TBI – Survivors, Caregivers, Family, and Friends

SPEAK OUT! – Daisy Lou

by

Donna O’Donnell Figurski

Daisy Lou

      1. What is your name? (last name optional)

Daisy Lou

2. Where do you live? (city and/or state and/or country) Email (optional)

Boyertown, Pennsylvania, USA

3. When did you have your TBI? At what age?

The first one was on July 6, 2012. I was 30 years old. The second one was in February 2014. I was 32 years old.

4. How did your TBI occur?

Someone ran a stop sign and T-boned my car for the first one. I don’t remember the accident, but my car was totaled. For the second one, I fell in the street on six inches of ice.

5. When did you (or someone) first realize you had a problem?

In August 2012, I started having back problems. I realized in November that I was having other problems, like nausea, dizziness, balance being off, sleeping all the time, noise sensitivity, and headaches, among a multitude of other problems. But I waited until December (5 months after my accident) to talk to the doctor. For the second one, I realized I had a problem a few days after I fell, when my nose started dripping and I started sleeping a lot. I wasn’t sick at the time.

6. What kind of emergency treatment, if any, did you have?

None

7. Were you in a coma? If so, how long?

No

8. Did you do rehab? What kind of rehab (i.e., In-patient or Out-patient and Occupational, Physical, Speech, Other)?
How long were you in rehab?

For the first TBI, I did physical therapy for a month and a half as an Out-patient. I did biofeedback with a neuropsychologist for four months. For the second one, I took a week off of work. That’s all.

9. What problems or disabilities, if any, resulted from your TBI (e.g., balance, perception, personality, etc.)?

I sometimes have balance problems. If I try to get up too quickly, I get dizzy. I have lots of memory problems, anxiety, impulsiveness, and trouble concentrating. I tend to tell people things three or four times because I forget whether or not I’ve told them whatever that thing happens to be. I get frustrated very easily. I have trouble talking and finding words. I don’t handle stress very well, and sometimes I can’t handle it at all. I get tired very easily, and sometimes I have to take a nap in the middle of the day.

10. How has your life changed? Is it better? Is it worse?

It’s better in the fact that I don’t remember things. So, if something happens that is upsetting, I soon forget it. But that’s also worse because I forget things I want to remember. I’ve learned to become more patient with myself and with other people.

11. What do you miss the most from your pre-TBI life?

I miss being able to explain something to someone and have them understand what I’m saying. Now I can’t seem to find the right words.

12. What do you enjoy most in your post-TBI life?

When my brain is functioning on a capable level, I enjoy explaining to people what a TBI is like and how it affects you. To some people who seem interested, I give the address of an interesting blog to look at, so they can understand TBI even better.

13. What do you like least about your TBI?

I dislike forgetting things and feeling stupid all the time. I feel like a part of my brain has gone missing, and no matter how much I search for it, it continues to hide from me.

14. Has anything helped you to accept your TBI?

Time and talking about it with friends

15. Has your injury affected your home life and relationships and, if so, how?

Not really. It’s more that I forget where I put things more often, so I’m continually asking someone if they’ve seen the items I’m looking for. But my relationships haven’t really changed, and my home life hasn’t changed.

16. Has your social life been altered or changed and, if so, how?

I always was a loner, but I’m more of a hermit than before. I tend to stay in more often or go places by myself, instead of asking someone to go with me. Even if the person is on the way to wherever it is I’m going, I don’t call them because it seems like too much work to have to drive to their house and then talk to them until I drop them back off at their house.

17. Who is your main caregiver? Do you understand what it takes to be a caregiver?

Myself – I don’t have a caregiver. Although, I live with my mom, and she’s the one I’m always asking where things are.

18. What are your future plans? What do you expect/hope to be doing ten years from now?

Right now, I’m just concentrating on making it through the day. I have no future plans, except to take things one day at a time.

19. Are you able to provide a helpful hint that may have taken you a long time to learn, but which you wished you had known earlier? If so, please state what it is to potentially help other TBI survivors with your specific kind of TBI.

