TBI – Survivors, Caregivers, Family, and Friends

Archive for August, 2018

Caregivers SPEAK OUT! . . . . Carol . . . (for her husband, Andy)

Caregivers SPEAK OUT!

Carol (caregiver for her husband, Andy)

presented by

Donna O’Donnell Figurski

 

Carol1. What is your name? (last name optional)

Carol

2. Where do you live? (city and/or state and/or country) Email? (optional)

Toronto, Ontario, Canada

3. What is the brain-injury survivor’s relationship to you? How old was the survivor when he/she had the brain injury? What caused your survivor’s brain injury?

Andy is my spouse. He was 53. He was in a motorcycle accident on his way to work.th

4. On what date did you begin care for your brain-injury survivor? Were you the main caregiver? Are you now? How old were you when you began care?

I began care the day of the accident. I was in the hospital every day for eight to ten hours waiting for Andy to wake up. We finally came home after five months. I became his full-time caregiver, and I still am. I was 50; I just turned 52.

5. Were you caring for anyone else at that time (e.g., children, parents, etc.)?

No

6. Were you employed at the time of your survivor’s brain injury? If so, were you able to continue working?

Yes. I was working full-time, but I resigned after the accident.

7. Did you have any help? If so, what kind and for how long?

We were lucky to have a full team of therapists. But, we had no support-workers because Andy felt that the people were invading his privacy.

8. When did your support of the survivor begin (e.g., immediately – in the hospital; when the survivor returned home; etc.)?

Immediately. I was in the hospital every day to give my husband moral support and the healing effect of touch.

9. Was your survivor in a coma? If so, what did you do during that time?

My husband’s coma was induced. I was in the ICU (intensive care unit) with him all day. Holding his hands. Playing his music.e799afda1f4dee4bd0c8c6e0606325b1

10. Did your survivor have rehab? If so, what kind of rehab (i.e., inpatient and/or outpatient and occupational, physical, speech, and/or other)? How long was the rehab? Where were you when your survivor was getting therapy?

My husband was admitted to rehab for almost three months. It was exceptionally long. But, he was not in a position to benefit from all the therapies. He suffered from seizures, and the medication made him tired. He slept most of the days. I was at rehab with him all day. I tiptoed out for coffee breaks, but I didn’t go far.

11. What problems or disabilities of your brain-injury survivor required your care, if any?

I help with Andy’s problems with gait, balance, cognitive functions, memory, and emotional lability (involuntary, sometimes inappropriate, emotional displays of mood, which are overly rapid and exaggerated). I take care of meals, finances, housekeeping, and Andy’s soiled beddings. After continuing physio three times a week, Andy found that his gait and balance improved. The problem with his urinary tract got better on its own. I still accompany him to all his therapy sessions because of his memory problem.

12. How has your life changed since you became a caregiver? Is it better? Is it worse?

Life has become simpler. No running after unnecessary things. This gave me the chance to notice more, and I realized that there all lots of kind and helpful people around the community. Our roles changed – I have to deal with the house and finances.

13. What do you miss the most from pre-brain-injury life?hotel-clipart-transparent-background-4.png

We travel together two or three times a year. Andy was the one who used to plan and book the trips and accommodations. I miss him sharing his ideas about everything.

14. What do you enjoy most in post-brain-injury life?

Being with him. Seeing the progress every day. Listening to his fears and seeing him happy.

15. What do you like least about brain injury?

A lot of people are not aware of TBI (traumatic brain injury). I myself never heard of it until my husband was diagnosed as having a TBI. It has drastically changed his life. I have to deal with all the house work and repairs. I have to make the final decisions.

16. Has anything helped you to accept your survivor’s brain injury?

Yes. Andy used to tell me that there are no regrets in life. Everything is done through our own decisions. We cannot say “What if … ?”No Excuses

17. Has your survivor’s injury affected your home life and relationships and, if so, how?

Yes. My role is now changed. My two children and I miss Andy’s ideas, suggestions, and guidance.

18. Has your social life been altered or changed and, if so, how?

Yes. I have become overprotective. I don’t want to leave my husband alone. My friends are all working, so not only is there no time to meet, but it’s also not easy for me to leave the house without him.

volunteers19. What are your plans? What do you expect/hope to be doing ten years from now?

I would love to volunteer and help other people.

20. What advice would you offer other caregivers of brain-injury survivors? Do you have any other comments that you would like to add?

Be patient; time heals. It’s a learning process to both the survivor and the caregiver. And, it’s absolutely worthwhile! It changed my perspectives in life.

 

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SPEAK OUT! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Itty-Bitty GIANT Steps

SPEAK OUT! Itty-Bitty GIANT Steps

Itty-Bitty GIant Steps for Blog

 

 

SPEAK OUT! Itty-Bitty Giant Steps will provide a venue for brain-injury survivors and caregivers to shout out their accomplishments of the week.

If you have an Itty-Bitty Giant Step and you would like to share it, just send an email to me at donnaodonnellfigurski@gmail.com.

If you are on Facebook, you can simply send a Private Message to me. It need only be a sentence or two. I’ll gather the accomplishments and post them with your name on my blog approximately once a week. (If you do not want your last name to be posted, please tell me in your email or Private Message.)

I hope we have millions of Itty-Bitty Giant Steps.

Heather Sivori Floyd & TJ

Brain Injury Survivor, TJ and Mom, Heather Sivori Floyd

Heather Sivori Floyd (caregiver for her son, TJ) … TJ was finally able to get out of the bath on his own! We will always celebrate the little, yet big, milestones because they matter. It matters simply because these moments are the reasons to keep going when it’s very hard. (Keep it up, buddy! You’ll hit those goals because you are determined.) So very proud of him and his never-ending drive to keep going.

Heather Sivori Floyd

Heather Sivori Floyd – Caregiver for son, TJ

 

YOU did it!

Congrats to TJ!

 

(Clip Art compliments of Bing.)

(Photos compliments of contributor.)

As I say after each post:anim0014-1_e0-1

Please leave a comment by clicking the blue words “Leave a Comment” below this post.

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Survivors SPEAK OUT! . . . Gage Mabry

Survivors SPEAK OUT! Gage Mabry

presented by

Donna O’Donnell Figurski

 

Gage Mabry 1

Gage Mabry – survivor of brain injury

1. What is your name? (last name optional)

Gage Mabry

2. Where do you live? (city and/or state and/or country) Email (optional)

Missouri, USA

3. On what date did you have your brain injury? At what age?

October 24, 2015  I was 20 years old.

4. How did your brain injury occur?

I was working, and a fifteen-pound scanner fell from a twelve-foot ladder overhead. It landed on top of my head.

5. When did you (or someone) first realize you had a problem?

Immediately. I knew that I took a good hit to the head. It was like being a cartoon character in a slow-moving cartoon.

6. What kind of emergency treatment, if any, did you have?

There was no emergency-care immediately after the accident. I continued to work the rest of my shift. I was disoriented, my vision was blurry, and I developed a massive headache. It wasn’t until my mom tried to wake me up that we realized there was a problem.1304_Symptom_12

7. Were you in a coma? If so, how long?

No

8. Did you do rehab? What kind of rehab (i.e., inpatient or outpatient and occupational and/or physical and/or speech and/or other)? How long were you in rehab?

I was sent to a company doctor, who at first diagnosed my injury as a concussion. When my symptoms continued to persist and worsen over the next few weeks, the company sent me to have a CT (“cat”; computerized tomography) scan, which showed no abnormalities. Over the next three months of “rest,” my symptoms continued, and new ones developed. So now, my brain injury was diagnosed as Post-Concussion Syndrome. I was sent for neurological testing, which showed deficiencies in brain function. I was then referred for further treatments to involve pain management, balance therapy, and counseling. But, due to the situation, I never received any treatment other than what my family could try and provide. Now after two years and an independent medical exam, I’ve been diagnosed as having “Diffuse TBI” (traumatic brain injury).

9. What problems or disabilities, if any, resulted from your brain injury
(e.g., balance, perception, personality, etc.)?

headacheI have severe migraines that last for days, photophobia, sensitivities to loud sounds and to certain smells, and balance issues. I also have issues with depression, anxiety, anger, and fatigue that are so bad that I can’t even function some days.

10. How has your life changed? Is it better? Is it worse?

This is a hard one. My old life is gone, but my new one is filled with good and bad … it’s a work in progress!

11. What do you miss the most from your pre-brain-injury life?

Activities I used to do; my friends.

12. What do you enjoy most in your post-brain-injury life?

All the possibilities

Gage Mabry 2

Gage Mabry – Brain Injury Survivor

13. What do you like least about your brain injury?

The headaches

14. Has anything helped you to accept your brain injury?

My mom!

15. Has your injury affected your home life and relationships and, if so, how?

This has been a roller-coaster ride. It has devastated my family financially, but it has brought us together – with more love and support for each other that we had before. My friends and girlfriend have their lives to live, and I just wasn’t part of their plans anymore.

16. Has your social life been altered or changed and, if so, how?

This difference has been the hardest for me to accept. I went from being a popular, outgoing, and athletic person to a withdrawn, angry, and depressed person overnight. Social anxiety has been the hardest things to try and overcome, but I’m doing it day by day. Finding humor in that anxious setting has been the best medicine ever! I explain it to people as an “EMP” … electrical magnetic pulse … when I can’t remember my left from my right or forget how to speak. It eases the tension.

Mabry, Darlene Watson Caregiver

Darlene Watson Mabry – Caregiver

17. Who is your main caregiver? Do you understand what it takes to be a caregiver?

My MOM! And, yes, it has been so hard for her. I don’t know how she does it. She’s a

superhero to me!

18. What are your plans? What do you expect/hope to be doing ten years from now?

I still have my dreams that I will fulfill. They have just been altered. Instead of a “Game Designer” … it’s a “Game Broadcaster”; my physical-fitness regimens have been modified to walking instead of running. “Compromise” is what my mom calls it!

19. Are you able to provide a helpful hint that may have taken you a long time to learn, but which you wished you had known earlier? If so, please state what it is to potentially help other survivors with your specific kind of brain injury.

You may have setbacks, but that doesn’t mean the game is over!

20. What advice would you offer to other brain-injury survivors? Do you have any other comments that you would like to add?

Never give up – regardless of how bad it gets – because you belong to a special group now … you are a Survivor!

 

Gage’s mother wrote a moving “Faces of Brain Injury”  Click to read

Please leave a comment/question. I will respond.

(Clip Art compliments of Bing.)

As I say after each post: Please leave a comment by clicking the blue words “Leave a Commentanim0014-1_e0-1 below this post.

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SPEAK OUT! NewsBit . . . . . Blood Test Developed for Brain Injury

Blood Test Developed for Brain Injury

presented

by

Donna O’Donnell Figurski

 

th-1The Centers for Disease Control has reported that traumatic brain injury (TBI) accounts for more than 2.5 million visits to emergency rooms (ERs) in the US every year. Many people with a concussion do not even go to the ER because they have no symptoms and don’t believe that the ER can diagnose a brain injury if it’s not serious enough to be detected by a number of indirect tests. A CT (“cat”; computerized tomography) scan is usually ordered if a brain injury is suspected, but only 10% of CT scans detect a brain injury in people with a mild head injury.

thA quick, sensitive, and accurate blood test will soon be available for ERs EmergencyRoomto know if the brain has been injured. Some people will be negative. They will not need a CT scan and can go home with no worries. Others who are asymptomatic may actually discover that they’re positive for a brain injury. The ER doctor can then take appropriate action.

An objective blood test will be a game-changer for the treatment of TBIs. An obvious difference is that it will make many CT scans (and their radiation) unnecessary. On the other hand, people, especially those with a mild concussion, may discover they do have a brain injury and take appropriate steps. (Full story 1, 2)

 

(Clip Art compliments of Bing.)

As I say after each post: Please leave a comment by clicking the blue words “Leave a Commentanim0014-1_e0-1 below this post.

Feel free to follow my blog. Click on “Follow” on the upper right sidebar.

If you like my blog, share it (intact) with your friends. It’s easy! Click the “Share” buttons below.

If you don’t like my blog, “Share” it (intact) with your enemies. I don’t care!

Feel free to “Like” my post.

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