TBI – Survivors, Caregivers, Family, and Friends

Archive for April 25, 2015

SPEAK OUT! Faces of Brain Injury Davien Lopez

Brain Injury is Not Discriminating

bigstock-cartoon-face-vector-people-25671746-e1348136261718It can happen to anyone, anytime, . . . and anywhere.

The Brain Trauma Foundation states that there are 5.3 million people in the United States living with some form of brain injury.

On Faces of Brain Injury,” you will meet survivors living with brain injury. I hope that their stories will help you to understand the serious implications and complications of brain injury.

The stories on SPEAK OUT! Faces of Brain Injury are published with the permission of the survivor or designated caregiver.

If you would like your story to be published, please send a short account and two photos to me at neelyf@aol.com. I’d love to publish your story and raise awareness for Brain Injury – one view at a time.

Davien Lopez (survivor) contributed by Diana Lopez (mom and caregiver)

10501889_768245286553199_2546552260294944140_nI am the mother of a now six-year-old boy who has a TBI (traumatic brain injury). My son, Davien, was four and a half years old when people in a car were shooting at people in Davien Lopez with brotheranother car in front of our house. While Davien was napping in my arms, a stray bullet came through our bedroom window and the headboard and struck my son in his left frontal lobe. The bullet traveled diagonally across Davien’s face and lodged in the right side of his cheek. Davien suffers from bilateral frontal lobe brain damage. He had a fractured jaw, which is healed now. He is completely blind in his right eye. He has PTSD (post-traumatic stress disorder), ADHD (attention deficit hyperactivity disorder), a mood disorder, Davien Lopez 033015and an impulse disorder. A year and a half later, Davien runs around like nothing happened. He still has a ton of psychiatric issues, but that is nothing compared to what could have occurred. A smile emoticon here is a picture of Davien and Bruno (Davien’s service dog in training).

Disclaimer:
Any views and opinions of the Contributor are purely his/her own.

(Clip Art compliments of Bing.)

(Photos compliments of contributor.)

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SPEAK OUT! Faces of Brain Injury Adam Pepiton

Brain Injury is Not Discriminatingbigstock-cartoon-face-vector-people-25671746-e1348136261718

It can happen to anyone, anytime, . . . and anywhere.

The Brain Trauma Foundation states that there are 5.3 million people in the United States living with some form of brain injury.

On “Faces of Brain Injury,” you will meet survivors living with brain injury. I hope that their stories will help you to understand the serious implications and complications of brain injury.

The stories on SPEAK OUT! Faces of Brain Injury are published with the permission of the survivor or designated caregiver.

If you would like your story to be published, please send a short account and two photos to me at neelyf@aol.com. I’d love to publish your story and raise awareness for Brain Injury – one view at a time.

Adam Pepiton (survivor) contributed by Tara Pepiton (mom and caregiver)

Pepiton, Adam 2Adam Pepiton, a graduate of Cesar Chavez High School, was living a full life as a college student studying Criminal Justice, working for Kmart, and spending time with family and friends. On September 5th, 2010, Adam’s life changed forever.  As he left a friend’s house after a barbecue, he became the victim of a drive-by shooting. He was shot in the head. The bullet entered on the right side and lodged in the skull on the left side. This type of injury has less than a 1% survival rate, so Adam’s surviving was a true miracle. After five weeks in ICU (Intensive Care Unit) and Acute Care, Adam spent eight weeks at an acute rehabilitation facility. On December 2nd, he was discharged. While Adam’s return home was a significant milestone in his recovery, we recognized that there was still a long road ahead. Adam was diagnosed as a quadriparetic due to the brain injury.  Pepiton, Adam 1This means Adam has feeling throughout his body, but he can’t control his legs, trunk, and most of his left arm.  Adam has a power-wheelchair that allows for mobility, but he still has the goal of walking again.  He is going back to college part-time, and he has participated in sports, such as archery and power-soccer. He volunteers two days a week for the Red Cross, Greater Phoenix Chapter, and does many activities with old and new friends.  Adam works daily on improvements to meet his ultimate goals of living an independent life and of speaking to youth on violence and the decisions they make. Through all of this, Adam has kept his unwavering faith in God and his quirky sense of humor. We thank amazing family, friends, doctors, and outstanding therapists for everything they have done to get him to where he is today and to where he still plans on going.

Disclaimer:
Any views and opinions of the Contributor are purely his/her own.

(Clip Art compliments of Bing.)

(Photos compliments of contributor.)

As I say after each post:

Please leave a comment by clicking the blue words “Leave a Comment” below this post.

Feel free to follow my blog. Click on “Follow” on the upper right sidebar.

If you like my blog, share it with your friends. It’s easy! Click the “Share” buttons below.

If you don’t like my blog, “Share” it with your enemies. I don’t care!

Feel free to “Like” my post.

SPEAK OUT! Faces of Brain Injury Faith Neaves

Brain Injury is Not Discriminatingbigstock-cartoon-face-vector-people-25671746-e1348136261718

It can happen to anyone, anytime, . . . and anywhere.

The Brain Trauma Foundation states that there are 5.3 million people in the United States living with some form of brain injury.

On “Faces of Brain Injury,” you will meet survivors living with brain injury. I hope that their stories will help you to understand the serious implications and complications of brain injury.

The stories on SPEAK OUT! Faces of Brain Injury are published with the permission of the survivor or designated caregiver.

If you would like your story to be published, please send a short account and two photos to me at neelyf@aol.com. I’d love to publish your story and raise awareness for Brain Injury – one view at a time.

Faith Neaves (survivor)

11104222_10153117046022976_1329541496_nAbout seven years ago, I suffered a traumatic brain injury from a domestic-violence incident. My ex-husband knocked me completely unconscious when I walked around a corner. I was eight months pregnant at the time. I remember opening my eyes and not being able to see. I was lying in a puddle of blood. I never got help. I was too afraid because he was in the military. As I went in and out of consciousness, I wrote my little girls goodbye letters and hoped for the best. After that night, things were never the same. I struggled with severe depression, anxiety, crying spells, memory loss, raging, etc. – you name it. My moods would switch quickly. On a daily basis, I would forget names of people I knew or directions to places I used to go to. For the past eight years, I have been wrongly diagnosed as bipolar. I struggle with suicide, and I almost succeeded, which ended up with my being hospitalized and having more meds. Finally, I was diagnosed with a very severe frontal lobe brain injury with no hope of recovering. The doctor told me that I have a “light switch,” where most people have “thermometers.” It affects my personality, emotions, speech, and sleep. My brain has trouble with cognitive abilities, problem-solving, and conversations. I interrupt people a lot due to my brain trying to get out a word. I struggle with fatigue. The worry, anxiety, and depression are a lot to deal with, but at least I know that it’s not my fault – that it’s not from my being bipolar. 11077229_10153117046027976_657824417_nI have been exhausted, and I have felt crazy and indecisive. I have to write everything down on sticky notes – I forget dates, my phone number, and my address. My in-laws and family have judged me as crazy, having red flags, etc. – you name it. I feel they have no empathy. I’m not a victim, but a SURVIVOR. I miss me. I am devastated at who I used to be and what I have lost. I thought this was temporary and due to stress. I’m only 35, and I’m scared for my future. I’m devastated to carry the ugly scar now on both the outside and the inside. I pray that I will find love and support somewhere.

Disclaimer:
Any views and opinions of the Contributor are purely his/her own.

(Clip art compliments of Bing.)

(Photos compliments of contributor.)

As I say after each post:

Please leave a comment by clicking the blue words “Leave a Comment” below this post.

Feel free to follow my blog. Click on “Follow” on the upper right sidebar.

If you like my blog, share it with your friends. It’s easy! Click the “Share” buttons below.

If you don’t like my blog, “Share” it with your enemies. I don’t care!

Feel free to “Like” my post.

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