Write everything down! If you have memory problems, it makes your life so much easier when you can look at a piece of paper and say, “Oh yeah, that’s what I wanted to do!”

20. What advice would you offer to other TBI survivors? Do you have any other comments that you would like to add?

Rome wasn’t built in a day…. It’s frustrating to suddenly have some part of your body go berserk on you, but don’t beat yourself up. A very important part of your anatomy was bruised and battered, and it takes time for it to heal. Everyone recovers at a different rate, so don’t expect the same results as someone else with a TBI.

Daisy Lou

Daisy Lou

 

Thank you, Daisy Lou, for taking part in this interview. I hope that your experience will offer some hope, comfort, and inspiration to my readers.

(Disclaimer: The views or opinions in this post are solely that of the interviewee.)

(Photos compliments of Daisy Lou.)

If you would like to be a part of this project, please go to TBI Survivor Interview Questionnaire for a copy of the questions and the release form.

Advertisements

Comments on: "Survivors SPEAK OUT! . . . Daisy Lou" (3)

  1. Daisy, thanks for your transparent, honest feedback about your injury. I suffered a TBI 11 years ago and still have symptoms, many which you have expressed: irritability, fatigue, poor concentration, and difficulty with word finding. I’m always saying, “It’s on the tip of my tongue.” I used to be more social and now I find that I prefer to stay home or do things alone. I also find it difficult to commit to things, because I never know how I’m going to feel on that particular day. So, Daisy, thanks again for sharing your story. BTW, you sum-up perfectly what it’s like to have a TBI when you say, “I feel like a part of my brain has gone missing, and no matter how much I search for it, it continues to hide from me.”

    Liked by 1 person

    • Melissa,
      I love your response to Daisy and I am glad that you were able to relate to her story. I love it when survivors can help survivors. I hope she will see your response and connect with you. Melissa, thanks so much for your post.

      Donna O’Donnell Figurski
      survivingtraumaticbraininjury.com
      donnaodonnellfigurski.wordpress.com

      Like

  2. crazydaisylou said:

    Hi Melissa. I’m glad that you enjoyed reading my interview. I’m sorry to see that you have been living with this for so long. Thank you for telling me about your experience with TBI. It’s always nice to know that there are people out there that know how you feel, that you aren’t alone in this world.

    Daisy

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Tag Cloud

Ten Thousand Days

The long and winding journey after loss

Wordcrafter9's Blog

Just another WordPress.com weblog

Tripambitions

It contains the world best places and things.

No memory of the day that changed my life

My name is Michelle Munt and this is my story about surviving a brain injury and what I continue to learn about it. This is for other survivors and their loved ones, but also to raise awareness of what can happen to those in an accident. This invisible injury too often goes undiagnosed and it can be difficult to find information about it. I will talk about things that have helped me as I continue to recover and invite others to see if it works for them too.

Everything and nothing. GM1123 😊

Bienvenue. I’m thinking this is the spot where I am to write a witty, flowery personal section that pulls you in......I got nuthin’

Teresa472002's Blog

Just another WordPress.com site

The Concussion Blog

An Education and Communication Outpost from an Athletic Trainer's Perspective

Howdy Hydrocephalus

Understanding my unique gyroscope

Recoveryofthemind.com

Head Injuries Change Everything

Sheri Lawrence de Grom

From the literary and legislative trenches.

With Grace ALWAYS

...doing my best to live a life of grace...

Mild to Moderate

TBI - Survivors, Caregivers, Family, and Friends

Hope for Trauma

TBI - Survivors, Caregivers, Family, and Friends

Lisabeth Mackall

Finding our way back

My Broken Brain

Putting the pieces back together again after encephalitis

The Visger Group

TBI - Survivors, Caregivers, Family, and Friends

melissacronin.com

TBI - Survivors, Caregivers, Family, and Friends

Inside Danielle's mind

Striving for serenity

%d bloggers like this: