TBI – Survivors, Caregivers, Family, and Friends

Posts tagged ‘AVM’

SPEAK OUT! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Faces of Brain Injury Melanie Goodman

SPEAK OUT! Faces of Brain Injury – Melanie Goodman

presented by

Donna O’Donnell Figurski

 Brain Injury is NOT Discriminating!

bigstock-cartoon-face-vector-people-25671746-e1348136261718

It can happen to anyone, anytime, . . . and anywhere.

The Brain Trauma Foundation states that there are 5.3 million people in the United States living with some form of brain injury.

On “Faces of Brain Injury,” you will meet survivors living with brain injury. I hope that their stories will help you to understand the serious implications and complications of brain injury.

The stories on SPEAK OUT! Faces of Brain Injury are published with the permission of the survivor or designated caregiver.

If you would like your story to be published, please send a short account and two photos to me at neelyf@aol.com. I’d love to publish your story and raise awareness for Brain Injury.

Melanie Goodman (survivor)

I had an AVM (arteriovenous malformation), a birth defect. No one knows he or she has one until it ruptures. Mine was about having weak veins where an artery was supposed to be. The weak veins were under constant high pressure. AVMThe AVM finally exploded at home one night. My love and best friend rushed me to the hospital, where they life-flighted me to Missoula, Montana. They said to let her die because she’s just going to be a vegetable for the rest of her life. My boyfriend fought them to get me to the best hospital on the West Coast, which was all the way in Seattle, Washington. Harborview Medical Center saved my life.

(Clip Art compliments of Bing.)

(Photos compliments of contributor.)

As I say after each post: Please leave a comment by clicking the blue words “Leave a Commentanim0014-1_e0-1 below this post.

Feel free to follow my blog. Click on “Follow” on the upper right sidebar.

If you like my blog, share it with your friends. It’s easy! Click the “Share” buttons below.

If you don’t like my blog, “Share” it with your enemies. I don’t care!

Feel free to “Like” my post.

Advertisements

SPEAK OUT! Faces of Brain Injury Tanner Thomas

SPEAK OUT! Faces of Brain Injury Tanner Thomas

presented by

Donna O’Donnell Figurski

Brain Injury is NOT Discriminating!

bigstock-cartoon-face-vector-people-25671746-e1348136261718It can happen to anyone, anytime, . . . and anywhere. The Brain Trauma Foundation states that there are 5.3 million people in the United States living with some form of brain injury. On “Faces of Brain Injury,” you will meet survivors living with brain injury. I hope that their stories will help you to understand the serious implications and complications of brain injury. The stories on SPEAK OUT! Faces of Brain Injury are published with the permission of the survivor or designated caregiver. If you would like your story to be published, please send a short account and two photos to me at neelyf@aol.com. I’d love to publish your story and raise awareness for Brain Injury – one view at a time.

Tanner Thomas (survivor) contributed by Molly Strieter Thomas‎ (mom and caregiver)

Thomas, Tanner Survivor 051015 Mom Molly Streiter ThomasMy six-year-old son, Tanner, had emergency brain surgery to deal with a ruptured cerebral AVM (arteriovenous malformation) on March 8th, spent two weeks in the PICU (pediatric intensive care unit) for his coma, was in Pediatric Care another one and a half weeks, Thomas, Tanner Survivor 051015 Molley Strieter Thomas Mom 11138613_10206751047637517_944490406653736580_nand had another two and a half weeks of inpatient rehab. It was a delight to go home! We are continuing with outpatient therapy. The doctors are amazed with his rehab. They are calling him a miracle. He has come so far – nothing is slowing this kid down. He remains so positive. He never says “no” or “I can’t.” Tanner really is an inspiration! He is AWESOME! ❤

Disclaimer: Any views and opinions of the Contributor are purely his/her own.

(Clip Art compliments of Bing.)

(Photos compliments of contributor.)

As I say after each post: Please leave a comment by clicking the blue words “Leave a Comment” below this post.

Feel free to follow my blog. Click on “Follow” on the upper right sidebar.

If you like my blog, share it with your friends. It’s easy! Click the “Share” buttons below.

If you don’t like my blog, “Share” it with your enemies. I don’t care! Feel free to “Like” my post

Survivors SPEAK OUT! Peter Corfield

Survivors  SPEAK OUT!  Peter Corfield

by

Donna O’Donnell Figurski

Peter Corfield - Brain Injury Survivor - 2010

Peter Corfield – Brain Injury Survivor – 2010

1. What is your name? (last name optional)

Peter Corfield

2. Where do you live? (city and/or state and/or country) Email (optional)

Marcilly En Bassigny, France      petercorfield3@gmail.com

3. When did you have your brain injury? At what age?

My brain injury happened on June 1, 2010. I was 55 years old.

4. How did your brain injury occur?

I had a stroke caused by bleeding of an AVM (arteriovenous malformation).

5. When did you (or someone) first realize you had a problem?

After returning from an art course, my wife found me on the floor.

6. What kind of emergency treatment, if any, did you have?

I was stabilized, and then I was helicoptered to Dijon Hospital. There they did a craniotomy and repaired the vein.

Peter Corfield - Brain Injury Survivor 2010

Peter Corfield – Brain Injury Survivor – 2010

7. Were you in a coma? If so, how long?

Yes. I was put into a coma for about two and a half weeks.

8. Did you do rehab? What kind of rehab (i.e., inpatient or outpatient and occupational and/or physical and/or speech and/or other)? How long were you in rehab?

I was sent to a rehab centre. There I had rehab for five and a half months.

9. What problems or disabilities, if any, resulted from your brain injury
(e.g., balance, perception, personality, etc.)?

I was hemiplegic (paralysis of one side of the body) with left-side paralysis, and I had an anxiety problem in the form of overactive bladder.

10. How has your life changed? Is it better? Is it worse?

My life has changed a great deal. In some ways, it is better; in others, much worse.

11. What do you miss the most from your pre-brain-injury life?

I miss being able to sleep in a normal bed with my wife. I also miss playing my guitar and driving.

12. What do you enjoy most in your post-brain-injury life?

I like being able to help others who have had the same experience.

13. What do you like least about your brain injury?

I dislike the lack of normality.

14. Has anything helped you to accept your brain injury?

My wife’s support has helped. Also my writing has been important.

15. Has your injury affected your home life and relationships and, if so, how?

It has. My wife and I sleep apart. But, my stroke has made me more thoughtful towards others. I think I am a better person.

16. Has your social life been altered or changed and, if so, how?

Yes. My anxiety affects our going out in the dark. The anxiety also makes it awkward to sit on chairs with no arms.

17. Who is your main caregiver? Do you understand what it takes to be a caregiver?

My wife is my caregiver. I fully understand how hard it is for her. It drives me on to recovery.

18. What are your future plans? What do you expect/hope to be doing ten years from now?

I am determined to be recovered enough to look after my wife and to be helping other stroke survivors

19. Are you able to provide a helpful hint that may have taken you a long time to learn, but which you wished you had known earlier? If so, please state what it is to potentially help other survivors with your specific kind of injury.

Keep a diary to realise just how much you have improved, as recovery is slow.

Corfield, Peter  Leg Push

Peter Corfield – Brain Injury Survivor – 2010

20. What advice would you offer to other survivors? Do you have any other comments that you would like to add?

I have written Kindle stroke-experience books. I donate all royalties to The ARNI (Action for Rehabilitation from Neurological Injury) Institute (http://www.arni.uk.com) to try to help other stroke-affected people.

 

Thank you, Peter, for taking part in this interview. I hope that your experience will offer some hope, comfort, and inspiration to my readers.

(Disclaimer: The views or opinions in this post are solely that of the interviewee.)

If you would like to be a part of the SPEAK OUT! project, please go to TBI Survivor Interview Questionnaire for a copy of the questions and the release form.

(Photos compliments of Peter.)

 

Survivors SPEAK OUT! . . . . . . . . Kevin Middleton

SPEAK OUT! – Kevin Middleton

by

Donna O’Donnell Figurski

Kevin with his granddaughter

Kevin with his granddaughter

 

1. What is your name? (last name optional)

Kevin Middleton

2. Where do you live? (city and/or state and/or country) Email (optional)

Courtenay, British Columbia, Canada     
5gemm9@gmail.com

3. When did you have your TBI? At what age?

Circa 1973

4. How did your TBI occur?

Birth defect

5. When did you (or someone) first realize you had a problem?

1977

6. What kind of emergency treatment, if any, did you have (e.g., surgery,

tracheotomy, G-peg)?

I had 7.5 hours of surgery to remove two blood clots and to clip off several aneurysms. An AVM (arteriovenous malformation) and a haematoma were removed December 05, 1977.

7. Were you in a coma? If so, how long?

No

8. Did you do rehab? What kind of rehab (i.e., In-patient or Out-patient and Occupational, Physical, Speech, Other)?
How long were you in rehab?

No. I was just sent home and told “No school for a year.”

