, we exchanged messages by Private Message on Facebook. I told him that I loved his smile. However, he told me that he rarely smiles and that his mother would be shocked to see this smiling photo of him.

Well, that was enough incentive for me to challenge Harry. I told him I would publish his smiling photos on my blog if he would send me five more. He did – including one of him AND his mom.

smile

 

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Harry Jordan – Brain Injury Survivor & his Mom

 

 

You can read our chat below.

Donna: I just love your smile.

Harry: I really don’t smile. My mom will be shocked.

Donna: Why will she be shocked?

Harry: ‘Cause I don’t smile.

Donna: Well, you SHOULD every minute. You smile with your eyes.

Harry: I don’t look at my pics – always mean – no real reason to smile.

Donna: Well, look at this pic, and maybe you can see a reason to smile.

Harry: I will try.

Donna: It made me smile, and it’s contagious. See how many people you can affect. Start with your mom.

Harry: If it can help ANYONE, I will smile.

harry-jordan-smiling

Harry Jordan – Brain Injury Survivor – Smile, Harry, Smile

Donna: Well, it helped ME!!!!! Pick your mom up and hug her and give her a BIG smile. Then let me know what she said.

Harry: And for that I will smile.

Donna: See … it’s working! Send me five NEW photos of you smiling, and I will publish them. Challenge is on.

Harry: Ha! Ha! Ha! Dang, now THAT is a challenge.

Did you know that smiling really is contagious? How many times have you walked down the street or through a store and someone, a stranger, smiled at you. What did you do? Chances are you smiled right back. It’s almost an automatic reaction. Did you know that smiling is healthy for you? It is! It releases neurotransmitters, like endorphins, serotonin, and dopamine. These hormones are produced in the brain and can help to relieve stress and lower blood pressure. Whoever thought that a smile could be your best medicine? Well, it’s certainly worth a try.

harry-jordan-and-friend

Harry Jordan – Brain Injury Survivor & Friend

So, as we so often hear, “Turn that frown upside down!” and see how much better you feel. Harry did! Just look at all the photos of his wonderful smile. He makes me smile, and I hope he does you, too.

harry-jordan-original-smile

Harry Jordan – Brain Injury Survivor

Harry Jordan - Brain Injury Survivor

Harry Jordan – Brain Injury Survivor

Harry Jordan - Brain Injury Survivor & Cousins

Harry Jordan – Brain Injury Survivor & Cousins

(Disclaimer: The views or opinions in this post are solely that of the author.)

If you have a story to share and would like to be a part of the SPEAK OUT! project, please submit your TBI Tale to me at neelyf@aol.com. I will publish as many stories as I can.

As I say after each post:

Please leave a comment by clicking the blue words “Leave a Comment” below this post.anim0014-1_e0-1

Please follow my blog. Click on “Follow” on the top right sidebar. (It’s nice to know there are readers out there.)

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If you don’t like my blog, “Share” it with your enemies. I don’t care!

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(Clip Art compliments of Bing.)

Survivors SPEAK OUT! Kenneth Powell

Survivors SPEAK OUT!    Kenneth Powell

presented by

Donna O’Donnell Figurski

 

 

Kenneth Powell - Brain Injury Survivor

Kenneth Powell – Brain Injury Survivor

1. What is your name? (last name optional)

Kenneth Powell

2. Where do you live? (city and/or state and/or country) Email (optional)

Saint Louis, Missouri, USA

3. On what date did you have your brain injury? At what age?

2010     I was 42 years of age.

4. How did your brain injury occur?

I’ve had three hemorrhagic strokes on the lower left side of my brain.

5. When did you (or someone) first realize you had a problem?

I fell out of bed after trying to stand up. My (then) girlfriend found me.

6. What kind of emergency treatment, if any, did you have?

The first stroke occurred on April 30, 2010. I knew my name, where I was, and what I was told had happened. Immediately after sleeping that night, the second stroke occurred. I was put into a coma for the next 30 days.

7. Were you in a coma? If so, how long?

Yes. 30 days

8. Did you do rehab? What kind of rehab (i.e., inpatient or outpatient and occupational and/or physical and/or speech and/or other)?

I had occupational, physical, and speech therapies as an inpatient and an outpatient.

9. How long were you in rehab?

One month

10. What problems or disabilities, if any, resulted from your brain injury
(e.g., balance, perception, personality, etc.)?

Aphasia, right-side paralysis, complete amnesia

Kenneth Powell - Brain Injury Survivor

Kenneth Powell – Brain Injury Survivor

11. How has your life changed? Is it better? Is it worse?

My life is challenging.

12. What do you miss the most from your pre-brain-injury life?

I miss running and normal kidney function.

13. What do you enjoy most in your post-brain-injury life?

I enjoy sharing my experience with others and proving mind over matter.

14. What do you like least about your brain injury?

I dislike people’s perceptions of “the disabled.”

15. Has anything helped you to accept your brain injury?

My faith has helped me accept my brain injury.

16. Has your injury affected your home life and relationships and, if so, how?

The perceptions about “disabled” or “handicapped” individuals have been a hindrance. Romantic relationships are nearly nonexistent.

17. Has your social life been altered or changed and, if so, how?

Perceptions about the disabled greatly affect my life.

18. Who is your main caregiver? Do you understand what it takes to be a caregiver?

I am my own main caregiver. I am helped occasionally by my sister.

Kenneth Powell - Brain Injury Survivor

Kenneth Powell – Brain Injury Survivor

19. What are your plans? What do you expect/hope to be doing ten years from now?

I hope to be back to work.

20. Are you able to provide a helpful hint that may have taken you a long time to learn, but which you wished you had known earlier? If so, please state what it is to potentially help other survivors with your specific kind of brain injury.

Ask as many questions as possible. Know and interact with as many survivors as you can (via websites, support-groups, etc.).

What advice would you offer to other brain-injury survivors? Do you have any other comments that you would like to add?

Personal and spiritual FAITH is essential to the day-to-day survival of this injury.

 

(Disclaimer: The views or opinions in this post are solely that of the interviewee.)

If you would like to be a part of the SPEAK OUT! project, please go to TBI SPEAK OUT! Caregiver Interview Questionnaire for a copy of the questions and the release form.

(Clip Art compliments of Bing.)

As I say after each post: Please leave a comment by clicking the blue words “Leave a Commentanim0014-1_e0-1 below this post.

Feel free to follow my blog. Click on “Follow” on the upper right sidebar.

If you like my blog, share it with your friends. It’s easy! Click the “Share” buttons below.

If you don’t like my blog, “Share” it with your enemies. I don’t care!

Feel free to “Like” my post.

 

SPEAK OUT! . . . . . . . . . . Itty-Bitty GIANT Steps

SPEAK OUT! Itty-Bitty GIANT Steps

presented by

Donna O’Donnell Figurski

Itty-Bitty GIant Steps for BlogSPEAK OUT! Itty-Bitty Giant Steps will provide a venue for brain-injury survivors and caregivers to shout out their accomplishments of the week.

If you have an Itty-Bitty Giant Step and you would like to share it, just send an email to me at neelyf@aol.com.

If you are on Facebook, you can simply send a Private Message to me. It need only be a sentence or two. I’ll gather the accomplishments and post them with your name on my blog approximately once a week. (If you do not want your lastname to be posted, please tell me in your email or Private Message.)

I hope we have millions of Itty-Bitty Giant Steps.

Here is this week’s Itty-Bitty GIANT Step

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Harry Jordan – Brain Injury Survivor

Harry Jordan (survivor) I’ve been blessed with many things in my life, but recently I was in tears. My left foot – on the side I had the stroke on – hasn’t moved since 2009 (pre stroke), but the other way-clipart-waycool2day, I was able to push down and move it! I know I’m being so emotional over something so small, but it’s HUGE TO ME! Maybe I am getting better. Maybe.

 
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simon-limbrick

Simon Limbrick – Brain Injury Survivor

 

 

Simon Limbrick (survivor) It’s been thirty-seven years since my TBI (traumatic brain injury), and I’m now learning that I should not have pulled out of my coma or made all the gains I did. I was determined to bring further improvement to my left eye, which sustained third nerve damage. I was told that I would eventually go blind in it and that I would definitely not be able to move it. In one of my annual eye checks, an optometrist remarked that he had never heard of someone with my condition having the eye improve year after year. In the last twelve months, there has been definite, noticeable vertical movement, as well.  My message to others? IT’S NEVER TOO LATE FOR HEALING!

YOU did it!

Congratulations to contributors!

(Clip Art compliments of Bing.)

(Photos compliments of contributors.)

As I say after each post:anim0014-1_e0-1

Please leave a comment by clicking the blue words “Leave a Comment” below this post.

Feel free to follow my blog. Click on “Follow” on the upper right sidebar.

If you like my blog, share it intact with your friends. It’s easy! Click the “Share” buttons below.

If you don’t like my blog, “Share” it intact with your enemies. I don’t care!

Feel free to “Like” my post.

 

Caregivers SPEAK OUT! ……. Ann Castro Baker

Caregivers  SPEAK OUT!  Ann Castro Baker

presented by

Donna O’Donnell Figurski

1. What is your name? (last name optional)

Ann Castro Baker

Ann Castro Baker - Mother and Caregiver for Son, Jesus Castro Hanson

Ann Castro Baker – Mother and Caregiver for Son, Jesus Castro Hanson

2. Where do you live? (city and/or state and/or country) 

Plainview, Texas, USA

Email? (optional)

sadeyez1969@yahoo.com

3. What is the brain-injury survivor’s relationship to you? How old was the survivor when he/she had the brain injury? What caused your survivor’s brain injury?

My TBI (traumatic brain injury)/stroke survivor is my 23-year-old son, Jesus Castro Hanson. Undiagnosed high blood pressure was the cause of this nightmare. His injury left him with severe brain damage and a limp, and his arm is still numb and just hangs. He spent 29 days in the ICU (intensive care unit). He was in a coma for almost two weeks … and he “died” three times.

4. On what date did you begin care for your brain-injury survivor? Were you the main caregiver? Are you now? How old were you when you began care?

I have been by Jesus’ side since the day it started, which was this past April 3rd. I am the main and only caregiver. I turned a year older in July, so now I am 47.

Jesus Castro Hanson - Brain Injury Survivor

Jesus Castro Hanson – Brain Injury Survivor

5. Were you caring for anyone else at that time (e.g., children, parents, etc.)?

I was helping my mother care for my 84-year-old father, who has dementia. I am no longer able to give her breaks. Now we both are exhausted.

6. Were you employed at the time of your survivor’s brain injury? If so, were you able to continue working?

(No answer)

7. Did you have any help? If so, what kind and for how long?

My son has a nurse who comes to see him about once or twice a month. But the nurse only checks vitals and asks questions.

8. When did your support of the survivor begin (e.g., immediately – in the hospital; when the survivor returned home; etc.)?

I have been by my son’s side since the day it began.

9. Was your survivor in a coma? If so, what did you do during that time?

My son was in a coma for two weeks. I had received my BA degree in ‘14, but I have had serious health issues of my own. My son was taking care of me until this happened.

10. Did your survivor have rehab? If so, what kind of rehab (i.e., inpatient and/or outpatient and occupational, physical, speech, and/or other)? How long was the rehab? Where were you when your survivor was getting therapy?

Jesus was a patient at a place known as Trustpoint Rehabilitation Center, and I got to stay with him. (When I stated I never left his side, I meant it!) There he received physical, occupational, and speech therapies. On the day we left, he took his first steps on his own. It was a proud and emotional moment for all.

11. What problems or disabilities of your brain-injury survivor required your care, if any?

Jesus needs help doing particular tasks, like holding things, opening things, and sometimes pouring things. He can dress, feed, and shower himself after relearning how to. His brain damage is severe – you can’t make instructions long and hard. Sometimes even if the instructions are short, he is still not able to do it. His short-term memory is non-existent, but surprisingly his long-term memory is on point.24-7-clockface-md

12. How has your life changed since you became a caregiver? Is it better? Is it worse?

I hate saying “for the worse,” but my life is at a standstill. I watch over my son 24/7, with no breaks. We had been quarantined to our home for two months because of his catching C. diff (the bacterium Clostridium difficile – one of the most important causes of infectious diarrhea in the U.S.) again. He is finally done with the Dificid (Fidaxomicin – an antibiotic), so we are now beginning to go for walks – nothing too far because he will get tired and will trip a lot.

13. What do you miss the most from pre-brain-injury life?

I miss leaving the house and not worrying about leaving Jesus alone. Now I have to make sure he is with me at all times. We can’t stay long because he either gets tired or annoyed from all the lights and noise. So I guess you could say I miss my freedom.

14. What do you enjoy most in post-brain-injury life?

I am relearning my son. I often say I lost my son in the ICU, and this young man is Jesus in the outer shell, but on the inside, he is a stranger … who I am beginning to know. Sometimes, my son wakes up, and he seems like he is six years old – and those days can be refreshing because of his sweet innocence. Other days, he will wake up as his 23-year-old self – some days are good, while others are just plain horrible because of his temper (which is new; he never really had a temper like this before).

15. What do you like least about brain injury?

ridkzo85tI mostly have a hard time with my Jesus’ temper. I do not like arguing with my son … but, then again, it is his frustration as well. It tears at my heart. This brain injury really altered my son’s life forever. It is tough on him and on me.

16. Has anything helped you to accept your survivor’s brain injury?

Yes – his scar. I know that may be a weird answer, but those days when he is either clueless or starts to yell at me, I look at his scar and automatically soften. I know he doesn’t mean it. He has been through so much for his age.

17. Has your survivor’s injury affected your home life and relationships and, if so, how?

I really do not have friends. I think some people are afraid to approach him because of his scar and his mentality now. Family members are good about it. But some people just sit back and stare. It has been different for all of us. I am still single. I recently started a long-distance relationship (very long distance, another county as a matter of fact) and it is going well. My son is happy to see the light back in my eyes.

18. Has your social life been altered or changed and, if so, how?

Social life? What is that exactly? I go nowhere. I only go out once a month to pay bills … and then back home to my son. I did mention we are starting to go on walks, so the fresh air is wonderful for both of us.

Jesus Castro Hanson - Brain Injury Survivor

Jesus Castro Hanson – Brain Injury Survivor

19. What are your plans? What do you expect/hope to be doing ten years from now?

I have faith that in ten years my son will be much better. I hope it will not happen again. I monitor his vitals three times a day. I make sure he eats right and exercises, gets plenty of sleep, and drinks enough water. I would hope that ten years from now my son will be able to be on his own. That is a long time … if he needs my help, I will be at his disposal. I gave him my word that I would not leave him until he was back to somewhat normal. He still has a long road ahead of him.

20. What advice would you offer other caregivers of brain-injury survivors? Do you have any other comments that you would like to add?

If there is a support-group in your town or close enough for you to go to, GO! I do not have that option, but I would love it if there were a support-group for the both of us here. If you must cry, cry in the shower … no one can tell! (Just say you got shampoo in your eyes.) Never lose your temper or let your survivor see you get that way. Even if you need to walk away for a minute or two to collect yourself, then do so and go back. Many people find God and pray – that seems to help them. SING! SING! SING! Music does wonders!

(Disclaimer: The views or opinions in this post are solely that of the interviewee.)

If you would like to be a part of the SPEAK OUT! project, please go to TBI SPEAK OUT! Caregiver Interview Questionnaire for a copy of the questions and the release form.

(Clip Art compliments of Bing.)

As I say after each post: Please leave a comment by clicking the blue words “Leave a Commentanim0014-1_e0-1 below this post.

Feel free to follow my blog. Click on “Follow” on the upper right sidebar.

If you like my blog, share it with your friends. It’s easy! Click the “Share” buttons below.

If you don’t like my blog, “Share” it with your enemies. I don’t care!

Feel free to “Like” my post.

 

On The Air: . . . . . . . . . . . . . “Another Fork in the Road:” . . . . Substitute Hosts, Lisa Dryer & Cam Compton – M.S. Meets Stroke

On The Air: “Another Fork in the Road:” with substitute hosts, Lisa Dryer & Cam Compton “M.S. Meets Stroke”

presented

by

Donna O’Donnell Figurski

 

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Brain Injury Radio Network (BIRN) hosts, Lisa Dryer of “Mess with M.S.” (Multiple Sclerosis) and Cam Compton of “Cam’s Corner” step up to the mic on “Another Fork in the Road” while I, (Donna O’Donnell Figurski) traveled to Michigan for my nephew’s wedding. Party Time!

Lisa and Cam discussed the similarities and differences of each of their brain injuries and how they approach life from slightly different angles. Both hosts emphasized how each brain injury is different and how each survivor responds to the difficulties presented to him or her.

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Lisa Dryer – Survivor – Host of “Mess with M.S.”

03 Cam Compton Photo for Banner copy

Cam Compton – Survivor – Host of “Cam’s Corner”

 

 

See you “On the Air!”

On The Air: “Another Fork in the Road:” with substitute hosts, Lisa Dryer & Cam Compton “M.S. Meets Stroke”

 

(Clip Art compliments of Bing.)

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SPEAK OUT! Guest Blogger … Randy Terry “How To Make Your Life Better”

How To Make Your Life Better

by

Randy Terry

presented by

Donna O’Donnell Figurski

Boy Blogger thSo many times I hear, “I want my life back!” I’ve said it myself and made myself miserable. Now six years post stroke, I see that I will never get my old life back. It’s impossible. But the trials of my stroke and my recovery have changed my life forever – and for the good.

I am a survivor, and the things I have learned about life will Randy Terry 2 102615not allow me to return to the old life. Sure, some of the things I loved to do are no longer possible, but I have adapted to change. It wasn’t easy, but I really had no choice.

For the first few years, I played the “pity game.” I was mad at the world. I lamented, “Why me?” One day, I found that I was tired of this game. I thought that there has to be a better life after stroke. I put the wheelchair in a corner and picked up my walker. I started the hard work. Soon I was on the cane doing the same thing. It is by no means easy. Not only was I walking, but I also felt proud. That’s why you hear me say, “Stand tall and proud!”

Do not waste your time in that “pity place.” It’s very lonely there, Randy Terryand there is nothing to gain but misery. The ability to change your life is not a secret hidden from you. Instead, it’s about working to get what you want out of life.

I’m not smarter than you. You just have to get that brain thinking right, and get up and get it done. It takes time to heal, but time is on your side. You have plenty of it. Don’t think it’s all got to come at once. Work slowly and steadily. It will come.

Thank you, Randy Terry.

Disclaimer:
Any views and opinions of the Guest Blogger are purely his/her own.

(Clip Art compliments of Bing.)

(Photos compliments of Randy Terry.)

As I say after each post: Please leave a comment by clicking the blue words “Leave a Commentanim0014-1_e0-1 below this post.

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No memory of the day that changed my life

My name is Michelle Munt and this is my story about surviving a brain injury and what I continue to learn about it. This is for other survivors and their loved ones, but also to raise awareness of what can happen to those in an accident. This invisible injury too often goes undiagnosed and it can be difficult to find information about it. I will talk about things that have helped me as I continue to recover and invite others to see if it works for them too.

Everything and nothing. GM1123 😊

Bienvenue. I’m thinking this is the spot where I am to write a witty, flowery personal section that pulls you in......I got nuthin’

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