TBI – Survivors, Caregivers, Family, and Friends

Archive for January, 2016

Survivors SPEAK OUT! Jonathan Swiatocha

Survivors SPEAK OUT! Jonathan Swiatocha

presented

by

Donna O’Donnell Figurski

 

Swiatocha, Jonathan 2

Jonathan Swiatocha – TBI Survivor – Olympic Hopeful

1. What is your name? (last name optional)

Jonathan Swiatocha

2. Where do you live? (city and/or state and/or country) Email (optional)

Keller, Texas, USA     swiatochaj@gmail.com

3. On what date did you have your brain injury? At what age?

December 6, 2002

10 years old

4. How did your brain injury occur?

Jonathan Swiatocha 7 Accident

Jonathan Swiatocha – accident

My family and I were hit by a drunk underage driver. The drunk driver was driving up to 80 mph. When the collision occurred, my brain hit the right side of my skull.

5. When did you (or someone) first realize you had a problem?

When I was ten, the neurosurgeon and physicians told my parents that I had a high chance of recovering very quickly but the more severe effects of my traumatic brain injury (TBI) may appear in my twenties. In my early twenties, I was diagnosed as being clinically depressed, and I started to have vision problems. I’ve always known that I had problems from my TBI, but it wasn’t until my mom had me get evaluated by a psychologist that I was officially diagnosed with permanent brain damage. That’s when I knew for sure that something wasn’t right.

6. What kind of emergency treatment, if any, did you have?

I had surgery, was given a shunt, and was on a ventilator.

7. Were you in a coma? If so, how long?

Yes. I was in an induced coma for about three days.

Swiatocha, Jonathan 7 Therapy

Jonathan Swiatocha – age 10

8. Did you do rehab? What kind of rehab (i.e., inpatient or outpatient and occupational and/or physical and/or speech and/or other)? How long were you in rehab?

Yes. I was in inpatient care for eighteen days and in outpatient care for six months. I had occupational, physical, and speech therapies.

9. What problems or disabilities, if any, resulted from your brain injury
(e.g., balance, perception, personality, etc.)?

I have problems with cognitive functioning, perception, memory, depression, isolation, and vision. My personality has been affected. I have mood swings.

10. How has your life changed? Is it better? Is it worse?

My life is definitely not worse than before my TBI because I don’t remember what my life was like anyway. I am truly blessed for my life today, and I give thanks every single day for just being alive!

JS 1

Jonathan Swiatocha Speaker

11. What do you miss the most from your pre-brain-injury life?

I don’t miss anything from my pre-TBI life. I may not be the person I was before my TBI, but honestly, I have never missed the old me – not even for a second.

12. What do you enjoy most in your post-brain-injury life?

I enjoy being able to share my story with people an

d being an inspiration for the TBI community.

13. What do you like least about your brain injury?

I dislike the daily pain and suffering that resulted from my TBI.

14.Has anything helped you to accept your brain injury?

More than anything, my faith has helped me accept my TBI. I believe that everything happens for a reason, so, instead of dwelling on the past, I fight the good fight every day and keep moving forward.

15.Has your injury affected your home life and relationships and, if so, how?

Yes. My family has been affected more than anyone because they see the two sides of me. My mom and younger siblings have been especially emotionally affected over the years because of the severe emotional and behavioral effects from my TBI.

16. Has your social life been altered or changed and, if so, how?

I was not the most social person in the world before my TBI. Throughout middle school, high school, and college, I struggled to interact with and engage people my age. That forced me to isolate myself, which left me in a severely depressed state. Once I became a speaker and started to stand and talk in front of audiences, I started to slowly heal. I became more social and interactive with people, young and old. I still struggle at times with forming relationships and making new friends, but I have definitely come a long way from where I once was.

17. Who is your main caregiver? Do you understand what it takes to be a caregiver?

My main caregiver is my mother. Yes, I understand what it takes – you have to be both mentally and emotionally strong to be a caregiver.

Swiatocha, Jonathan Survivor 092915 jpg

Jonathan Swiatocha – Speaker

18. What are your plans? What do you expect/hope to be doing ten years from now?

My future plans include being an international speaker, writing a book, and becoming the first Olympic runner with a traumatic brain injury. In ten years, I hope to have a family and a successful career and to have moved one step closer to achieving all my goals.

19. Are you able to provide a helpful hint that may have taken you a long time to learn, but which you wished you had known earlier? If so, please state what it is to potentially help other survivors with your specific kind of brain injury.

Even when all hope seems lost, you can always be raised up out of the ashes and into the light! I know it’s a fight every day, but the healing from TBI starts by staying faithful, staying humble, and living with a purpose.

Swiatocha, Jonathan 4 Survivor 092915

Jonathan Swiatocha – Runner

20. What advice would you offer to other brain-injury survivors? Do you have any other comments that you would like to add?

My advice to all survivors is – never lose hope! I know what it is to be depressed. I know what PTSD (post-traumatic stress disorder) is. Giving up or taking your own life is never the answer. I was very close to ending my own life a couple of years ago because I was tired of all of the pain and suffering. Please hear me – your life has meaning. You’re alive today for a reason! Keep fighting the good fight, and never give up!

 

Follow my journey to the Olympics.

Facebook: Run To Victory

Twitter: @JS_Victory

Instagram: @runtovictory

website: linkedin.com/in/runtovictory

blog: jsvictory.blogspot.com

 

(Disclaimer: The views or opinions in this post are solely that of the interviewee.)

If you would like to be a part of the SPEAK OUT! project, please go to TBI Survivor Interview Questionnaire for a copy of the questions and the release form.

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(Photos compliments of contributor.)

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SPEAK OUT! NewsBit . . . . . Mental Decline Causes a Hero of Super Bowl XL to Regret Playing Professional Football

Mental Decline Causes a Hero of Super Bowl XL to

Regret Playing Professional Football

presented

by

Donna O’Donnell Figurski

 

Newsboy thAmerican football wide receiver Antwaan Randle El, who played for the Pittsburgh Steelers, is fondly remembered for doing a reverse and then throwing a touchdown pass to ice the National Football League’s Super Bowl XL, played February 2006 against the Seattle Seahawks. The final score was 21-10.

th-1

Antwaan Randle El #82 former Pittsburgh Steeler

Randle El retired early in 2010. Now 36, he has trouble with his memory and has difficulty on stairs. He fears what the violence of football has done to his brain and regrets playing professionally. An all-around athlete, Randle El had been drafted by the Chicago Cubs, a U.S. professional team in Major League Baseball, but his life-path brought him to football. He said in an interview by the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, “If I could go back, I wouldn’t (play football.) I would play baseball.”

 

antwaan-randle-el-0071-002

Antwaan Randle El – former Pittsburgh Steeler

Randle El wants to see his kids grow up and to know his grandkids. He is aware of recent brain research and the problems associated with playing football, so he is worried about his own neurological health. He said, “It’s a tough pill to swallow because I love the game of football. … It just comes down to it’s a physically violent game. … I wouldn’t be surprised if football isn’t around in 20, 25 years.” (Full story)

 

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So, Whaddya Think? . . . . . . . . . My Opinion: Football Is Safer With Kevlar Helmet Inserts

So, Whaddya Think?

My Opinion: Football Is Safer With Kevlar Helmet Inserts

by

Mike Doherty

presented

by

Donna O’Donnell FigurskiSo Whaddya Think Brain th-4

As a youth football coach, I am infuriated that more isn’t being done to spread the word about a great product out there that would greatly reduce the number of concussions. I came across it two years ago. It’s cheap, and you’d think the powers-that-be would jump all over it. Nope!

Southern Methodist University (SMU) did a study when their football players used this inexpensive piece of equipment in their helmets. The concussion rate dropped impressively.

American football is really a safe sport, considering the amount of contact involved. It’s just garnering the most attention because of the National Football League (NFL), where you have much bigger, stronger, and MUCH faster athletic men trying to hit each other. It’s controlled violence.

Mike doherty

Mike Doherty – TBI Survivor

Coaches now go through a lot of training on how to teach kids the proper way of tackling and how to recognize the possibility of a concussion. Trust me, it is probably the most important issue that’s been addressed on the field in the last few years. I’m glad concussions are finally being addressed. All in all, at the youth level, football is still pretty safe as compared with other sports. High school, college, and the pros are where you see concussions pick up. (The non-helmeted sports, like soccer and girls’ lacrosse, don’t get nearly the attention they should. For the life of me, I can’t understand why helmets are not worn in girls’ lacrosse.)

What’s the flip side of removing some of these sports for youths? The kids may then get into trouble doing crazy stuff. As kids, we did crazy stuff just being boys, and I played football.

Unequal Gyro

Inside of helmet with Unequal Gyro

That equipment I mentioned above is a helmet insert from Unequal Technologies. It’s a pad lined with Kevlar, the same material used in military helmets. It inserts into each helmet and disperses the energy from an

Kevlar for Football

The Unequal Gyro

impact throughout the pad, reducing greatly the severity of the impact itself. Unequal Technologies also promotes a headband for helmetless sports.

(Disclaimer: The views or opinions in this post are solely that of the contributor.)

So, Whaddya Think?

Let’s get a dialogue going. Post your comments in the Comment Section. Directions are below.

So . . . what do you think? Is there something you are passionate about in this Brain Injury (BI) world? Do you want to be heard? Your opinion matters! You can SPEAK OUT! on “So Whaddya Think?”

Simply send me your opinion, and I will format it for publication. Posts may be short, but please send no more than 500 words. Send to Neelyf@aol.com

I hope to HEAR from you soon.

As I say after each post:

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(Photos compliments of contributor)

 

 

On The Air: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Brain Injury Radio . . . . . . . . “Another Fork in the Road” with Ann Boriskie, Director of Brain Injury Peer Visitor Assn.

On The Air: Brain Injury Radio “Another Fork in the Road” 

with

Guest: Ann Boriskie, Director of Brain Injury Peer Visitor Assn.

presented

by

Donna O’Donnell Figurski

Boriskie, Ann Training in Florida Survivor 011116Ann Boriskie, a TBI survivor of more than 17-years says, “Get involved. Volunteer.” “By helping others with a brain injury, you truly help yourself in so many ways.” Ann is the Brain Injury Peer Visitor Association Director and her motto is “YOU CAN!”Peer Visitation BannerBoriskie, Ann Survivor 011116

 If you missed this show with Ann Boriskie on “Another Fork in the Road” on January 17th, 2016 don’t fret. You can listen to the archived show here. Click the link below.

See you “On the Air!”

On The Air: Brain Injury Radio “Another Fork in the Road” with Ann Boriskie, Director of Brain Injury Peer Visitor Assn.

(Clip Art compliments of Bing.)
As I say after each post: Please leave a comment by clicking the blue words “Leave a Comment” below this post.
Feel free to follow my blog. Click on “Follow” on the upper right sidebar.
 If you like my blog, share it intact with your friends. It’s easy! Click the “Share” buttons below.
 If you don’t like my blog, “Share” it intact with your enemies. I don’t care!
 Feel free to “Like” my post.

 

SPEAK OUT! NewsBit . . . . . Jonathan Swiatocha – TBI Survivor Training for Olympic Marathon

Jonathan Swiatocha – TBI Survivor Training for Olympic Marathon

presented

by

Donna O’Donnell Figurski

Newsboy thIn 2002, the vehicle Jonathan Swiotocha was driving was broadsided by a drunk driver. One of Jonathan’s injuries was a traumatic brain injury (TBI), which put him into a coma and left him paralyzed from the waist down. He maintains that his “greatest athletic achievement” was taking his first step. Now he is a marathon runner and is training for the 2020 Olympics.Swaitosha, Jonathan Survivor 092915 12071738_1188221344525066_1019010021_n Jonathan hopes to be the first TBI survivor to participate in the Olympics. He is bringing awareness to brain injury, and he is an inspiration to survivors. In addition to his rigorous training, Jonathan gave a TED Talk Thursday night, January 14, 2016. Jonathan’s SPEAK OUT! interview for this blog will be published shortly. (Video and story)

(Clip Art compliments of Bing.)

(Photos compliments of Jonathan Swiatocha.)

As I say after each post: Please leave a comment by clicking the blue words “Leave a Commentanim0014-1_e0-1 below this post.

Feel free to follow my blog. Click on “Follow” on the upper right sidebar.

If you like my blog, share it (intact) with your friends. It’s easy! Click the “Share” buttons below.

If you don’t like my blog, “Share” it (intact) with your enemies. I don’t care!

Feel free to “Like” my post.

Survivors SPEAK OUT! Ann Boriskie

Survivors SPEAK OUT! Ann Boriskie

presented

by

Donna O’Donnell Figurski

 

Boriskie, Ann Survivor 011116

Ann Boriskie – Survivor: Brain Injury Peer Visitor Association Director

 

1. What is your name? (last name optional)

Ann Boriskie

2. Where do you live? (city and/or state and/or country) Email (optional)

Alpharetta, Georgia, USA (a suburb of Atlanta, Georgia) aboriskie@braininjurypeervisitor.org

3. On what date did you have your brain injury? At what age?

November 12, 1998, at age 48

4. How did your brain injury occur?

My brain injury occurred in a car wreck less than five miles from home. I was headed to a regular dental checkup.

A woman was talking on her phone while driving, and she obviously missed her turn. She stopped suddenly, but I was able to stop my car and not hit her at all. She just sat there at the bottom of a hill on the two-lane road. She did not move. A young student (16 years old) came down the hill. He said he was messing with his radio and just did not see us. He hit my car going 50 mph and pushed my car into the woman’s car.

5. When did you (or someone) first realize you had a problem?

About 48 hours after my wreck, I started having concussion symptoms. I experienced dizziness and mental “fogginess.” I could not walk. There was bruising under my eyes. The toes on my right foot went numb. My left eye was out of focus.

6. What kind of emergency treatment, if any, did you have?

None. I walked away from the wreck thinking I was just fine. After 48 hours, I went to a 24-hour clinic, but they just sent me home. They told me I had no real problems and I would be fine. I also went to an eye doctor right away, but again, I was told there that nothing was wrong physically with my eye. Several months after my wreck, one neurologist told me that I had “post-concussion syndrome” and to go home – that I would be just fine. No one else mentioned my having a brain injury for one year. Then a dental TMJ specialist told me that I had a brain injury. That was what was causing my mental symptoms. (TMJ = temporomandibular joint)Peer Visitation Banner

7. Were you in a coma? If so, how long?

No

8. Did you do rehab? What kind of rehab (i.e., inpatient or outpatient and occupational and/or physical and/or speech and/or other)? How long were you in rehab?

My brain injury went undiagnosed for over a year. The physical therapy that I received was in relation to each of my physical injuries (see #9), especially to help after the surgeries that I had to have to repair the parts of my body that were injured.