9. What problems or disabilities, if any, resulted from your TBI (e.g., balance, perception, personality, etc.)?

Neuropsychological tests in 1978 and 1994 showed identical results. Short-term memory and recall in the 7 percentile mean that I am disabled. Anger issues ensued, born of frustration over continually forgetting.  Editing oneself is challenging.

10. How has your life changed? Is it better? Is it worse?

Since I was quite young, the loss of a photographic memory was a challenge. I withdrew from society. I have no close friends. I have many acquaintances, but I don’t like to socialize. The plus side is that my intellect increased from the removal of the blood clots. The downside is that by then I resented school. Learning took four times longer, and it was difficult to write an exam. My greatest joys are my five children and ten grandchildren.

11. What do you miss the most from your pre-TBI life?

My memory

12. What do you enjoy most in your post-TBI life?

Family

13. What do you like least about your TBI?

I dislike the fact people say they forget too. They don’t understand the frequency or the fact you lost your kids more than once or your wallet eight times.

14. Has anything helped you to accept your TBI?

Time helped. Being involved with a brain injury society has been beneficial. Even having friends who understand is helpful.

15. Has your injury affected your home life and relationships and, if so, how?

I experienced a divorce. I attribute partial blame to my not being rehabilitated professionally.

16. Has your social life been altered or changed and, if so, how?

Yes. Though I have been married 23 years, I like being by myself with my dogs. My wife socializes without me.

17. Who is your main caregiver? Do you understand what it takes to be a caregiver?

My wife is my main caregiver. It was she who said, “There’s something wrong here.” Due to her, I sought out help, which she supported.

18. What are your future plans? What do you expect/hope to be doing ten years from now?

I’m 54, so retirement is my goal. I’m so done with my brain injury. I like to help online those who are just beginning the healing journey.

19. Are you able to provide a helpful hint that may have taken you a long time to learn, but which you wished you had known earlier? If so, please state what it is to potentially help other TBI survivors with your specific kind of TBI.

It’s not your fault that you forget…it’s the fault of the brain injury. In other words, don’t take forgetting personally. I beat myself up for this all the time. However, why am I apologizing for something I have no control of?

20. What advice would you offer to other TBI survivors? Do you have any other comments that you would like to add?

Don’t get caught in the trap of chasing your past self. Before you know it, it’s 40 years later, and still your former self is bigger than life itself. My 18-year-old self had not fathered, had not grandfathered, had not held a job for 14 years, nor owned several businesses, yet he still was bigger than what I have accomplished. How ludicrous is that? Embrace who you are…a survivor…and move forward because that is where the future lies. Leave your past self in the rear view mirror where he/she belongs.

 

If you’d Like to learn more about Kevin Middleton, please visit his blog at My Broken Brain.

 

Kevin's brain.

Kevin’s brain.

Thank you, Kevin, for taking part in this interview. I hope that your experience will offer some hope, comfort, and inspiration to my readers.

(Disclaimer: The views or opinions in this post are solely that of the interviewee.)

(Photos compliments of Kevin.)

If you would like to be a part of this project, please go to TBI Survivor Interview Questionnaire for a copy of the questions and the release form.

Tag Cloud

Ten Thousand Days

The long and winding journey after loss

Wordcrafter9's Blog

Just another WordPress.com weblog

Tripambitions

It contains the world best places and things.

No memory of the day that changed my life

My name is Michelle Munt and this is my story about surviving a brain injury and what I continue to learn about it. This is for other survivors and their loved ones, but also to raise awareness of what can happen to those in an accident. This invisible injury too often goes undiagnosed and it can be difficult to find information about it. I will talk about things that have helped me as I continue to recover and invite others to see if it works for them too.

Everything and nothing. GM1123 😊

Bienvenue. I’m thinking this is the spot where I am to write a witty, flowery personal section that pulls you in......I got nuthin’

Teresa472002's Blog

Just another WordPress.com site

The Concussion Blog

An Education and Communication Outpost from an Athletic Trainer's Perspective

Howdy Hydrocephalus

Understanding my unique gyroscope

Recoveryofthemind.com

Head Injuries Change Everything

Sheri Lawrence de Grom

From the literary and legislative trenches.

With Grace ALWAYS

...doing my best to live a life of grace...

Mild to Moderate

TBI - Survivors, Caregivers, Family, and Friends

Hope for Trauma

TBI - Survivors, Caregivers, Family, and Friends

Lisabeth Mackall

Finding our way back

My Broken Brain

Putting the pieces back together again after encephalitis

The Visger Group

TBI - Survivors, Caregivers, Family, and Friends

melissacronin.com

TBI - Survivors, Caregivers, Family, and Friends

Inside Danielle's mind

Striving for serenity

%d bloggers like this: