TBI – Survivors, Caregivers, Family, and Friends

SPEAK OUT! Itty-Bitty GIANT Steps

Itty-Bitty GIant Steps for Blog

SPEAK OUT! Itty-Bitty Giant Steps will provide a venue for brain-injury survivors and caregivers to shout out their accomplishments of the week.

If you have an Itty-Bitty Giant Step and you would like to share it, just send an email to me at donnaodonnellfigurski@gmail.com.

If you are on Facebook, you can simply send a Private Message to me. It need only be a sentence or two. I’ll gather the accomplishments and post them with your name on my blog approximately once a week. (If you do not want your last name to be posted, please tell me in your email or Private Message.)

I hope we have millions of Itty-Bitty Giant Steps.

Here are this week’s Itty-Bitty Giant Steps.

Karen Hubbard Allen (survivor)…I have an Itty-Bitty Giant Step story. I just suffered another hard blow – to my forehead this time. This will be my third concussion. I fell backwards on ice in 2008, hitting my head. November 18th is when I had the most recent one. It proved to me that the brain controls different things. I just started up with a heel issue, called plantar fasciitis. Getting out of bed in the morning is when the pain hurts the most. I got out of bed, and my knee buckled, causing me to fall into the dresser and the wall and hitting my forehead. I have been a smoker since 2003. Well, whatever part of my brain I hit this time – I no longer smoke; it makes me sick. Sad that this is what made me quit smoking. Yet, it’s a big accomplishment for me.

Derrick Roy Clements (survivor)…I did a Snoopy dance today when I left the eye doctor. I was able to ditch the prism glasses and go to regular glasses. I was also told that they would not be doing any more surgery on my eye orbital and that the plate they put in for it was good. I have permanent nerve damage, such that when I look down, my vision will always be double. One step closer. What everyone, including me, will know is the “final” new me. I still can’t drive yet, but in time I hope to. I know I will never be able to drive an 18-wheeler again, but I am OK with this. I just want to ride my Harley-Davidson, for my heart longs for this. I feel free and alive when I ride. But, today was a victory, and the fight continues. Strength to all.

I live by my motto – Never give up, and never give in.

Natalie Elliott (survivor)…I watched a movie with subtitles. My brain was exhausted afterwards, but I watched the whole thing.

10805531_10152948796301834_531981836_nJo Emery (caregiver)…Luke built me some bookshelves for our lounge room. I designed what I 1502486_10152948796241834_3069128791965391225_nwanted, gave him all the measurements needed, and worked out the timber required. He bought the timber, cut the shelves, and put it together inside, as it was so big. It took about two weeks for him to make it. I love how it turned out, and Luke is very pleased (as he should be). He loves his woodworking and has great ideas, although the difficulty he has is going from his ideas to carrying them out.

Monica Rowe Foutz (family member)…My mother-in-law, Wanda McGuffin, is 5 months post TBI. Today she stood from a seated position without using her hands. It’s itty-bitty to some, but it’s huge to us.

Barb George…Alrighty! I have been working with an old friend to develop a “Different-Ability Walk, Roll and Stroll.” We have a date (May 16, 2015, in Hoquiam, WA)! I’m VERY excited. It was put together by Grays Harbor Brain Injury Support Group and ME, their insane leader (grin). We have had GREAT response already!

Orpha Harber-Blanchat (caregiver)…I’m happy to report my husband gets his G-tube out tomorrow. His accident was on June 25th. He was coming home from work and was hit by a semi that didn’t stop at a red light. David was in a self-induced coma for 30 days and in hospitals for 80. He is now at a rehab center doing well.

Richard Johnson (survivor)…Shoveling snow…I hate it, hate it, hate it. But I did it, did it, did it. Monday night and Tuesday morning.

Carmen Gaarder Kumm (survivor)…I spent a day at a craft retreat with friends this weekend, and then I came home. I worked three days, and then I cleaned the church the next day. I’m proud that I didn’t have a meltdown.

Michelle Casto Lyons (caregiver)…An Itty-Bitty Giant Step accomplishment: my hubby has been seizure-free for 7 days, AND he made dinner TWICE this week!

Sandra-Madden-Hearts-All-Around-us~~element78Sandy Smachetti Madden (survivor)…I am a published author. My book shipped from the publisher today!! Check it out. Hearts All Around Us. Thanks!!

Corina Mendoza (survivor)…My Itty-Bitty Giant Step is a major step in a positive direction for me. I started my teacher certification in Special Ed, with a focus on blind/visually impaired students and family/consumer sciences for my degree in Hospitality Management.

Scott Sheehan (survivor)…I am building a soundproof fort for my female rescue cat. I also bought a drum set after 6 years of pain, and I am going to train to break a record – 84 hours of play. Gotta take step one. That I’ve learned. Besides being hit by a car three times, having my head smashed into a pipe, and diving into a 4-ft. pool, I walk, talk, and basically defy death EVERY day. (The doctors said that the same injury took Christopher Reeve.) My 18-month rescue cat, Milo, dropped dead in front of me and Babie, his sister. That pain makes the rest nothing. I bought a drum set with his colors and dedicate this to him. Now it gets hard. I play like no other – in a way that “can’t be done.” I’m always underestimated because of my TBI. Now the impossible – 1600 songs with the focus to spin and flip a stick every beat. In front of millions, billions, I hope. The best show ever played! Ambitious? Ha! Easy! The training, choreography, and practice – that’s the hard part. Always said they will laugh and say you can’t do it. But, do the impossible. You are special. Here to change the world. For 84 hours.

Lc Sossaman (survivor)…Every day is a challenge. I went to the grocery store and got the two things on my list (LOL), cleaned the house, and fed the goats and animals. I woke up to snow, but I was still able to get these things done. Cold days are usually hard on me, due to arthritis in places after the wreck, but today went fine. I try to keep discouragement and negativity away.

Amanda Spencer (caregiver)…Ed and I are celebrating 1 year together today!

Danielle Virden (caregiver)…Mine is about my 2-year-old son. Nathan started saying “mommy” and laughing, and he’s learning to sit up.

Sandra Williams (survivor)…I just learned that my organization and memory increased from very low to 90th percentile. The therapies paid off! I still struggle with perception and cognition, but I am working on that too.

Next goal is to begin running again. I want to run a marathon.

YOU did it!

Congratulations to all contributors!

(Clip Art compliments of Bing.)

  SPEAK OUT! – GeorgeAnna Bell

by

Donna O’Donnell Figurski

10570970_836853459658124_752128615_n1. What is your name? (last name optional)

GeorgeAnna

2. Where do you live? (city and/or state and/or country) Email (optional)

San Tan Valley, Arizona, USA

3. When did you have your TBI? At what age?

My first was at the age of 6 years old. I have had multiple concussions as a child. I had yet another head injury in 2001 and another concussion from another car accident on June 25, 2014. I am now 40 years old.

4. How did your TBI occur?

My first brain injury was from a bicycle accident – I lost control of my bike. I flipped over the handlebars and landed on the right side of my head, cracking my skull. The concussions were from falls; sports; an ATV (all terrain vehicle); motor vehicle accidents; rapes; abuse; falls; and being young, foolish, and idiotic.

5. When did you (or someone) first realize you had a problem?

My parents realized I was a different child the day they brought me home from the hospital.

6. What kind of emergency treatment, if any, did you have?

I’ve been treated by the ICU (intensive care unit). I’ve had eye/vision therapy and cognitive behavior therapy. I attended specialized schools – junior high school and senior high school – that were for children with mental, emotional, physical, and developmental disabilities.

7. Were you in a coma? If so, how long?

Yes     72 hours

8. Did you do rehab? What kind of rehab (i.e., inpatient or outpatient and occupational and/or physical and/or speech and/or other)? How long were you in rehab?

I did not go to a rehab center. I got everything from schools, specialized doctors, etc.

9. What problems or disabilities, if any, resulted from your TBI
(e.g., balance, perception, personality, etc.)?

I have a balance problem, dizziness, seizures, short- and long-term memory loss, mental illness (anxiety, depression, mood disorder, personality disorder), cognitive issues, social issues and social anxiety, headaches and migraines, numbness and tingling in my extremities, ringing in my ears (the ear, nose, and throat specialist calls it tinnitus), insomnia, vision and hearing issues (optic and audio nerve damage), and blurred vision (on and off). I am easily confused and distracted. (For example, I cannot multitask. I have to do one thing at a time. Otherwise, I get flustered and stressed out.) I am sensitive to lights, sounds, or distractions. I developed fibromyalgia, tremors, and speech issues, all of which the doctor thinks are the result of my head injury. I also have arthritis (rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis). I have a developmental disability (due to the age at which I sustained my first head injury) and learning disabilities. I attended a special educational school from 7th grade until my senior year because I could not stay mainstream in a public school.