9. What problems or disabilities, if any, resulted from your brain injury
(e.g., balance, perception, personality, etc.)?

a. My brain injury caused depression, anxiety, and anger (more so in the first several years). I had lots of memory issues. (I could not remember friends or faces. I got lost. I could not write. Then once I could write, I couldn’t write in cursive – I still can’t.) Some memory issues remain today. I permanently lost many of my past memories. (I can’t remember family events or experiences or places where we had lived. I lost memory of cities and our time there.) I lost a lot of my math skills (I was an A+ math student, and I was in advanced math classes), but I have regained many of these math skills.

b. My neck was injured. (The C4, C5, C6, and C7 vertebrae were knocked out of line.) I had to have neck surgery (for fusion and a metal plate holding these four levels together). My neck is in CONSTANT PAIN.

c. I had an injury to the L5 and S1 levels of my spine. (The last two vertebrae are not attached now to my spinal cord). Surgery was recommended, but my neck did not fuse properly, so I decided not to have back surgery. I am in CONSTANT PAIN in my lower back. The pain often radiates to my hips and legs.

d. I popped a tendon from its bone in my right elbow. (I braced my body on the steering wheel in the wreck.) It required surgery. The doctor said it was one of the worst tears he had ever seen.

e. Permanent nerve damage was created in various body areas.

f. The left part of my jaw was knocked out of line. It literally took years of appliance therapy to get the bone back into its correct place.

g. A valve was torn on the left side of my heart. This caused irregular heartbeats for a while. It repaired itself.

h. My left side remains weaker than my right side.

i. Numbness remains in my hands (which makes it harder to use my hands). I also have numbness in my feet, down my arms, and down my legs.

j. Sometimes my left eye will not focus or work well with my right eye.

k. I have a shorter attention span.

l. All of these physical injuries caused me to have fibromyalgia and constant body pains.

Boriskie, Ann Podium

Ann Boriskie – Survivor

10. How has your life changed? Is it better? Is it worse?

In the long run, I have to say my life is truly better. All three of our children are in the medical field. (My husband and I have raised one daughter, now a neonatologist who takes care of premature babies and helps the moms; raised a son, now a doctor of internal medicine who works as a hospitalist; and raised another daughter, now a Registered Nurse in a mental-illness hospital unit.)

My priorities changed in my life. I went from being a “work-oholic” and a person who was very competitive to a person who lives to help other people, including my family and friends.

I slowed down my life’s pace. I had to learn that I could no longer work at a full-time outside-the-home job. (For years, I could not work at all.) I also had to learn to take care of myself – due to all of the physical and mental problems that the wreck created.

I was at home, and thus I was “there” more for my children and husband. I was able to give them more help and more attention.

11. What do you miss the most from your pre-brain-injury life?

I miss my higher energy level. I miss many of my memories. I miss all of the physical sports and activities that I can no longer do (water skiing, snow skiing, kayaking, swimming, playing golf, etc.).

12. What do you enjoy most in your post-brain-injury life?Peer Visitor Banner

I enjoy running the Brain Injury Peer Visitor Association and being able to help thousands of brain-injury and stroke survivors throughout the United States and the world. I’ve done this each year since 2006.

13. What do you like least about your brain injury?

I dislike being in constant pain (which also affects my brain). I also dislike having to push myself more and having to work much harder to accomplish my goals and to do my work than I did prior to my wreck.

14. Has anything helped you to accept your brain injury?

  1. Helping other people helps me also.
  2. Sharing my experiences with others and listening to each brain-injury survivor’s problems (This helps me to better understand my own brain injury.)
  3. Attending support-groups (and being very open to sharing my own problems, experiences, successes, and methodologies)
  4. In the past, gaining the help of neuropsychologists
  5. Going to medical doctors who treat brain injury (e.g., a psychiatrist)

15. Has your injury affected your home life and relationships and, if so, how?

Yes. I am much more dedicated to my husband and three children. I treasure our relationships. I also treasure my friendships more. You really better understand that life is way too short and can change in a second.

16. Has your social life been altered or changed and, if so, how?

Yes. I no longer like to be in big crowds or in a noisy environment. Going to a party is now a struggle and sometimes a chore. I just avoid noisy places and huge crowds. This requirement definitely limits the activities in which I can participate.

17. Who is your main caregiver? Do you understand what it takes to be a caregiver?

My wonderful husband is my main caregiver. I am blessed that he “stuck it out” with me and helped me go through all of my physical and mental recoveries. He is also one of my biggest supporters – even financially supporting my association and approving of all of the volunteer hours that I dedicate to the Brain Injury Peer Visitor Association.

Boriskie, Ann Training in Florida Survivor 011116

Annn Boriskie – Survivor

18. What are your plans? What do you expect/hope to be doing ten years from now?

I plan to continue running the Brain Injury Peer Visitor Association as long as I possibly can. My dream is to continue to grow the association throughout the United States and even internationally.

I also plan to continue to enjoy and spend time with my immediate family and their families.

19. Are you able to provide a helpful hint that may have taken you a long time to learn, but which you wished you had known earlier? If so, please state what it is to potentially help other survivors with your specific kind of brain injury.

Accept your limitations, but continue to “push yourself” to improve. Realize that, even though you are different from the pre-TBI you, you are still a valuable person in the world. Let your “old self” go. Realize that person won’t be back. Embrace the “new you,” and learn to love yourself for who you now are. Remember that YOU CAN. Don’t defeat yourself by focusing on all of the things you can no longer do.

2011 Community Service Awards from WXIA 11

20. What advice would you offer to other brain-injury survivors? Do you have any other comments that you would like to add?

Help others. Get involved. Volunteer. By helping others with a brain injury, you truly help yourself in so many ways. You will help yourself get better, and you will gain confidence.

 

You can hear Ann Boriskie on my radio show, “Another Fork in the Road” at 5:30pm PT (6:30MT, 7:30CT, 8:30ET) on Sunday, January 17th on the Brain Injury Radio Network (BIRN)

Click here on Sunday 5:30pm Pacific Time. Another Fork in the Road: Ann Boriskie – Director of Brain Injury Peer Visitor 

You can call in to listen to the show or talk to the host by dialing this number. 424-243-9540

(Disclaimer: The views or opinions in this post are solely that of the interviewee.)

If you would like to be a part of the SPEAK OUT! project, please go to TBI Survivor Interview Questionnaire for a copy of the questions and the release form.

(Clip Art compliments of Bing.)

(Photos compliments of contributor.)

As I say after each post: Please leave a comment by clicking the blue words “Leave a Commentanim0014-1_e0-1 below this post.

Feel free to follow my blog. Click on “Follow” on the upper right sidebar.

If you like my blog, share it intact with your friends. It’s easy! Click the “Share” buttons below.

If you don’t like my blog, “Share” it intact with your enemies. I don’t care!

Feel free to “Like” my post.

 

So, Whaddya Think? . . . . . Football Puts Children’s Brains at Risk

So, Whaddya Think?

Football Puts Children’s Brains at Risk

by

David Figurski and Donna O’Donnell Figurski

(Note: This is our third opinion essay on brain trauma and American football. The first and second were published on this blog on December 17th and December 26th, respectively.)

 

So Whaddya Think Brain th-4Lack of awareness of new knowledge has allowed society to continue what some of us now know to be dangerous practices with respect to children. To understand what we mean, watch these short videos of children practicing or playing American football (1, 2, 3, 4, 5).

The danger to the brains of children in the videos is readily apparent to us (video, story). Parents often believe a brain injury is rare. But the evidence indicates otherwise. The hundreds of sub-concussive hits that a player of American football receives each season can result in the degenerative brain disease, chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). CTE can lead to loss of memory, loss of cognitive ability, dementia, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), aggressive behavior, depression, and suicidal thoughts. It has been seen in the brains of high school football players. In fact, individuals who started playing organized American football at a young age seem to have a higher rate of CTE.

Bennet Omalu

Dr. Bennet Omalu – neuropathologist – discovered CTE

Recently, Dr. Bennet Omalu, who discovered CTE in an American football player by studying the brain of Hall-of-Fame center Mike Webster, was the author of a recent New York Times Op-Ed entitled Don’t Let Kids Play Football. In an interview for zap2it.com, Dr. Omalu said, “As a modern society it’s our duty to protect our most vulnerable, most precious gifts of life: our children. This is where I stand.”

(We highly recommend your seeing the newly released movie Concussion, which will bring about more awareness of the danger to the brain from playing American football. The movie tells the true story of how the National Football League – NFL – tried to dismiss Dr. Bennet Omalu’s discovery of the connection of brain disease and the playing of American football. Former players are suing the NFL, claiming that the NFL knew of the dangers, but did not inform the players.)kid-football-players-clip-art

In the documentary Head Games (online and free), we are reminded that children are not miniature adults. A child’s head is larger than an adult’s in proportion to his or her body. The neck muscles are not proportionately stronger, so a child’s head is more vulnerable than is an adult’s head. Brain development continues until at least age 14. (Some neurologists think brain development may continue longer.) In addition, the neurons in a developing brain are not yet fully myelinated. Recent research has shown that a concussion in a child impairs brain function for two years. The risk to the brain is the major reason why US Soccer banned heading for children 10 and under.

George Visger

Former San Francisco 49er – George Visger – TBI Survivor

On August 16th, Donna conducted a radio interview with George Visger, a former defensive lineman for the NFL’s San Francisco 49ers on her radio show, “Another Fork in the Road,” on the Brain Injury Radio Network. Visger stated that youth football might ultimately end because of the eventual high cost of liability insurance (minutes 30:25-33:45; we think you will also find the intervals 5:40-15:55 and 39:40-42:25 interesting because of their contents – children and football). Dr. Omalu, the discoverer of CTE in an American football player, says in Frontline’s documentary The League of Denial: The NFL’s Concussion Crisis that he was told if 10% of mothers think playing football is too dangerous, it will mean the end of football.

The consequences of a brain injury can be especially devastating, even fatal, to a young player (video 1, video 2, story of the suicide of a teenage football player). The risk of brain injury from high-impact sports, especially American football, is significant even for adults, but an adult can make his or her own decision to play. In contrast, children rely on parents and Brain in Helmetcoaches. No parent would deliberately put a child’s life-trajectory at risk, but what if the parent lacks awareness? The good news is that apparently society’s awareness is growing quickly. Peter Landesman, the director of Concussion, said that Pop Warner football enrollment is down by more than 30%. (Pop Warner football is for children aged 5 to 16.) The movie Concussion will further increase society’s awareness of the danger of concussions and sub-concussive hits, show what CTE is, tell Dr. Bennet Omalu’s story of his discovery of the relationship of CTE and American football, and show Dr. Omalu’s struggle with the NFL.

Healthy and Damaged Brain

Left – Healthy Brain — Right – Brain with CTE

It is also the brain-injury community’s responsibility to speak out to show society how life-altering a brain injury is.

 

 

 

So, Whaddya Think?

Let’s get a dialogue going. Post your comments in the Comment Section. Directions are below.

So . . . what do you think? Is there something you are passionate about in this Brain Injury (BI) world? Do you want to be heard? Your opinion matters! You can SPEAK OUT! on “So Whaddya Think?”

Simply send me your opinion, and I will format it for publication. Posts may be short, but please send no more than 500 words. Send to Neelyf@aol.com

I hope to HEAR from you soon.

As I say after each post:

Feel free to leave a comment by clicking the blue words “Leave a Comment” below this post.

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No memory of the day that changed my life

My name is Michelle Munt and this is my story about surviving a brain injury and what I continue to learn about it. This is for other survivors and their loved ones, but also to raise awareness of what can happen to those in an accident. This invisible injury too often goes undiagnosed and it can be difficult to find information about it. I will talk about things that have helped me as I continue to recover and invite others to see if it works for them too.

Everything and nothing. GM1123 😊

Bienvenue. I’m thinking this is the spot where I am to write a witty, flowery personal section that pulls you in......I got nuthin’

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