10. How has your life changed? Is it better? Is it worse?

I honestly do not know because I was so young when my first head injury occurred. However, over the years, I have sustained multiple head injuries. (For example, because of a short-term coma and concussions, I have increased mental, emotional, and physical issues.)

11. What do you miss the most from your pre-TBI life?

I wouldn’t remember what it was like before because I was only 6 years old when I sustained my first head injury.

12. What do you enjoy most in your post-TBI life?

I am grateful for my Significant Other – the ONLY person I personally know who is supportive of me and tries to be understanding.

13. What do you like least about your TBI?

I dislike how people treat me. People act as if I am some kind of idiot because I am slower than others, and then they look at me as if I have serious issues. I hate being judged. I want people to treat me as I would treat them. I don’t want them to judge me and look at me and say, “Well, you look fine.”

14. Has anything helped you to accept your TBI?

People’s ignorant behaviors and idiosyncrasies

15. Has your injury affected your home life and relationships and, if so, how?

My parents did not want to deal with my issues. They did not allow me to speak of my issues to anyone because it embarrassed them that they had a child with a disability. They still do not like my talking about my disabilities and TBI. However, I tell them I am a full-grown adult now, and I say to them, “If you do not like it, do not listen.”

16. Has your social life been altered or changed and, if so, how?

I have issues keeping friends. People tend to easily get annoyed with me. I tend to get frustrated easily, too. As for relationship with guys, I was always told I am a very taxing person – annoying, weird, and psychotic. I have had nicknames given to me by guys over the years: pain-in-my-ass, crack baby, wacko, weirdo, dumbass, stupid, idiot, retarded, sensitive bitch, nagging bitch, crazy, worthless.

17. Who is your main caregiver? Do you understand what it takes to be a caregiver?

My main caregiver is my boyfriend. No, I do not understand what it takes to be a caregiver.

18. What are your future plans? What do you expect/hope to be doing ten years from now?

I would love to open a 501c3 animal shelter and help unwanted animals – mainly dogs. I would like to extend the knowledge I currently have on animal studies and have better knowledge and understanding of the animal behavior.

19. Are you able to provide a helpful hint that may have taken you a long time to learn, but which you wished you had known earlier? If so, please state what it is to potentially help other TBI survivors with your specific kind of TBI.

Do not stop trying. Eventually it will work out.

20. What advice would you offer to other TBI survivors? Do you have any other comments that you would like to add?

I encourage you to just try your best and keep trying. Do not give up. Once you give up, you lose everything, and it is not easy to get everything back again – even if you are able to get things back again.10695279_836854542991349_1216029697_n

 

Thank you, GeorgeAnna, for taking part in this interview. I hope that your experience will offer some hope, comfort, and inspiration to my readers.

(Disclaimer: The views or opinions in this post are solely that of the interviewee.)

If you would like to be a part of the SPEAK OUT! project, please go to TBI Survivor Interview Questionnaire for a copy of the questions and the release form.

(Photos compliments of GeorgeAnna.)

On the Air – Brain Injury Radio

Interview with Melissa Cronin, author of “Invisible Bruise”

in “Chicken Soup for the Soul: Recovering From Traumatic Brain Injuries”

Melissa CroninMelissa shares her life both before and after her TBI. She said she was an energetic child who loved to run and play. In college she became a serious student as she pursued her career as a pediatric and a neonatal nurse, a career she loved. But, Melissa’s nursing career ended on that fateful day when a car went rogue careening through 2 1/2 blocks of the Santa Monica, California Farmer’s Market leaving Melissa with not only broken bones and a ruptured spleen, but also with a Traumatic Brain Injury.Melissa playing fiddle

Melissa has picked up the pieces and has found new loves. Her Irish fiddle; her husband, John; and her new career as a writer are just some of her newly adopted loves (NOT in that order).

If you missed Melissa’s interview, don’t fret. You can always listen to the archived show. I’ve included the link below.9781611592399_p0_v3_s260x420

Please SHARE!

I hope you’ll tune in to my show, “Another Fork in the Road,” which airs the 1st and 3rd Sunday evenings of every month. The show starts at 5:00p Pacific Time and runs for 90 minutes. On the fifth Sunday in a month, Julie Kintz, Host of “Quantum Leap,” and I team up to cohost a show called “Another Quantum Leap in the Road.”

See you “On the Air!”

Interview with Melissa Cronin, Author of “Invisible Bruise”

YOU ARE INVITED!

putthis_on_calendar_clip_art

Melissa Cronin was strolling through the Santa Monica Farmer’s Market when an elderly man lost control of his car and barreled into the crowd. That changed her life forever. Now Melissa lives with an ‘invisible bruise.’ But Melissa picked up the pieces and is embarking on a new life. Hear how she copes and thrives after her Traumatic Brain Injury.

Come One! Come ALL!

(NOTE: New Day, Sunday – Same Time)

What:        Interview with Melissa Cronin, Author of “Invisible Bruise” in “Chicken Soup for the Soul: Recovering From Traumatic Brain Injuries”

Why:        Hear Melissa’s perspective of living with Traumatic Brain Injury

Where:     Brain Injury Radio Network

When:       Sunday, November 16, 2014

Time:         5:00p PT (6:00p MT, 7:00p CT, and 8:00p ET) 90 minute show

How:         Click: Brain Injury Radio Network

Call In:    424-243-9540

Call In:     855-473-3711 toll free in USA

Call In:    202-559-7907 free outside US

or SKYPE

If you miss the show, but would like to still hear the interview, you can access the archive on On Demand listening. The archived show will be available after the show both on the Brain Injury Radio Network site and on my blog in “On the Air.”

(Clip Art compliments of Bing.)

Survivors SPEAK OUT! Judy F.

SPEAK OUT! – Judy F.

by

Donna O’Donnell Figurski

Judy

Judy F.

 1. What is your name? (last name optional)

Judy F.

2. Where do you live? (city and/or state and/or country) Email (optional)

Welland, Ontario, Canada

3. When did you have your TBI? At what age?

I was born with hydrocephalus, and I have had several TBIs in my life.

4. How did your TBI occur?

In 2013, I had a problem from a mini-stroke and/or low blood flow during one.

5. When did you (or someone) first realize you had a problem?

We realized there was a problem about a month after the stroke occurred.

6. What kind of emergency treatment, if any, did you have?

I had surgery due to high intercranial pressure on May 15, 2013.

7. Were you in a coma? If so, how long?

No

8. Did you do rehab? What kind of rehab (i.e., inpatient or outpatient and occupational and/or physical and/or speech and/or other)? How long were you in rehab?

I receive medical support from a team of experts on an outpatient basis (neurologist, family doctor, occupational therapist, massage therapist, osteopath, pharmacist, social worker, and psychologist). I am still doing what is known as “work hardening”  (an individualized treatment program designed to maximize a person’s ability to return to work).

9. What problems or disabilities, if any, resulted from your TBI
(e.g., balance, perception, personality, etc.)?

I am unable to work at this time due to balance, short-term memory, and processing issues.  I also have mental fatigue (i.e., I need a daily afternoon nap).

10. How has your life changed? Is it better? Is it worse?

Better – slower day   Worse – my TBI-caused problems

11. What do you miss the most from your pre-TBI life?

I miss working.

12. What do you enjoy most in your post-TBI life?

I can now relax, and I don’t feel like I’m rushing through my day.

13. What do you like least about your TBI?

Besides not working, I also dislike the headaches.

14. Has anything helped you to accept your TBI?

It took time to process how my life and the people around me have changed since my TBI.

15. Has your injury affected your home life and relationships and, if so, how?

My relationships on the whole have gotten better.  Everyone is patient with me and very encouraging.  They help me celebrate any achievements and progress.

16. Has your social life been altered or changed and, if so, how?

My social life has taken a bit of a hit, as it’s hard to commit to a date and time. Every day is different, and I don’t know how I’ll feel.  It’s hard to explain this to people who haven’t been through it.

17. Who is your main caregiver? Do you understand what it takes to be a caregiver?

My main caregiver is my husband.  He helps me be the best I can be and is my cheering section.

18. What are your future plans? What do you expect/hope to be doing ten years from now?

I hope to improve, to be the best I can in our “new normal,” and to be a contributing member of my community in whatever capacity I am able to.

19. Are you able to provide a helpful hint that may have taken you a long time to learn, but which you wished you had known earlier? If so, please state what it is to potentially help other TBI survivors with your specific kind of TBI.

I have learned to make daily reminder-notes. This helps me prioritize important things to do on a daily basis.

20. What advice would you offer to other TBI survivors? Do you have any other comments that you would like to add?

Judy Awards

Judy receives a volunteer appreciation award from the Spina Bifida & Hydrocephalus Association of Ontario.

Assemble a good support team to help you on your journey.  Post-TBI survivors belong in the “car pool lane of life.”

 

Thank you, Judy, for taking part in this interview. I hope that your experience will offer some hope, comfort, and inspiration to my readers.

(Disclaimer: The views or opinions in this post are solely that of the interviewee.)

If you would like to be a part of the SPEAK OUT! project, please go to TBI Survivor Interview Questionnaire for a copy of the questions and the release form.

(Clip Art compliments of Bing.)

SPEAK OUT! Itty-Bitty GIANT Steps

Itty-Bitty GIant Steps for Blog

 

 

SPEAK OUT! Itty-Bitty Giant Steps will provide a venue for brain-injury survivors and caregivers to shout out their accomplishments of the week.

If you have an Itty-Bitty Giant Step and you would like to share it, just send an email to me at donnaodonnellfigurski@gmail.com.

If you are on Facebook, you can simply send a Private Message to me. It need only be a sentence or two. I’ll gather the accomplishments and post them with your name on my blog approximately once a week. (If you do not want your last name to be posted, please tell me in your email or Private Message.)

I hope we have millions of Itty-Bitty Giant Steps.

 

Here are this week’s Itty-Bitty Giant Steps.

Bart Boughner (survivor)…For me, these past ten days were hard, but I held my head up and I did what is best for me and my kids. I allowed outside people to talk with my doctors. My kids are more than willing to help me with just my being honest. I showed them all my meds and explained every one of them. I stayed true to myself, and things turned out well! It’s never a good thing to hide things from people. I always stay an open book to anyone who wants or needs to know.

Bob Calvert (survivor)…I have had five surgeries since my last trip to Iraq and Afghanistan. I keep hoping that there won’t be any more surgeries. But, it looks like I have no choice for a hernia, and the first of two foot-surgeries did not go well. Next week, my doctor is asking Medicare to approve a wheelchair so I can get out of my apartment. Sometimes it gets to me, but what keeps me going is when I keep hearing story after story of what our military men and women and veterans have gone through as a result of their service to our country and what many of them go through every day. That keeps me sitting at this computer as long as I can every day and keeping our talk show (www.talkingwithheroes.com/about) and our mission going.

Michael Coss (survivor)…I am now starting to walk indoors without a cane – 9 years post injury. “Everything is possible when you believe.”

Penelope DeYoung (caregiver)…My husband had finished 13 days of HBOT (hyperbaric oxygen therapy), when, on Tuesday, October 28th, at 3:00 in the morning, I woke up to the bed’s shaking to find him having a grand mal seizure (the second one in five weeks and only the third in two and a half years). He was blessed in more ways than one. First, he had it in the night, so he was already lying down and on his side. I also kept my cool as I called 9-1-1. My husband has made a giant step forward because the doctor dropped a seizure medication that we now know was causing “brain fog.” He upped the dosage of another anti-seizure drug that was making my husband sick when it was started this past summer, but now his body has adjusted to it, and he is tolerating it very well. The higher dose of the “better” anti-seizure drug and the HBOT together have made Jim much more aware. He has shown initiation and motivation. We went to a spaghetti dinner in our hometown last night. People were awed by how much difference they noticed in his awareness. He knew many more people than I did. It was great to see so many people come up to him and say, “It is so good to see you.” Jim’s response to them was, “It is so good to be seen!” I love the progress he has made cognitively! Thanks for letting me share!

Jamie Fairies (survivor)…Hi, Donna. I saw your post on the wall of the group I created – Supporting ABI (Acquired Brain Injury). I thought that perhaps creating that group in 2007 to promote the awareness of brain injury and the Peer Mentor Support Program for those affected by brain injury would be considered an Itty-Bitty Giant Step. I am a survivor of multiple brain injuries.

Melanie Leatherman (survivor)…An Itty-Bitty Giant Step is something small that’s a big deal for us, right? I’m 4 years post. Every year, I’ve tried to go back to my old profession as a stylist, but it never worked out. Friday I tried again, and I could! Awesome feeling. I think it’s a big accomplishment for me. I can pretty much do everything now that I was told I couldn’t. I live alone with my 13-year-old and cook, wash her clothes, and make her lunches for school - things that most mothers don’t realize how big of a deal that is.

Barbara Zirilli-Lonergan (caregiver)…Today is day 40 for my dad. He’s still in the early stages of his recovery. He’s currently in a vegetative state, and he occasionally responds to commands. I am just thankful for today. Love to all of you.

John E. May (survivor)…I have an incredible giant step. I’m still breathing and unnaturally happy!

Grant Mealy (caregiver)…I’m reminded again not to be so hard on my partner, who has PML (progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy). He is not what he used to be, and he never will be again. He did not go through a bad illness to irritate me. I will forgive myself for yelling and move foreword. We are lucky to have each other.

Melinda Murphy (survivor)…One of my secrets that very few people knew was that I lost the ability to tie my shoes after my accident because I was unable to tie a bow. Well today, for the first time in over three and a half years, I did it. I have been crying for an hour. It’s the little things as well as the big that are so very important in that whole “independence thing.” God is so good to me.

Marti Lynch Owens (caregiver)…Gene’s Itty-Bitty Giant Step was last night (November 8th). (His accident was September 25th.) His trach has been removed. He said, “Home, Marti,” and I replied, “Not yet.” He asked, “Why?” and I tried to explain. He was angry, but I didn’t care – I was so happy to hear him speak. He always has emotions. After I left, the hospital called. He got himself out of bed. He was sitting on floor and pulled out his feeding tube, but he is fine – Thank God!

Shana Storms (survivor)…My Itty-Bitty Giant Step is that I went back to school. I got my BS degree. Now on to my MS.

Sunshine Struble (caregiver)…GIANT! January 6th will mark two years for my beautiful boy. He has not slept in his room since the incident – at first because his body was incapable of doing stairs, then because he was so fearful of being away from Mom and Dad. Tonight he is sleeping in his newly designed (in his way) room. I am so proud. It brings tears to my eyes.

Sandra Williams (survivor)…I can exercise without shaking. My shaking wasn’t from fatigue. When I began any form of a stretch and held, my legs would shake, even at the beginning. It’s not the same as shaking when your muscles are tired.

Sandra Williams (caregiver)…My son asked for his own 504 meeting and accommodations at work. (Section 504 is a federal law that protects students with disabilities from being discriminated against.) He said, “I need you to fight for me, Mom. The school isn’t listening.” It’s the first time he has admitted he needs help!

YOU did it!

Congratulations to all contributors!

(Clip Art compliments of Bing.)

 

 

Triking Across America – diagonally –

Photo Journal Part 1

Washington to Florida

 

On June 29, 2014, Catherine (Cat) Brubaker and Dan Zimmerman set off from Anacortes, Washington on their recumbent trikes to trike across America – diagonally. Their destination – Key West, Florida – a trip of 5,200 miles.

I can’t even wrap my head around driving 5,200 miles in a car, let alone covering that distance under pedal-power. (I made up that word.)

Here's what 5,200 miles looks like.

Here’s what 5,200 miles looks like.

 

01 Cat on Trike 10350428_10204753083335148_667202674095765199_n

Cat, who survived two brain injuries triked to raise awareness for Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) on “Cat’s Ride for Life.”

02 Dan on Trike 1069184_441000132665517_2000066735_n

Dan, a stroke survivor, pedaled for awareness for stroke prevention with “Spokes Fighting Strokes.”

This is the van loaded down with equipment that will be traveling with Cat and Dan

This is the van loaded down with equipment, supplies, and food that will be traveling with Cat and Dan.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Oops! A blowout before the trip even begins.

Oops! A blowout before the trip even begins

Cat is interviewed by  AZCentral - 12 News - The Arizona Republic

Cat is interviewed by AZCentral – 12 News – The Arizona Republic

Cat and Dan ride under "Spokes Fighting Strokes."

Cat and Dan ride under “Spokes Fighting Strokes.”

 

 

 

 

 

Cat and Dan ride about 50 miles per day and their average speed is about 13mph. They’ve seen a wolf, wild turkeys, and even “giant” crickets in Washington. Here are some of the beautiful sites Cat has encountered along the way. (More to come.)

 10420010_10204564402018233_4022721289719272020_n

Check out the Ascent and Elevation on this Garmin.

Cat and Bear sharing a little love.

Cat and Bear sharing a little love.

Washington sites

Washington sites

 M10338763_10204580536701590_2716290322768561350_n

Lake McDonald in National Glacier Park

Purple wild flowers along the highway

Purple wild flowers along the highway

Hmm, wondering if this will be Cat's new wheels for another Trip Across America.

Hmm, wondering if this will be Cat’s new wheels for another Trip Across America.

Pure bliss

Pure bliss

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